Women of all faiths distribute hundre...

Women of all faiths distribute hundreds of hijabs to invite conversations about faith

There are 12 comments on the Insight News story from Jul 26, 2012, titled Women of all faiths distribute hundreds of hijabs to invite conversations about faith. In it, Insight News reports that:

In the spirit of uniting people of all faiths and cultures and starting important conversations, a young women's Muslim group, along with more than 50 volunteers of diverse faiths, will gather on Nicollet Mall in honor of Hijab Day.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Insight News.

Miss Piggy

Minneapolis, MN

#1 Jul 27, 2012
They say the role of the hijab in Islam is an often misunderstood. The role of the hijab and other "cover-ups" is the suppression of women, despite inane publicity stunts like this!
Hijab Day: Give Me A F-en Break!!!!!!!LMFAO
Miss Oinker

Saint Paul, MN

#2 Jul 27, 2012
Racist baggers don't like hijab day? I'm shocked.
Miss Piggy

Minneapolis, MN

#3 Jul 27, 2012
Miss Oinker wrote:
Racist baggers don't like hijab day? I'm shocked.
Emotionally stunted, liberal, sexist chauvinist pigs think it's OK to oppress women in the name of a religious cult. I'm not shocked!!!!
Seattle Slew

Kent, WA

#4 Jul 27, 2012
Are Muslims Mormons ??? Funny, you pretend to care about oppressed women, but it's just hatred of different cultures, porker...
Miss Oinker

Saint Paul, MN

#5 Jul 27, 2012
Miss Piggy wrote:
<quoted text>Emotionally stunted, liberal, sexist chauvinist pigs think it's OK to oppress women in the name of a religious cult. I'm not shocked!!!!
Three "brilliant" icons in fifteen minutes. You're on your game today Schmahl!
A woman in Minneapolis

Minneapolis, MN

#6 Jul 29, 2012
http://tinyurl.com/c4k24w7

There are many factors surrounding the traditions of any given culture. To some, freedom for a woman means being able to show as much skin as she wants. To others, it means not having to display herself for the enjoyment of any man but those very close to her. Taken to the extreme, either one can be detrimental, but to impose our own belief systems on these women instead of listening to them and considering what they have to say about their own culture and traditions, is to take away their voice just as completely as anyone else.

Let's take a step back and allow the women everyone is so concerned about, who are actually part of the culture everyone else is so concerned about, to speak for themselves.
CRASSUS

Green Bay, WI

#7 Jul 29, 2012
A woman in Minneapolis wrote:
http://tinyurl.com/c4k24w7
There are many factors surrounding the traditions of any given culture. To some, freedom for a woman means being able to show as much skin as she wants. To others, it means not having to display herself for the enjoyment of any man but those very close to her. Taken to the extreme, either one can be detrimental, but to impose our own belief systems on these women instead of listening to them and considering what they have to say about their own culture and traditions, is to take away their voice just as completely as anyone else.
Let's take a step back and allow the women everyone is so concerned about, who are actually part of the culture everyone else is so concerned about, to speak for themselves.
In America, we go with the skin. If you don't like it, get the hell out!
Miss Piggy

Minneapolis, MN

#8 Jul 29, 2012
A woman in Minneapolis wrote:
http://tinyurl.com/c4k24w7
There are many factors surrounding the traditions of any given culture. To some, freedom for a woman means being able to show as much skin as she wants. To others, it means not having to display herself for the enjoyment of any man but those very close to her. Taken to the extreme, either one can be detrimental, but to impose our own belief systems on these women instead of listening to them and considering what they have to say about their own culture and traditions, is to take away their voice just as completely as anyone else.
Let's take a step back and allow the women everyone is so concerned about, who are actually part of the culture everyone else is so concerned about, to speak for themselves.
Typical liberal response. I saw a woman pushing a shopping cart with a fully draped 3 year old sitting in it. Saw a little 10 year old at the park, trying to play soccer in the head-to-toe get up. It was pathetic.
Can a 3 year old speak for herself? Can a ten year old explain why she can't play with the other girls? Slavery was once the "culture and tradition" too. I suppose you will "speak up" for that too.
Too bad you can't see brainwashing for what it is, I guess that's what makes you a liberal.
MissingMinnesota

Wapello, IA

#9 Jul 29, 2012
A woman in Minneapolis wrote:
http://tinyurl.com/c4k24w7
There are many factors surrounding the traditions of any given culture. To some, freedom for a woman means being able to show as much skin as she wants. To others, it means not having to display herself for the enjoyment of any man but those very close to her. Taken to the extreme, either one can be detrimental, but to impose our own belief systems on these women instead of listening to them and considering what they have to say about their own culture and traditions, is to take away their voice just as completely as anyone else.
Let's take a step back and allow the women everyone is so concerned about, who are actually part of the culture everyone else is so concerned about, to speak for themselves.
Let women speak for themselves? What a novel concept!/sarcasm

Though, I guess letting women speak for themselves is getting less and less popular in this country, so I shouldn't be surprised that people are reacting hostilely to your suggestion.

Some people, like Miss Piggy, either forget or simply don't know that a lot of Muslim women actually choose to wear the hijab. They forget that there is more than one side to every story and that there are varying degrees to which Muslim women cover up. Yes, some women are forced to do so, but certainly not all.

Sometimes people like Miss Piggy choose to fight a fight without actually understanding what they're fighting.
Miss Piggy

Minneapolis, MN

#10 Jul 29, 2012
MissingMinnesota wrote:
<quoted text>
Let women speak for themselves? What a novel concept!/sarcasm
Though, I guess letting women speak for themselves is getting less and less popular in this country, so I shouldn't be surprised that people are reacting hostilely to your suggestion.
Some people, like Miss Piggy, either forget or simply don't know that a lot of Muslim women actually choose to wear the hijab. They forget that there is more than one side to every story and that there are varying degrees to which Muslim women cover up. Yes, some women are forced to do so, but certainly not all.
Sometimes people like Miss Piggy choose to fight a fight without actually understanding what they're fighting.
Sometimes people like Missing Minnesota make stupid replies without reading or understanding the original comment! What part of "Brainwashing" don't you understand?
The women of Jonestown CHOSE to drink the poison kool ade too, what choice do little kids have to dress like 7th century slaves?
MissingMinnesota

Wapello, IA

#11 Jul 29, 2012
Miss Piggy wrote:
<quoted text>
Sometimes people like Missing Minnesota make stupid replies without reading or understanding the original comment! What part of "Brainwashing" don't you understand?
The women of Jonestown CHOSE to drink the poison kool ade too, what choice do little kids have to dress like 7th century slaves?
I read and understood the original comment. Choosing to wear something that is culturally significant when you don't have to is not brainwashing. It's marking oneself as a member of a certain religion or culture. For some cultures, covering your head is a sign of modesty and wearing a hijab is no different than choosing a long skirt over a mini. There are other cultures in which various clothing items have cultural significance. Is it brainwashing for a Catholic to wear a crucifix? Or to wear an American flag on a t-shirt to show your nationality? Or for an Indian woman to wear a saree to show her ethnic heritage? How is it any better for you to tell someone not to wear a hijab than for someone to tell them they have to?

As far as little kids having a choice, parents make decisions for their children all the time. It's part of being a parent. Wearing a headscarf or modest clothing isn't going to hurt them.

Wearing the hijab won't kill someone or hurt them. It's an article of clothing, not poison. Comparing suicide to wearing the hijab is insulting to the people whose lives have been ruined by the suicide of a loved one. I recommend choosing your comparisons more carefully.
CRASSUS

Green Bay, WI

#12 Jul 29, 2012
MissingMinnesota wrote:
<quoted text>
I read and understood the original comment. Choosing to wear something that is culturally significant when you don't have to is not brainwashing. It's marking oneself as a member of a certain religion or culture. For some cultures, covering your head is a sign of modesty and wearing a hijab is no different than choosing a long skirt over a mini. There are other cultures in which various clothing items have cultural significance. Is it brainwashing for a Catholic to wear a crucifix? Or to wear an American flag on a t-shirt to show your nationality? Or for an Indian woman to wear a saree to show her ethnic heritage? How is it any better for you to tell someone not to wear a hijab than for someone to tell them they have to?
As far as little kids having a choice, parents make decisions for their children all the time. It's part of being a parent. Wearing a headscarf or modest clothing isn't going to hurt them.
Wearing the hijab won't kill someone or hurt them. It's an article of clothing, not poison. Comparing suicide to wearing the hijab is insulting to the people whose lives have been ruined by the suicide of a loved one. I recommend choosing your comparisons more carefully.
The hijab is a great way to identify a Muslim in times of ethnic cleansing.http://muslimvillage .com/2012/07/30/25860/planned- ethnic-cleansing-of-muslims-in -assam-india/

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