False River Drawdown
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Geeze

Baton Rouge, LA

#1 Jan 15, 2010
What are the thoughts regarding a possible drawdown (feet/length of time not determined) during winter months designed to:

1) Dry up lakebed, kill off organic matter/slough off muck matter.
2) When restored, would allow necessary vegetation/aquatic life to regenerate, hence promoting a healthy lake environment.
3) Allow for necessary repairs to homeowners structures which would/may be exposed.
4) Little or no cost to parish.

Not saying this is going to happen, but is being done around the nation to combat the problems lakes experience so it is not something that is extreme or unusual.

I'd like to ask for opinions and thoughts. How can it help, what could it hurt. I hope people don't freak at the notion and this get out of control. Just a discussion on how this may or may not benefit False River.

People will experience inconveniences but from what I understand, it will be short lived. The potential payoff may be long term lake health and potential significant fish population increase.
xxxx

Erwinville, LA

#2 Jan 15, 2010
I say they should not have killed the vegatation in the first place.
Island Boy

Folsom, LA

#3 Jan 15, 2010
Geeze wrote:
What are the thoughts regarding a possible drawdown (feet/length of time not determined) during winter months designed to:
1) Dry up lakebed, kill off organic matter/slough off muck matter.
2) When restored, would allow necessary vegetation/aquatic life to regenerate, hence promoting a healthy lake environment.
3) Allow for necessary repairs to homeowners structures which would/may be exposed.
4) Little or no cost to parish.
Not saying this is going to happen, but is being done around the nation to combat the problems lakes experience so it is not something that is extreme or unusual.
I'd like to ask for opinions and thoughts. How can it help, what could it hurt. I hope people don't freak at the notion and this get out of control. Just a discussion on how this may or may not benefit False River.
People will experience inconveniences but from what I understand, it will be short lived. The potential payoff may be long term lake health and potential significant fish population increase.
Couple of questions. How much of a draw down? How much water do you have at your bulkhead? How long will this go on? The winter would be a perfect time. I hardly ever use my boat landing in the winter.
just a neighbor

Covington, LA

#4 Jan 16, 2010
you may not use your boat during the winter but some of us still do. the river is a lot less crowed with all of the drunks in there baja's and jet skes.
Beehive

Jennings, LA

#5 Jan 16, 2010
That would be the the tradeoff in this scenario. Sacrifice the long-term health of the lake or sacrifice a winter of boating.
John Doe

United States

#6 Jan 17, 2010
Beehive wrote:
That would be the the tradeoff in this scenario. Sacrifice the long-term health of the lake or sacrifice a winter of boating.
why a winter draw down? is it to help kill the vegetation so that in warmer months it could grow better? I could see that. Or is it so the "kid can play in their big toys in the summertime" Summertime is warmer for having to get into the mud and an water to fix piers and bulkheads. Not everyone wants to pay and arm and a leg for a contractor to do it. Summer would be better for construction I think worse for vegetation. Warnings would have to be posted all over due to underwater obstructions that would be safe at higher levels then being closer to the surface after drawdown. Could see many accidents no matter what time of year it would be done. How low will the lighthouse canal allow the water to fall before the water on the otherside flows back in the river? Might not be able to draw it down but so much. Removing the pressure on the water side of bulkheads could cause damage from too much hydrostatic pressure on the backside. Drawdown would have to be slow over many days. Rainfall would screw up the plan. If you draw it down below all the illegal sewage pipes there would be a real mess at the end of all those sh!t pipes. And the smell. I think that would expose another major problem in the river. Big piles of paper and sh!t in front of those nice camps.
Cracker Jack

Folsom, LA

#7 Jan 17, 2010
John Doe wrote:
<quoted text>
why a winter draw down? is it to help kill the vegetation so that in warmer months it could grow better? I could see that. Or is it so the "kid can play in their big toys in the summertime" Summertime is warmer for having to get into the mud and an water to fix piers and bulkheads. Not everyone wants to pay and arm and a leg for a contractor to do it. Summer would be better for construction I think worse for vegetation. Warnings would have to be posted all over due to underwater obstructions that would be safe at higher levels then being closer to the surface after drawdown. Could see many accidents no matter what time of year it would be done. How low will the lighthouse canal allow the water to fall before the water on the otherside flows back in the river? Might not be able to draw it down but so much. Removing the pressure on the water side of bulkheads could cause damage from too much hydrostatic pressure on the backside. Drawdown would have to be slow over many days. Rainfall would screw up the plan. If you draw it down below all the illegal sewage pipes there would be a real mess at the end of all those sh!t pipes. And the smell. I think that would expose another major problem in the river. Big piles of paper and sh!t in front of those nice camps.
You make a lot of valid points. Who wants mud flats anytime of the year in front of that expensive property. Bulkheads failing, poo-poo smelling. Not me and I bet not to many. You so smart Mr. Doe.
Beehive

Baton Rouge, LA

#8 Jan 17, 2010
We would probably lose more tourist dollars if this was done during the warmer months.
Beehive

Baton Rouge, LA

#9 Jan 17, 2010
Also, the exposed muck would smell alot worse baking in the summer heat.
comment

AOL

#10 Jan 18, 2010
what are you going to do with the millions of gallons of water,mud,sludge and sewage. its not called lake po-po for nothing. it goes back to disposal areas and dredging. when you stir up all those sludge deposits you may release toxic chemicals built up from years of agricultural runoff. maybe we could put it all on the thousands of acres drained for a previous polititian that started the decline of the lake and added lots of builtup pesticides into the river.i'm more concerned that the parish address the clogged canals that are getting worse and causing back-up in neighborhoods.we need to correct these canal problems befor we look at draing the lake.we need these canals addressed first.
egg

Baton Rouge, LA

#11 Jan 18, 2010
comment wrote:
what are you going to do with the millions of gallons of water,mud,sludge and sewage. its not called lake po-po for nothing. it goes back to disposal areas and dredging. when you stir up all those sludge deposits you may release toxic chemicals built up from years of agricultural runoff. maybe we could put it all on the thousands of acres drained for a previous polititian that started the decline of the lake and added lots of builtup pesticides into the river.i'm more concerned that the parish address the clogged canals that are getting worse and causing back-up in neighborhoods.we need to correct these canal problems befor we look at draing the lake.we need these canals addressed first.
So which came first the chicken or the egg?
comment

AOL

#12 Jan 19, 2010
i believe it was the fox that killed the chicken and left no eggs. the fox did well and grew fat.
Mike

Newark, NJ

#13 Jan 24, 2010
Wonder what spike major, Johnny Ewing,and Andy langlois would have to say about a drawdown n summer? I'm an island boy myself and thought I favored it. There would have to b a lot of silt removed. But the thought of increased chemical contaminaton is a problem. I grew up on this lake, I am 50 years
old. This is a political game. Most recreationers like it j55ust the way it is. Your out of town jetskiers don't spend sh-t here .We need our aquatic vegatation back at least
along the banks. This would also save bulkheads by decreased wave action. But mostly bring this lake back to a first-class fishing destination thereby generating much more revenue.
Just Wondering

Jennings, LA

#14 Jan 24, 2010
Mike wrote:
Your out of town jetskiers don't spend sh-t here
It is very hard to go some place and not spend anything. I'm talking about things like gas and fast food, not a shopping spree at K Park. And keep in mind that we get more than out of town jet-skiers...keep in mind all the wealthy out of towners with camps. I can't say for sure, but if I was one of them, I probably wouldn't want to spend my summer weekends here if a drawdown was to take place at that time of year.
Mike

Brooklyn, NY

#15 Jan 24, 2010
Just wonderin:-I respect ur viewpoint. I am assuming this drawdown will b a one time event. There would b
no other reason to have one. There is no grass to kill. There are many so many pros n cons to this. I do not think the wealthy camp owners will abandon a long term solution that will increase thier wealth r enjoyment for maybe generations to come. If this cost us nothing which I doubt, why not? But again u worry about wealthy people not the well being of our lake r local heritage. Do we not deserve a lake that can sustain itself? This ridiculous bouy situation actually crams high speed pwc's into less area. U sure u ain't one of those Big Three!?
Just Wondering

Baton Rouge, LA

#16 Jan 24, 2010
Mike wrote:
Just wonderin:-I respect ur viewpoint. I am assuming this drawdown will b a one time event. There would b
no other reason to have one. There is no grass to kill. There are many so many pros n cons to this. I do not think the wealthy camp owners will abandon a long term solution that will increase thier wealth r enjoyment for maybe generations to come. If this cost us nothing which I doubt, why not? But again u worry about wealthy people not the well being of our lake r local heritage. Do we not deserve a lake that can sustain itself? This ridiculous bouy situation actually crams high speed pwc's into less area. U sure u ain't one of those Big Three!?
I simply think that if a drawdown were done, it would make more sense and have less of an impact if it were done during the winter. I don't have an opinion on whether or not a drawdown should be done, and I won't pretend like I know exactly what would happen to the lake if the sediment was stirred up. All I am saying is that I personally think it would hurt our community to do such a thing during the summer.
comment

AOL

#17 Jan 24, 2010
its a crazy idea.period.summer,winter or fall.the only way to decrease silt is to dredge and remove to settling ponds.since nobody can provide this area its a moot point.also silt will continue into the lake with every rain anyway.dredge out the canals and help homeowners now and put funds to good use. if we expect this great influx of people with the bridge,increase drain age flow on clogged canals.
just a neighbor

Covington, LA

#18 Jan 25, 2010
fine draw the lake down. kill the aquatic growth that the smaller bait fish use as cover. that attracts the bigger fish. i was in the lake yesterday. in the canal that i live on it is barely one foot deep. and in fron of jims it was no better. had to pull boat out because i thought it would be sitting in mud if i didn't. hell why don't we just close the lake during the winter. we are sitting on a gold mine but very few people can see it. there use to be big name fishing tournaments on this lake. now it is just locals who compete unless it is a company tournament. the cookie jar tournaments are fine. but these men and women spend there money here anyway. why can we see about bringing in some outside money. with a certain percentage going back in to the lake for restocking purposes and maintaince of exsisting public structures that benefit the people of pc and the lake.
Not So

Baton Rouge, LA

#19 Jan 25, 2010
Look at the bright side. If they would draw the lake down for a couple of months during the hottest part of summer and close the lake to all traffic except idle speed only during the draw down they would more than likely save a couple of lives from drunk on drunk crime. The mud would dry up and solidify bulkheads could be repaired. Sewer systems repaired. Piers repaired. Can you imagine all the treasure hunting everyone would be doing? Think we could find the old wagon trail at the south end?
amigodilago

Opelousas, LA

#20 Jan 25, 2010
If it is too good to be true it is worth taking a closer look before buying it hook, line and sinker. Draw-downs all over the country are done for one primary purpose only: control of undesirable vegetation without having to use expensive chemicals. When has any one of you found last any out-of-control vegetation in False River?
And before some forists here rush to claim, that the parish "killed" the grasses by spraying, they should think again. The only spraying that was done targeted a bad Hydrilla infestation using a herbicide specific to this bad species. It was only done close to shorelines at the south flats and it did only temporarily kill Hydrilla and none of the good grasses that were still growing at the time. It had to be repeated annually. It was paid for by property owners and performed by Wildlife and Fisheries. It was stopped some 10-15 years ago when it was apparent, that all type of grasses were being killed of by the heavy silt loads coming into the flats through the M-1 and M-2 canals. This silt problem continued unabated since that time. Silt particles cloud the water and restrict the penetration of sunlight, which interferes with the plant metabolism. In addition, it is possible, that the silt is not just inert but it contains residual herbicides and pesticides that have been washed with surface run-off from surrounding farmlands. Such materials if present would further contribute to the grass killing.

The draw down proposed in this forum would do absolutely nothing to remove even one lick of silt and therefore accomplish very little if anything towards ecological restoration of the lake. Under ideal circumstances, the exposed sediment would dry and settle somewhat. But this effect is only temporary and would be reversed soon after it is re-flooded. Homeowners with houses built all along the shoreline would be well advised to document the conditions of their properties before and after such draw downs in case damages are caused by the settling process.

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