New Judge Executive For Jessamine Cou...

New Judge Executive For Jessamine County - Amen!

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Since: May 09

Lexington, KY

#1 Jan 14, 2010
http://www.citynews-johnpmartin.com/Tucker-Fo...

Mark wants to serve the people and not be self serving!
Voter

Lexington, KY

#2 Jan 14, 2010
And you think running a carpet care business makes him qualified? I think not, what Judge Cassity has accomplished while in office is nothing less than amazing. Sorry but if he files for office I think it will be a waste of his time and money. Vote Cassity!
curley

Lexington, KY

#3 Jan 14, 2010
Voter wrote:
And you think running a carpet care business makes him qualified? I think not, what Judge Cassity has accomplished while in office is nothing less than amazing. Sorry but if he files for office I think it will be a waste of his time and money. Vote Cassity!
I agree with you.Judge Cassity is a good man and knows how to do his job. We had a mayor a few years back that annexed everything but lexington and if he could have he would have done it to. We need experience people not ones that are going to get this county so screwed up that we will never rebound from their mistakes like stupid street lights on main street that has cause nothing but problems fromthe git go.

Since: May 09

Lexington, KY

#4 Jan 15, 2010
Dear Curley,

Thank you for your comments.

Yes, Judge Cassity is a very nice man. Mr. Tucker is also a very nice man and a business man, too. Judge Cassity was a builder before he became Judge/Executive and he had served on some other boards. I believe he served on the water board and school board. To make a long story short, he has had about 20 years of on the job training. I am not going to bad mouth the judge, other than to say he, too, has made some very big mistakes over the years.

The mayor of Nicholasville under the commission form of government only has one vote, and the entire board voted for the annexation that actually started under Judge Cassity and the Fiscal Court. Yes, the mayor did work to install the traffic signals on main street and once again, so did Commissioner Meyer and Commissioner Welch at the time. Their departments helped with the installation. Mayor Martin worked just as hard to help get the traffic lights turned off. At least Mayor Martin does not have a problem admitting his mistakes and takes action to correct them. He was looking out for the safety of the people, and the Commonwealth of Kentucky conducted the traffic engineering study and determined at the time they felt there was a need. You will find during his term in office more jobs were created than any time in recent history.

Once again, Thank you very much for your comments.
WTF

Lexington, KY

#5 Jan 15, 2010
PeopleAdvocate wrote:
http://www.citynews-johnpmarti n.com/Tucker-For-Judge-Executi ve.html
Mark wants to serve the people and not be self serving!
Former Mayor Martin,
Please tell us Mr. Tucker's qualifications to be judge executive and not just Judge Cassity's perceived shortcomings.

Since: May 09

Lexington, KY

#6 Jan 15, 2010
Thank you for you questions regarding my qualifications.

I have been a business owner in Nicholasville for many years. I owned the Shoe store on Oak St. and have owned A D Carpet Care Inc. for nine years. I have been involved in lobbying for new laws, and to have laws changed in the Ky House and Senate over the past eight years. I have helped run campaigns for Governor, Congress, national Senate races, and many local races, Mayor, House Rep, Commissioner, and others. I am the sixth district chairman for Ky Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (a Department of Defense Volunteer position). I have worked with the Boy Scouts of America in district positions, and I was on the Nicholasville Housing Authority board.

Thank you once again.

Mark Tucker
Calling all candidates

Lexington, KY

#7 Jan 15, 2010
will he answer the thread "10 questions for candidates in Nicholasville’s upcoming election"
trueblue

