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“Got to repel the liberal horde”

Since: May 07

Elgin, IL

#21 Sep 10, 2009
Ron wrote:
I am still an employee of Panduit and have been for many years. I do not agree with your comment, but that is your opinion. This is the greatest job i have had, and i have raised my family quite well because of Panduit and it's benefits, etc. I feel that I work for a great company, that is smart, and destined to remain strong through these tough times, even if that makes making tough decisions. You have to keep in mind that Panduit is not the only company that is relocating divisions, etc in order to stay strong and stay alive.
It's probably pretty safe to assume that you are not employed at either NL or WC. If you were you're opinion of the company would be quite a bit different right now. Perhaps you should try talking to some of them. I began my employ at Panduit when I was 22 years old. Over the next 19 1/2 years I felt I owed the company for giving me a break no other employer did at the time. I quickly moved up from a machine operator to setup/repair, toolroom, then Electrical Tech in the Maintenance dept. The company used to make it easy to move up. Panduit allowed me to afford the things I have today and helped make me the skilled person I am. Unfortunately, I often found it necessary to point out waste and silly decisions in order to help save the company money and therefore preserve the security of my job and those I worked with. My struggle ended in December '08 with the first wave of layoffs, after John Caveney told us all was well. I worked in the Maintenance department of the Terminal Division. I saw first hand the huge amounts of money that company poured down a bottomless pit. That's why it saddens me today to see many of my ex-coworkers and friends wondering what to do, especially couples who both work there. I hope you can hold onto your job while others are wondering when the next shoe will drop. The amount of money it will cost to ship the equipment from NL to Mexico will be astounding. There is some extremely expensive and heavy equipment in that plant from plastic injection molding machines to tin and nickel plating equipment and 25 to 250 ton stamping presses. Sadly, because of the way things were being run in that plant it was plain to see, and I predicted in the past few years, that the Terminal Division building would not be Panduit in 10 years. Management beat my prediction by about 8 years.
Outside Eyes

Reddick, IL

#22 Sep 11, 2009
Interesting posts out here. I thought I'd share my story. I am an experienced senior executive, Ivy leage masters degree, global reputation, a seasone executive who has helped numerious companies change and reduce costs.

About 1.5 years ago I interviewed with Panduit in Tinly Park. I met and spoke to several executives there and met their "process improvment people". Hours of discussions. You see, interviewing at my level is a mutual thing... I must evaluate them as they evaluate me. My personal conclusions were this. The leadership team at Panduit are behind the times in thought process and the culture inhibits decision making. There's no rocking the boat to make things better and inhibitions to speak out. I won't say they are timid yes-men but that is the impression I received. This type of culture generally leads to a slow death downward spin. The top-tier executives never hear whats going poorly and never receive any push back. Being far removed from where the rubber hits the road, their guidance then is based upon intuition as opposed to actual data (good or bad).

I concluded the culture was not one I desired to be part of for the above reasons. It's no surprise to me to hear about whats going on there today. Most loyal blue collar people who have spent a majority of their careers there will indeed take the impact of all this. The job market is no longer there to absorb them nor pay them what they were making. Today, most jobs are not career long jubs but rather more like assignments. It's not untypical for these people to end up changing jobs from here on out every two years or so. It is a shocking experience, an angry experience, a rejecting experience and then acceptance is finally achieved. They in time will realize that they themselves are what's most important to their famlies and not the company they provide value to.

It's hard to tell a life long blue collar worker that they need to be retrained. Savings are generally not there and a paycheck each week is needed. None the less, I recommend they take the funds from the state to go get up to date training in something? A new career? A new technology certification? Finish college? It's tough to do but in today's economy you need to be a jack of all trades.

Understand too, those first let go from any company "always" get the best treatment and package. Every layoff from then on gets less and less. It's a cold business reality. Panduit paid you for work you did. They owe you nothing for your future now. It does nothing to help their business at this point. Know that...remember that.

God Bless and good luck...

“Got to repel the liberal horde”

Since: May 07

Chicago, IL

#23 Sep 11, 2009
Outside Eyes wrote:
My personal conclusions were this. The leadership team at Panduit are behind the times in thought process and the culture inhibits decision making. There's no rocking the boat to make things better and inhibitions to speak out. I won't say they are timid yes-men but that is the impression I received. This type of culture generally leads to a slow death downward spin. The top-tier executives never hear whats going poorly and never receive any push back. Being far removed from where the rubber hits the road, their guidance then is based upon intuition as opposed to actual data (good or bad).
Interesting you would say that. I, too, experienced that. My boss refused to take my suggestions any higher because it was an unwritten law that you didn't question the burning bush and he told me so. I was instructed to do what I was told, no matter how much money it wasted because, "That's what they wanted." The Caveneys may not have really wanted it that way, but that's what they have.
Outside Eyes wrote:
Understand too, those first let go from any company "always" get the best treatment and package. Every layoff from then on gets less and less. It's a cold business reality. Panduit paid you for work you did. They owe you nothing for your future now. It does nothing to help their business at this point. Know that...remember that.
God Bless and good luck...
Becasue I had 19 years in at Panduit, I got 20 weeks severance in December. It definitely helped but I was sh!ttin' kittens because I had no guarantee I'd find anything in that time. I never felt Panduit owed me anything. I did feel I owed them to help them stay in business by helping the company save money. Unfortunately, money saving suggestions had to cost zero dollars, regardless if the solution would cost less than the problem. All savings had to be immediate. No long term savings were ever considered. Now we know why. It would appear management at the Terminal Division was in a race to bring costs down before the deadline to close the plant. That must have been a lot of pressure... The results seem to have been tragic in one case.
Terminal

Wheaton, IL

#24 Sep 11, 2009
Hey Ron, Would you still say that if your plant was closing? And like you, I raised my family and enjoyed life while working for Panduit. But after all those loyal years and all the hard work I'm out of a job. Just like that. And you know Ron, I felt like I worked for a great company too. Not anymore. It's sad what greed does to people. By the way I've been with Panduit 30 plus years.
WBR

Yorkville, IL

#25 Sep 11, 2009
It's funny the new headquarters is still on schedule.

“Got to repel the liberal horde”

Since: May 07

Chicago, IL

#26 Sep 17, 2009
WBR wrote:
It's funny the new headquarters is still on schedule.
The new headquarters was started and contracts were signed before the announcement in early Novemeber that they would be reducing staff world-wide by 3%. Strangely, though, our annual October Quality Month visit by John Caveney left all of us feeling great because he told us everything was well and the company was growing at 8% while our competitors weren't growing at all. Two months later I was met at the door of the guard-shack by our plant manager and HR. They handled all of us like criminals. Two security guards were there when I walked in. Their conversation with me was quick and dirty. As I found out later they were in a hurry to get to a meeting with the rest of the employees to break the news to them. It used to be a great place to work. Greed and a lack of respect for their fellow man has taken over. I can't believe Jack Caveney likes any of this.
Facts

Broadview, IL

#27 Sep 17, 2009
JR in Crest Hill wrote:
<quoted text>
The new headquarters was started and contracts were signed before the announcement in early Novemeber that they would be reducing staff world-wide by 3%. Strangely, though, our annual October Quality Month visit by John Caveney left all of us feeling great because he told us everything was well and the company was growing at 8% while our competitors weren't growing at all. Two months later I was met at the door of the guard-shack by our plant manager and HR. They handled all of us like criminals. Two security guards were there when I walked in. Their conversation with me was quick and dirty. As I found out later they were in a hurry to get to a meeting with the rest of the employees to break the news to them. It used to be a great place to work. Greed and a lack of respect for their fellow man has taken over. I can't believe Jack Caveney likes any of this.
Been there & done that myself. The real lesson is for folks to understand (a) There is no such thing as job security (b) Companies are not there for employees...they are there for business (c) Only niave people believe the company owes you anything at all

Pick yourself up, dust yourself off and move on. Don't look back. Why? Because no one cares if you do. Really.... it's only you who cares.

I've been the guy picking those to say good bye to and the guy said good bye to. Both sides are tough to do. Remember, it's not what happens to you, it's how you respond to it that matters.

As for your Jack Caveney... either he's worried about his own job or what he's going to tell the people still there. Trust me, he's not thinking about you for sure.

You'll be fine in time... Move on to your future!
sad but true

Paso Robles, CA

#28 Sep 28, 2009
JR in Crest Hill wrote:
<quoted text>
The new headquarters was started and contracts were signed before the announcement in early Novemeber that they would be reducing staff world-wide by 3%. Strangely, though, our annual October Quality Month visit by John Caveney left all of us feeling great because he told us everything was well and the company was growing at 8% while our competitors weren't growing at all. Two months later I was met at the door of the guard-shack by our plant manager and HR. They handled all of us like criminals. Two security guards were there when I walked in. Their conversation with me was quick and dirty. As I found out later they were in a hurry to get to a meeting with the rest of the employees to break the news to them. It used to be a great place to work. Greed and a lack of respect for their fellow man has taken over. I can't believe Jack Caveney likes any of this.
For whatever it's worth (not much, I know), when John Caveney gave his Quality Month talk, we WERE doing that much better than out competitors. The slide in the September - November timeframe was ASTOUNDING, unprecedented, and took everyone by surprise. The fact that it looks as if the electrical industry is going to remain at this level even after the overall economy recovers means that the company is looking for a fundamental shift in how it makes its money. Panduit is contractually obligated to move forward with the new HQ, so there's no sense in paying millions for an empty lot. Believe it or not, Panduit IS still doing better than most of its competitors (at least on the electrical side), but a quick perusal of those competitors will tell you that that's a little like saying Panduit has only lost 7 pints of blood instead of 9. Continuing to try to carry the same load of expenses with the level of sales coming in would mean driving the company into the ground. Sadly, this is about survival of the company.
Resident

Naperville, IL

#29 Sep 29, 2009
"sad but true"...you take this personal which is a mistake. Will Rogers once said, "A Banker will only loan you their umbrella, until it starts to rain!".

Panduit is no different than any business. They will only loan you a job, until it starts to rain. It's raining.

If you're over 40, you grew up in a different time. Company loyality, employee loyality, job security, pensions, etc... Today, things are mighty different. It's business period. Jobs must be viewed as a loan and it must be understood that they are temporary. Colleges today teach that you will change jobs about every 3 years in today's world. Companies no longer provide pensions and shortly, no longer will provide health insurance. It is and will be all up to you personally to secure your life style.

You need to stop looking back at Panduit with saddness. You are in the real world right now.

I was caught up in the Commonwealth Edison (deregulation) in the late 90's. Then we had 18,000 employees and the CEO made $700,000/yr.
(Remember how deregulation was going to save us all money?<lol) Today it's called Exelon and every division is now a seperate company.(It did not take them long to figure out how to scam us). They now have 8,000 employees and the CEO made $27,000,000 last year.

Panduit is under different circumstances but the moral is the same to us regular folks. All jobs today are temporary. Be loyal to yourself and your family. Taking care of employees is something from the past.
Perplexed

La Grange Park, IL

#30 Sep 29, 2009
Why doesn't everyone in management take a pay cut from the top down?
Dick Ears

Bolton, Canada

#31 Sep 30, 2009
This is very dissapointing. The employees of the Terminal Division are the nicest people you'll ever meet. I wouldn't be suprised if Romeoville, Burr Ridge, and Lockport are next.
Niave

Naperville, IL

#32 Sep 30, 2009
Dick Ears wrote:
This is very dissapointing. The employees of the Terminal Division are the nicest people you'll ever meet. I wouldn't be suprised if Romeoville, Burr Ridge, and Lockport are next.
Put "nice person" on a resume and see how far that gets you with a company.

Life is not fair and you move on. Remember: 50% of people do not want to hear about your problems and the other 50% are glad you have them!
Shiny happy people

La Grange Park, IL

#33 Oct 1, 2009
Niave wrote:
<quoted text>
Put "nice person" on a resume and see how far that gets you with a company.
Life is not fair and you move on. Remember: 50% of people do not want to hear about your problems and the other 50% are glad you have them!
Good attitude! You must be upper management!
Kinda

Downers Grove, IL

#34 Oct 2, 2009
Huh wrote:
We can't tax our way to success nor can a business operate with no profit margin...
Look forward not backward. Get out there and fight any politician (Dem or Repub) who does not support lowering taxs on a business. Our is the highest in the world. Help a business stay profitable and you help jobs remain right here!
The United States has the second highest corporate tax rate among the 30 countries in the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). But because the United States has so many generous special tax preferences for businesses, it collects the fourth lowest corporate tax revenues as a share of GDP among all OECD countries.
So, the effective tax rate is among the lowest.
Yep

United States

#35 Oct 2, 2009
Perplexed wrote:
Why doesn't everyone in management take a pay cut from the top down?
Really? Well, a few reasons... First, it's a business declining situation. Cuts are temporary and it may be "years" before recovery takes place. The company probably had long term plans to move too. Second, it's not just salary. Each and every employee (on average) costs the company 40% of the salary in services, training, benefits, etc...$100k salary costs the company $140k. In your example a 10% cut yields $10k. If you cut the job, it's $140k savings.

Remember, these are "business" decisions...people fall at a much lower priority. Sad but true.
Ironic

Reddick, IL

#36 Oct 3, 2009
(Look at the date of this artical?)

Source: Southtownstar.com
Friday, September 11, 2009

The wiring and communications company will reduce jobs in its southern U.S. plants.
Panduit recently expanded its manufacturing facility in Alajuela, Costa Rica, in 14.000 square meters, an investment worth several million.

Tom Donovan, company president, blamed the economy for the decision: "It was a tough decision that we had hoped we wouldn't have to make, but we cannot ignore the effects of the economy on the electrical market in general and on the lowering demand for our electrical products in particular", reported website Southtownstar.com .

Since: May 09

Wolcott, IN

#37 Nov 28, 2009
I heard its under new owners. Yeah they call them mobsters. OOHPS I let the cat out of the bag. Never mind!!!
Know the truth

Markham, IL

#38 Oct 22, 2013
Looking at this today and knowing what I know now I realize just what Panduit is. Panduit is run by the Human Resource department who have no clue as to what goes into manufacturing product. The work force is treated worse now more than ever. It is only fitting that it is more expensive to manufacture product in Mexico and Costa Rica. The people there have a different way of life and do not step in line like in the USA. Equipment is damaged and destroyed because of ignorance. The management team is helpless as far as decision making goes. HR controls all. This company will be a memory soon. All US manufacturing operations are leaving to go overseas. Only the palace on I-80 will be left with a spattering of other resources. