Ohio.com - School secretaries get raise in Akron

There are 8 comments on the Akron Beacon Journal story from Sep 11, 2007, titled Ohio.com - School secretaries get raise in Akron. In it, Akron Beacon Journal reports that:

Akron school secretaries will receive a 3 percent raise in each of the next two years under an agreement approved Monday by the school board.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Akron Beacon Journal.

APS Parent

Brecksville, OH

#1 Sep 11, 2007
When I voted to pass issue 17(Akron Public School tax levy) and to help the contexts of the children and that is also including my own. Last Fall I saw in the ABJ that the superintendent received a pay raise not even a month after the levy passed, I was really ticked off and now I see that the Admin/Secretary's are getting a raise. What about our children, when are they going to receive help, (books) or update the school. I (Parent) can't walk down Garfield High Schools hallways between class periods without being elbow to elbow with students. I think the overcrowding at Garfield is ridiculous, no wonder the learning environment is so hostile and the city wonders why the reading level and learning ability is low.The class sizes are to BIG. Hello, wake up and smell the coffee. Closing down Central High School was the wrong solution. With the whole city of Akron paying a school tax levy, Akron Public could have kept Central High School open and Garfield, Buchtel, and East wouldn't have the problems it has today. Someone needs to take another look at the budget and do something with our high schools. I am not opposed about giving raises but the amount that has been given to the superintendant was astronomical. I and other parents want to see results in our high schools.
LilOne

Hyattsville, MD

#2 Sep 11, 2007
Again...a situation where a union drives a pay increase where monies would be better spent elsewhere...like on educating kids.

Without the unions, the secretaries in the district wouldn't be dehumanized and taken advantage of....they would be paid a fair market wage, and there would still be people lining up to fill every vacancy. If they paid too little, they wouldn't get the quality workers that they needed.
Bruce Banner

Barberton, OH

#3 Sep 11, 2007
There was plenty of noise to keep Central open to avoid overcrowding but greed and the want for new buildings overshadowed those needs of the children. Now APS will have to deal with overcrowding as the APS Parent stated and deal with low test scores because the teachers will have less time to dedicate to students because they will be checking their attendance to see who is in class. Way to use the money APS, give people raises who have yet to prove that they can effectively turn around a failing program. Maybe the Browns GM could do a better job.
Alex

Shippingport, PA

#4 Sep 11, 2007
What part of the Imagine Akron program don't you folks understand. The money provided to APS was on condition that they bring class sizes to an minimum classroom size - among other things. If APS didn't agree to the conditions, the mony would not be made available to them.

Seems to me that considering the community is not willing to support the schools and replace and repair 70 years old buildings, Imagine AKron was the only option available to them.

There's an entire website on the Imagine Akron project on the APS website. It might do one good to actually understand the program before complaining about it.
Just my opinion

Akron, OH

#5 Sep 11, 2007
LilOne wrote:
Again...a situation where a union drives a pay increase where monies would be better spent elsewhere...like on educating kids.
Without the unions, the secretaries in the district wouldn't be dehumanized and taken advantage of....they would be paid a fair market wage, and there would still be people lining up to fill every vacancy. If they paid too little, they wouldn't get the quality workers that they needed.
Thank goodness they have the union, otherwise, the school board would only take avantage of the secreatries, which is why for 1 year they would not negotiate with them until it got down to the point they were going to consider going on strike. It is a good thing there are still a few union jobs left out there, it keeps employers from taking adavantge of the poor workers/employees. This area would be doing alot better if there were still more union jobs around, now it is a matter of the employers screwing the little guy and no one to stop it. I know people who were fired because they were extremely sick and missed 2 days of work, even with a doctors excuse; or how about the poor guy in the paper yesterday who was fired because he had a workers comp claim; employees who have been let go from their job, even though they performed their job properly, just because they don't like you. This is an "At Will State, meaning the employer doesn't have to have a good reason to let someone go. So good for the secretaries, this 3% is only keeping up with the cost of living. I take it that LilOne didn't read the article about Thompson Electric, they claim the reason their business has been so successful was because of the relation with the Union.
Bruce Banner

Barberton, OH

#6 Sep 11, 2007
Alex wrote:
What part of the Imagine Akron program don't you folks understand. The money provided to APS was on condition that they bring class sizes to an minimum classroom size - among other things. If APS didn't agree to the conditions, the mony would not be made available to them.
Seems to me that considering the community is not willing to support the schools and replace and repair 70 years old buildings, Imagine AKron was the only option available to them.
There's an entire website on the Imagine Akron project on the APS website. It might do one good to actually understand the program before complaining about it.
Dude, what part of overcrowding don't you understand? Read the posts before you attack someone. We are allowed to complain if we want. We were responding to the article on how the secretaries are getting raises and how "Biggie Smalls" got a raises, yet he has not made any improvements to raise the education bar. Closing a newer high school was not the answer. Overcrowding classrooms is not the answer. We want that money to go to the people who need it and that is the students of APS and not the administrators.
LilOne

Hyattsville, MD

#7 Sep 11, 2007
Just my opinion wrote:
<quoted text>
Thank goodness they have the union, otherwise, the school board would only take avantage of the secreatries, which is why for 1 year they would not negotiate with them until it got down to the point they were going to consider going on strike. It is a good thing there are still a few union jobs left out there, it keeps employers from taking adavantge of the poor workers/employees. This area would be doing alot better if there were still more union jobs around, now it is a matter of the employers screwing the little guy and no one to stop it. I know people who were fired because they were extremely sick and missed 2 days of work, even with a doctors excuse; or how about the poor guy in the paper yesterday who was fired because he had a workers comp claim; employees who have been let go from their job, even though they performed their job properly, just because they don't like you. This is an "At Will State, meaning the employer doesn't have to have a good reason to let someone go. So good for the secretaries, this 3% is only keeping up with the cost of living. I take it that LilOne didn't read the article about Thompson Electric, they claim the reason their business has been so successful was because of the relation with the Union.
Sometimes it works...sometimes it doesn't. This isn't a typical company. This is a school district, funded by taxes...not company profits. Voters support tax increases in order to better the education of their children...and the union lobbies for that money away to be gived to the secretaries as a pay increase instead.

Do the secretaries deserve an increase? I can't speak to that. I believe that increases should be earned, not expected. I've worked in companies where we didn't turn a profit, and we received no pay increase as a result...not even for Cost of Living.

I believe that, in a tax-funded school district, money should be spent first on bettering education in the form of hiring qualified teachers, providing necessary books and supplies, and improving the environment first. Administrative increases should come only after those things are addressed to the public's satisfaction, or should be put on a separate ballot.

The union should not be able to negotiate where my educational tax dollars are spent.
Just a Thought

Parkville, MD

#8 Sep 12, 2007
To put this in perspective, in the last two years every social security recipient has had a COLA of 4.1% and 3.3%. The next COLA will be announced in October, and based on current numbers it should be over 3% as well.

So, the teachers, administrators and secretaries at the Akron Public Schools have agreed to raises that are on average less than the raise each and every senior on social security gets just for being alive.

And people are complaining that this is 'excessive'?

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