Lexington, KY

#8 Jan 15, 2010
PeopleAdvocate wrote:
Dear Curley,
Thank you for your comments.
Yes, Judge Cassity is a very nice man. Mr. Tucker is also a very nice man and a business man, too. Judge Cassity was a builder before he became Judge/Executive and he had served on some other boards. I believe he served on the water board and school board. To make a long story short, he has had about 20 years of on the job training. I am not going to bad mouth the judge, other than to say he, too, has made some very big mistakes over the years.
The mayor of Nicholasville under the commission form of government only has one vote, and the entire board voted for the annexation that actually started under Judge Cassity and the Fiscal Court. Yes, the mayor did work to install the traffic signals on main street and once again, so did Commissioner Meyer and Commissioner Welch at the time. Their departments helped with the installation. Mayor Martin worked just as hard to help get the traffic lights turned off. At least Mayor Martin does not have a problem admitting his mistakes and takes action to correct them. He was looking out for the safety of the people, and the Commonwealth of Kentucky conducted the traffic engineering study and determined at the time they felt there was a need. You will find during his term in office more jobs were created than any time in recent history.
Once again, Thank you very much for your comments.
Has the former Mayor also admitted to wasting money for a parking lot that no one even used on walnut street until it was given to the health department. And as more jobs I can believe that because of the small town he had built on brannon crossing that he annexed right next to lexington that took that much more of our land to fill it full of concrete and blacktop. He also was the one that said when he got into office that he would control growth and did a 360 and annexed more land for business and homes than the former Mayor had in three terms. I checked out the sight that was at the start of this topic and all he does is bash everyone that is not in his click and then claims to be a CHRISTAIN. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you Mr. Martin.
show me the money

Lexington, KY

#9 Jan 15, 2010
March 14, 2009

The Nicholasville City Commission is mulling over a request made by Bellerive Development which would postpone a $100,000 payment owed to the city in 2009 and push it back to 2012.

When Bellerive annexed the north side of Jessamine County to build Brannon Crossing, it agreed to pay the city $500,000 up front, with subsequent $100,000 payments each year until 2011.

A sluggish economy was the primary reason that Attorney Robert Gullette, representing Bellerive Development, approached the city with the request.

Since it first opened, several stores, such as Goody's, have pulled out of the location, and anticipated housing development in the area fell through, Gullette said.

"Without the homes, businesses in Brannon have found it very difficult to develop and keep customers," he said.

Gullette said since the agreement was reached in 2005, his client has paid the $500,000 up front and $100,000 in 2007 and 2008.

"We're not asking to skip the payment," he added. "We're just asking to push it back."

If the city elects to grant the request, it would have to amend its current budget because the $100,000 payment was factored into it, Finance Officer Laurie Young said.

Commissioner Betty Black asked if the city did agree to push the payment back, would it recoup additional monies in the form of interest.

Gullette indicated that was certainly something that could be negotiated between the two sides.

Commissioner Johnny Collier said the city needs to come up with an interest rate and bring it to Bellerive Development. The commission agreed that some form of interest must be paid if it decided to extend the payment because that would be fair to the taxpayers.

Acting City Attorney Ellen Miller, who was sitting in for Bill Arvin, told Gullette that before she could advise the commission, she would have to see the letter of credit from the bank.

According to city Planning Commission Director Greg Bohnett, a letter of credit is what ensures the city will get the money coming to it.

"It guarantees the payment in case the developer cannot make payments," Bohnett said.

Toward the end of the discussion, Mayor Russ Meyer said the subject would be on the next agenda to be voted on by the commission.

"If no extension is given, the city can recall the $300,000 anytime," he added.
show me the money

