Strike's fallout could spread beyond unionized hospitals, report warns

A nursing strike of 14 hospitals - a near certainty if negotiations falter today - could be a financial blow to the Twin Cities' health care market, according to a report issued Monday by Moody's Investors Service. Full Story
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local nurse

Minneapolis, MN

#1 Jun 28, 2010
I am going to cross the lines.....and make bank! The Unions are unreasonable and trouble. Why do they speak for nurses?

Let the Market decide and let nurses negotiate their own wages, based on skill and performance not on "who has hung around the longest"!

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lpn

Minneapolis, MN

#2 Jun 28, 2010
I see 2 freight trains heading to a crossroads...and nobody willin' to pull the switch
Wish I was in healthcare

Minneapolis, MN

#3 Jun 28, 2010
Is there any other job in the US where after a 4 year degree from any college you can make 50-80k WITH benefits, pension, and mandated yearly raises.... in this economy. Nurses have stressful jobs but certainly not more than air traffic controllers, police, etc. Wake up nurses, I have seen my income decline 45% in the past two years and have to stay at work without getting paid. You are insulated from the realities of this economy: Public sympathy will not rise if the strike occurs.

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Since: Apr 08

Saint Croix Falls, WI

#4 Jun 29, 2010
Goodbye union. Had you been reasonable you would have a contract.
Are you kidding

Saint Paul, MN

#5 Jun 29, 2010
Unfortunately, I see a long strike coming. The
union is essentially saying they want to become
partners with the hospitals and have a say in
staffing ratios, as well as scheduling nurses
around patient flucuations. Management, at least
at this point, is holding fast on that subject
and appears willing to hold fast for a long time.
So no matter who wins, in the end we all lose.
Management will spend too much, nurses will lose
wages and patient good will, and the patients will
lose the care they hoped to get. I hope I am
wrong, but..........

By the way, Children's Hospital would strike?
My firstborn died in Children's as a baby and I
will never forget the nurses who took care of
him there..........I am a big boy and I
know the score when I go into the hospital. But
Children's? Who walks out on those kids? I hope
no one does.
grjanssen

Minneapolis, MN

#6 Jun 29, 2010
LET'S BE HONEST
Nurses' going on strike for "the Patients" is akin to teachers going out for
"the Children"! Both explanations are equally deceptive! However, they are
believed to be more palatable to the public than the far more honest
explanation of, "wanting more pay & benefits for me and my family".
Of course, the former explanation begs the question, how much is enough? How
much would guarantee first rate patient care? How much would guarantee
first rate public education? Would the amount needed also guarantee a
nurse/teacher wage that would be acceptable to all?
I would rather hear the obvious from both groups, "we are not receiving the
pay we believe our education and responsibilities require"! How refreshing
that would be! Honesty from professional groups demanding more pay &
benefits they think they deserve, rather than demands based on questionable,
altruistic, explanations.
George Janssen
Minneapolis
the troll

Minneapolis, MN

#7 Jun 29, 2010
Wish I was in healthcare wrote:
Is there any other job in the US where after a 4 year degree from any college you can make 50-80k WITH benefits, pension, and mandated yearly raises.... in this economy. Nurses have stressful jobs but certainly not more than air traffic controllers, police, etc. Wake up nurses, I have seen my income decline 45% in the past two years and have to stay at work without getting paid. You are insulated from the realities of this economy: Public sympathy will not rise if the strike occurs.
Quit wishing and make a change to better yourself. Go get the degree and apply for a job. sounds like there will be some openings. Join a union and get rid of the abuse via your employer who makes you stay without pay. Insulate yourself against the upcoming employer harrasment by getting an agreement with collective bargaining and representation. Quit wishing and start living!
the troll

Minneapolis, MN

#8 Jun 29, 2010
Wish I was in healthcare wrote:
Is there any other job in the US where after a 4 year degree from any college you can make 50-80k WITH benefits, pension, and mandated yearly raises.... in this economy. Nurses have stressful jobs but certainly not more than air traffic controllers, police, etc. Wake up nurses, I have seen my income decline 45% in the past two years and have to stay at work without getting paid. You are insulated from the realities of this economy: Public sympathy will not rise if the strike occurs.
Banking, Finance, Sales,Computer Software, NEtworking, Unix, Medical Quality Control, Cad/CAm design+ manufacturing all make more than a nurse, especially if you go with a Fortune top 1000 employer. Nurses have been in high demand because of all the baby boomers needing and affording more health care. In the retirement states the wages were higher than yankee union wages with relocation bonuses because of the high demand. And the norther states had to follow to stop the drain of talent. The people who are jealous of Nurses who graduate and make 50 a year are out of touch with the skilled job market.
Dave from Lakeland

Minneapolis, MN

#9 Jun 29, 2010
Wish I was in healthcare wrote:
Is there any other job in the US where after a 4 year degree from any college you can make 50-80k WITH benefits, pension, and mandated yearly raises.... in this economy. Nurses have stressful jobs but certainly not more than air traffic controllers, police, etc. Wake up nurses, I have seen my income decline 45% in the past two years and have to stay at work without getting paid. You are insulated from the realities of this economy: Public sympathy will not rise if the strike occurs.
An RN is only a 2 year degree. A 4 year is a different program
Health Care

Saint Paul, MN

#10 Jun 29, 2010
Dave from Lakeland wrote:
<quoted text>
An RN is only a 2 year degree. A 4 year is a different program
Wrong wrong wrong.

The 2 year is the bare minimum to be a not top notch RN. Four year is the standard
Realist

Saint Paul, MN

#11 Jun 29, 2010
The hospital administrators are making big money doing nothing but trying to figure out how to squeeze more money out of us all.

The nurses do all the important and life preserving work. The nurses are right in this battle.
letsbehonest

Saint Paul, MN

#12 Jun 29, 2010
this is what i have learned about the health care facility which i work at and is involved in this strike. and i am a "grunt". never been in management and don't want to be. i actually do care about "quality of patient care".

Why would we accept a strike when we know it will hurt us financially? Because this contract will make the future of our medical care nonviable. The contract proposed by the Union would add at least $135 million to the cost of our care at this one hospital over the three year contract an increase that would imperil the financial future and render health care unaffordable to our community and many of our patients.
Additionally, patient outcomes at this hospital in Minnesota are better than the rest of country including California. Inpatient mortality, the most objective measure of patient safety, is 38% lower at this hospital than similar sized hospitals in the United States and its 30% lower than California, the state with mandated, fixed staffing ratios. Our rate of pressure ulcers, the complication most sensitive to nursing attention, is 25% lower than similar sized hospitals in California. We already surpass California with the staffing model that we have currently in place.
This is not about patient safety. This is about the future and viability of health care delivery at this hospital and elsewhere. That is why we must confront these issues now.
Our challenge is to continuously redesign care to make it more affordable as the money we receive for services drops from the State, the recession and soon from the Federal government. This will require that the people doing the work have the flexibility and creativity to continuously improve the work. it is hoped that the ability of teams to improve the delivery of health care, making it still safer and more affordable can be accomplished by using a flexible rather than a rigid approach.
so there you have it. you decide what this strike is all about. patient care or the money. if you want to go the way of the detroit autoworkers once the hospitals can no longer afford to give patient care, and they start closing, well then you can get ready for really massive layoffs, won't matter if you are in a union or not. then watch what happens to your pay, benefits and pension.
the hospitals realize that the days of expansion, waterfalls outside their institutions, luxurious rooms are over. that management system made the mistake of expanding based on investment income in the markets in years past. and we know what happened to the markets. now they will be focusing on simply keeping the equipment they have working and "relatively" current. we cannot undo what has already been done. but the hospitals, at least in my opinion, cannot agree to financial suicide by agreeing to this contract.
After paying nurses

Lakeville, MN

#13 Jun 29, 2010
$35 per hour is on their base wage. But, in nursing, shift differentials and other non-base wage incentives drive the hourly earnings up significantly more. Now, they want to add restrictions on who they can serve driving up not only the amount of staff required to serve patients, but driving up the demand for those differentials and bonuses already in the contracts. The nursing union is not telling the whole story. The impact is a reduced work load and greater pay without renegotiating these rates. This is deception, plain and simple.
rndmcrzyktty

Minneapolis, MN

#14 Jun 29, 2010
Health Care wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong wrong wrong.
The 2 year is the bare minimum to be a not top notch RN. Four year is the standard
Most hospitals require a 4 year RN degree now, not many can find jobs with just a 2 year degree anymore.
28 years as RN

Anoka, MN

#15 Jun 29, 2010
Health Care wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong wrong wrong.
The 2 year is the bare minimum to be a not top notch RN. Four year is the standard
"not top notch" I went to 2 yr. program first and finally got my 4 year degree. Regardless of the number of years the program, everyone has to take the same licensing test to be a RN
Good Riddance

Minneapolis, MN

#16 Jun 29, 2010
If the strike is truly about patient care, then why are they hurting those very patients?

And why do they refuse to budge on salary, benefits and pensions (who gets those anymore, anyway?)?

Wake up & read the newspaper. People are lucky if they still have jobs and can pay their mortgages. Wage, benefits and pension increases in this economy make you look both greedy and stupid, frankly.

If you think public sympathy will be on your side, you are sadly mistaken.

Good riddance, please bring in nurses who realize how good they have it and don't just stand on the sidelines whining.

“Ahhhh hee ahw”

Since: Aug 09

Twin Cities

#17 Jun 29, 2010
Don't do it.

All it takes is ONE nurse to shout "scab", and the whole lot of you are instantly union thugs
you are crazy

Hastings, MN

#18 Jun 29, 2010
Health Care wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong wrong wrong.
The 2 year is the bare minimum to be a not top notch RN. Four year is the standard
Your comment is VERY offensive to all 2 year RN's. I happen to be one of them. Some of the best RN's I work with have 2 year degrees. 4 year is not the standard.
what

Hastings, MN

#19 Jun 29, 2010
rndmcrzyktty wrote:
<quoted text>
Most hospitals require a 4 year RN degree now, not many can find jobs with just a 2 year degree anymore.
Then why have I been able to find 2 hospital jobs in the last 2 years with "only" a 2 year degree? The first one was as a new grad, second with only 1 year of experience. 2 year RN's can do anything a 4 year can in a hospital setting. Check your facts.
Tay

Saint Paul, MN

#20 Jun 29, 2010
Dave from Lakeland wrote:
<quoted text>
An RN is only a 2 year degree. A 4 year is a different program
An RN is NOT only a 2 year degree. It IS a 4 year program. I know. My mom is an LPN (which IS a TWO YEAR) going for her RN. Get your facts straight!

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