Complaints follow end of nurses strik...

Complaints follow end of nurses strike in Twin Cities

There are 47 comments on the TwinCities.com story from Jun 11, 2010, titled Complaints follow end of nurses strike in Twin Cities. In it, TwinCities.com reports that:

The return from a one-day strike by 12,800 Twin Cities nurses was marked Friday morning by union complaints that some members were barred from work and that a union organizer was roughly removed from a hospital.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at TwinCities.com.

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jdm

Hugo, MN

#41 Jun 13, 2010
We want to support you but you are being goofy. Your union, idiot statements, tactics make you fools (not just look like). Take a look at the real world and what's going on.

p.s. And we pretty much like the way hospitals are run...we aren't so keen on insurance companies.
Remember

Sauk Centre, MN

#42 Jun 13, 2010
Remember Half the nurses that provide you with care graduated in the bottom half of there class.
st pauly girl

Minneapolis, MN

#43 Jun 13, 2010
i work in a hospital that went on strike on Thur....Its was so nice to deal with the replacement workers!! NO BIT**ING !! Just remember this nurses...ANYONE is replaceable!!
RN Retired

Gully, MN

#44 Jun 13, 2010
Is there any data that proves mandated RN-to-patient ratios improves
patient outcomes?
A. Yes!
There are more than 60 studies that directly link safe RN staffing to reduced rates of patient deaths and
post-operative complications, including respiratory failure, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, shock,
upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and shorter hospital lengths-of-stay. Check out additional research
findings in the appendix.
 Increasing the number of full-time RNs on staff per day by one, there were 9 percent fewer
hospital-related deaths in intensive care units, 16 percent fewer in surgical patients, and 6 percent
fewer in medical patients — Healthcare Risk Management, February 2008.
 Cutting RN-to-patient ratios to 1:4 nationally could save as many as 72,000 lives annually, and is
less costly than many other basic safety interventions common in hospitals, including clot-busting
medications for heart attack and PAP tests for cervical cancer — Medical Care, Journal of the American
Public Health Association, August 2005.
 Cancer surgery patients are safer in hospitals with better RN-to-patient ratios. A study of 1,300
Texas patients undergoing a common surgery for bladder cancer documented a cut in patient
mortality rates of more than 50 percent — Cancer Journal of the American Cancer Society,
September 2005.
MN nurse

Minneapolis, MN

#45 Jun 13, 2010
Support for the Hospital wrote:
When the unions and nursed complain, maybe they need to see what the patient or the family member sees. I was just in the emergency room at united on Thursday nite and the same thing happened like every other time I am at the hospital. The nursed are all standing together talking, there was no shortage of nursed just a shortage of nursed who actually wanted to work
Funny. You were there on Thursday night? The night of the strike huh? Come on a day when the hospital is actually taking admissions. Most of the patients were diverted. They only took walk-ins!
Monk

Salem, OR

#46 Jun 14, 2010
RN Retired wrote:
Is there any data that proves mandated RN-to-patient ratios improves
patient outcomes?
A. Yes!
There are more than 60 studies that directly link safe RN staffing to reduced rates of patient deaths and
post-operative complications, including respiratory failure, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, shock,
upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and shorter hospital lengths-of-stay. Check out additional research
findings in the appendix.
 Increasing the number of full-time RNs on staff per day by one, there were 9 percent fewer
hospital-related deaths in intensive care units, 16 percent fewer in surgical patients, and 6 percent
fewer in medical patients — Healthcare Risk Management, February 2008.
 Cutting RN-to-patient ratios to 1:4 nationally could save as many as 72,000 lives annually, and is
less costly than many other basic safety interventions common in hospitals, including clot-busting
medications for heart attack and PAP tests for cervical cancer — Medical Care, Journal of the American
Public Health Association, August 2005.
 Cancer surgery patients are safer in hospitals with better RN-to-patient ratios. A study of 1,300
Texas patients undergoing a common surgery for bladder cancer documented a cut in patient
mortality rates of more than 50 percent — Cancer Journal of the American Cancer Society,
September 2005.
You are a voice of reason in this emotional debate.
Thanks for sharing facts and data to defend Nurses.
The anti-Nurse crowd offers nothing but lies and innuendo. Nurses are on the frontlines of healthcare. Stick to your guns- it's important you win this dispute for all of us.
old school

Inman, SC

#47 Jun 16, 2010
I have been in the medical profession for 32 years but not always as a nurse. I have seen many changes and not all for the good. Yes hospitals are big business but they need to step back and remember who their customers are. There are simple and logically solutions to healthcare reform yet those who sit on executive boards and worse in Washington DC who have never and will never deliver 1 second of patient care make decisions that ultimately effect patients negetively. Instead of making hospitals look like fancy hotels, put that money into staffing. Instead of hospitals being top heavy and scaling back on the people who actually deliver patient care,not just nursing care,lets cut some upper management positions. I don't understand how management can consciously say the beefing up staffing is costly when they fork out millions of dollars for consulting firms to tell them how they are doing and the results come back with complaints that the patient never saw their nurse or got the care they deserved. Some days I leave work and wonder if I will ever be able to give my patients the time and the care they deserve and that I expected to give them by becoming a nurse. For those of you who think that these nurses are demanding to much I hope if you or your loved one are ever a patient that you get the care you/they deserve. And if you don't remember we don't have time, you are not the only one who needs us.

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