Lexington, KY

#10 Jan 15, 2010
Largest annexation in city's history effective today
October 19, 2005
Nicholasville grew by more than one and half square miles today as a result of the largest annexation in the city's 193-year history.
According to City Clerk Roberta Warren, the annexation of 12 parcels of land on the east side of U.S. 27 - totaling 992.17 acres - became effective with the publication today in this newspaper of an annexation ordinance enacted last Friday by Nicholasville's mayor and city commissioners.
The property includes the site of the Brannon Crossing Centre, currently under construction, which is expected to be one of the largest outdoor shopping malls in the Bluegrass region, as well as new residential development.
The annexation stretches Nich-olasville's city limits to the Fayette County line, and the planned developments in the area will mean the end of the scenic agricultural landscape that separated Nicholasville and Lexington. It may also mean millions of dollars in new revenue annually for the city and county governments and a greater burden on those governments.
The annexation and plans for developing the area have long been controversial. More than three years ago, developer James Hughes of Nicholasville proposed the construction of the shopping center and an office park to the Jessamine County government and then later added plans for hundreds of houses. Even before the county fiscal court approved the zoning requests and development plans, Hughes approached the city about annexing the property.
He wants the land in the city, he has said, because the city allows higher density of housing development than the county does in that area, and it offers liquor licenses, which would attract large restaurants to the retail center.
Being in the city would also guarantee city services, and for those Hughes has been willing to pay. Early on, he offered the city government an incentive of $1,500 per residential unit at the time each building permit is issued, and offered to donate land for a police and fire station and build it. He also offered the school district 15 acres for a new school, although school officials said they would prefer not to locate a school in the area for several years.
Following negotiations, first with Mayor John Martin, and later with a committee that included Commissioners Russ Meyer and Chris Moore, City Attorney William Arvin and Nicholasville Planning Commission Executive Director Greg Bohnett, Hughes and his partners, including developers Kenny Angelucci and Joe Coons, agreed to changes in the plan.
Instead of building a police and fire station, city officials wanted $1 million instead, to be earmarked for public safety expenditures. The developers finally agreed to pay the city $500,000 at the time of annexation and $100,000 each year over a five-year period. They agreed to continue the $1,500 residential incentives until the city enacts impact fees on new development, at which time they would pay the fees or the incentives, whichever is higher. The city would hold the 15 acres for the school district for seven years, and if the schools didn't build on it by that then, the property would become the city's. The city would also get another six acres for a neighborhood park.
show me the money

Lexington, KY

#11 Jan 15, 2010
Largest annexation in city's history effective today - continued

In July, the city approved the intent-to-annex ordinances for more than 1,100 acres along U.S. 27 and Ashgrove Road on the condition that the city get binding agreements from the developers regarding the promised incentives.
At that time, Mayor John Martin said he was pleased with the deal he and other city officials had worked with Hughes and the other developers.
"I think we just set a precedent for the whole state. I hope it's a good one," he said.
The negotiations had been tedious, with disagreements over the design and minimum square footage of the more than 1,600 houses to be built adjacent to the shopping center. But in the end, Martin said, "It was almost everything I wanted."
Following the intent-to-annex ordinances and the recommendation by the planning commission for the approval of the zoning changes, the Nicholasville City Commission took up the issue again last month. The deal almost came unraveled, however, when there were what Hughes described as "some internal difficulties" that did not involve any conflict with the city.
The first reading of the annexation and zoning ordinances had received unanimous approval, but when the ordinances were brought before the board for a final vote on Sept. 22, attorney Robert Gullette Jr., representing Hughes' company, Bellerive Development, said his clients were "not able to go forward."
Then last Wednesday, a proposal involving most of the land originally proposed for annexation was brought before the board, which approved it on a unanimous roll call vote. The officials also approved several zone map amendments related to the proposal. Other annexations and zone changes are expected in the near future.
Hughes said at the end of last month that development of the Brannon Crossing Centre is on schedule, and that he is confident the first stores will open by the target date of March 1 of next year.
Currently under construction are a Kroger supermarket, a Goody's department store, a multi-screen movie theater and about 20 smaller stores. He is also negotiating, he said, for three other big stores.
Hughes has told officials that the development will bring in millions of dollars in payroll and property taxes, far more than the costs to the city and county of providing public services for it, according to his calculations. Police and fire protection by the city will begin immediately, and the city will also be responsible for streets. Many other services will be provided by other entities, such as a rural water district, Lexington's sewage treatment plant and a rural electric cooperative.
Hughes has said he will make highway improvements to U.S. 27 and Brannon Road in the vicinity of the new shopping center and office park.
The adjoining residential development is expected to displace more than 100 residents in the Ashgrove Estates mobile home park, owned by Kenny Nolan. The trailers, which have been there for many years, will be removed, and the land will be used for more expensive single-family residences.
Copyright: The Jessamine Journal 2005
show me the money

Lexington, KY

#12 Jan 15, 2010
Largest annexation in city's history effective today - FIRST SECTION FOR POST ABOVE

October 19, 2005

Nicholasville grew by more than one and half square miles today as a result of the largest annexation in the city's 193-year history.

According to City Clerk Roberta Warren, the annexation of 12 parcels of land on the east side of U.S. 27 - totaling 992.17 acres - became effective with the publication today in this newspaper of an annexation ordinance enacted last Friday by Nicholasville's mayor and city commissioners.

The property includes the site of the Brannon Crossing Centre, currently under construction, which is expected to be one of the largest outdoor shopping malls in the Bluegrass region, as well as new residential development.

The annexation stretches Nich-olasville's city limits to the Fayette County line, and the planned developments in the area will mean the end of the scenic agricultural landscape that separated Nicholasville and Lexington. It may also mean millions of dollars in new revenue annually for the city and county governments and a greater burden on those governments.

The annexation and plans for developing the area have long been controversial. More than three years ago, developer James Hughes of Nicholasville proposed the construction of the shopping center and an office park to the Jessamine County government and then later added plans for hundreds of houses. Even before the county fiscal court approved the zoning requests and development plans, Hughes approached the city about annexing the property.

He wants the land in the city, he has said, because the city allows higher density of housing development than the county does in that area, and it offers liquor licenses, which would attract large restaurants to the retail center.

Being in the city would also guarantee city services, and for those Hughes has been willing to pay. Early on, he offered the city government an incentive of $1,500 per residential unit at the time each building permit is issued, and offered to donate land for a police and fire station and build it. He also offered the school district 15 acres for a new school, although school officials said they would prefer not to locate a school in the area for several years.

Following negotiations, first with Mayor John Martin, and later with a committee that included Commissioners Russ Meyer and Chris Moore, City Attorney William Arvin and Nicholasville Planning Commission Executive Director Greg Bohnett, Hughes and his partners, including developers Kenny Angelucci and Joe Coons, agreed to changes in the plan.

Instead of building a police and fire station, city officials wanted $1 million instead, to be earmarked for public safety expenditures. The developers finally agreed to pay the city $500,000 at the time of annexation and $100,000 each year over a five-year period. They agreed to continue the $1,500 residential incentives until the city enacts impact fees on new development, at which time they would pay the fees or the incentives, whichever is higher. The city would hold the 15 acres for the school district for seven years, and if the schools didn't build on it by that then, the property would become the city's. The city would also get another six acres for a neighborhood park.

Since: May 09

Lexington, KY

#13 Jan 15, 2010
Dear Trueblue,

Thank you very much for your comments.

Actually, the land you are talking about is now the property of the Jessamine County Board of Health and it was not given to them. The parking lot is used by persons visiting the Health Department.

The parking lot was approved by the board at the time it was to be constructed. The sale of the property to the board of health was approved by the board, also. As I said before, the mayor only has one vote in the commission form of government.

The small town you referenced has brought several millions of dollars into the city/county in taxes, incentive fees, and created many jobs. More jobs are coming.

The present administration has spent close to $500,000 of this money in the general fund this past year or so. This incentive money was supposed to be secured until needed for facilities or structures for the police, fire, or streets so existing taxpayers didn't have to pay for the new growth.

We also implemented a moratorium on annexation.
Certain criteria were to be met by the developers in an effort to slow down growth. That is when I came up with the idea of incentive fees to help pay for the services new growth would need and as a way to keep existing taxpayers from having to pay for the new growth. The board at that time liked this idea.

As I said in an earlier response, the county had already decided to let the Brannon Crossing Center be built.

Thank you so very much for your comments as I said in the beginning of this reply.

God Bless you and yours.

John
trueblue

Lexington, KY

#14 Jan 15, 2010
PeopleAdvocate wrote:
Dear Trueblue,
Thank you very much for your comments.
Actually, the land you are talking about is now the property of the Jessamine County Board of Health and it was not given to them. The parking lot is used by persons visiting the Health Department.
The parking lot was approved by the board at the time it was to be constructed. The sale of the property to the board of health was approved by the board, also. As I said before, the mayor only has one vote in the commission form of government.
The small town you referenced has brought several millions of dollars into the city/county in taxes, incentive fees, and created many jobs. More jobs are coming.
The present administration has spent close to $500,000 of this money in the general fund this past year or so. This incentive money was supposed to be secured until needed for facilities or structures for the police, fire, or streets so existing taxpayers didn't have to pay for the new growth.
We also implemented a moratorium on annexation.
Certain criteria were to be met by the developers in an effort to slow down growth. That is when I came up with the idea of incentive fees to help pay for the services new growth would need and as a way to keep existing taxpayers from having to pay for the new growth. The board at that time liked this idea.
As I said in an earlier response, the county had already decided to let the Brannon Crossing Center be built.
Thank you so very much for your comments as I said in the beginning of this reply.
God Bless you and yours.
John
I am confused. I thought the people advocate was mark turner now it says john.
Ruonetwo

Lexington, KY

#15 Jan 15, 2010
I am confused too, R u the jpm that put the new roof on the city hall, if so is that against the ethics committee, also when you show on your website the campaing contrabutions why dont you explain yourself when you took contributions from the same people that you claim are the goood ole boy's yourself. You are full of crap quit trying to boost the other canidates they need all the help they can get, YOU are not helping them Dip $hit.
Ruonetwo

Lexington, KY

#16 Jan 16, 2010
Im sorry I talked with a friend it was your son that done the roofing job, excuse me, I still do not understand why you take money from the same people that you say are the good ole boy's, Look it up on his web site under campaign contrabutions It is very obvious he is a good ol boy too.Same money same people Ha Ha Ha .
Ruonetwo

Lexington, KY

#17 Jan 16, 2010
You will never be a Sam Corman Or a RUSS FOR US You are a one timer that took the ride with Bush, get over it LOSER, GOd bless you and your's.

Since: May 09

Lexington, KY

#18 Jan 16, 2010
trueblue wrote:
<quoted text>I am confused. I thought the people advocate was mark turner now it says john.
Dear Trueblue,

Sorry about the confusion. We won't do that again.

Mark responded on my computer!

John Martin

Since: May 09

Lexington, KY

#19 Jan 16, 2010
Ruonetwo wrote:
You will never be a Sam Corman Or a RUSS FOR US You are a one timer that took the ride with Bush, get over it LOSER, GOd bless you and your's.
Dear Ruonetwo,

You are absolutely correct! I will never be a Sam Corman or a Russ for Us! Nor would I want to be! I will not say anymore regarding these two men.

I will say this about your loser statement. At least I am trying to make a positive difference for the good people of Nicholasville and Jessamine County.

If you really knew me you would know that I am for truly for serving the people and not special interest and yes, some of the same people contributed to my campaign, because that is what some people do! No one got any special favors from me. As I have said before, I worked for the people not special interest!

You mentioned my son getting the roof job at city hall. I stayed out of that. I also left the room when the issue came up for vote.

The bidding process is open to anyone who qualifies. Elected officials just need to know when to do the right thing and abstain from voting for things that are unethical or even gives the appearance of being unethical, for this very reason. Because, uninformed people sometimes rush to judgment like you have and make false or uneducated statements.

His bid I was told was $10,000 less than the next lowest bid. So, this job was a win-win for Nicholasville.

It appears you have no plans to vote for me, however, That is what is so wonderful about the United States of America. We still have freedom of choice.

I will say this about your statement regarding President Bush. I think history will prove he was a far greater President than he has being given credit for.

I sincerely thank you once again for your comments and the opportunity to respond.

God Bless you and yours.

Sincerely,

John P. Martin
Former Mayor City of Nicholasville
Candidate for Mayor of Nicholasville 2010
thoughtful

Nicholasville, KY

#20 Jan 16, 2010
Yes Mr. Cassity has done a fine job and is a fine man, but democrats that stand with Obama, which is shown by their continuing to call themselves democrats need out of office and true conservatives need voted in.

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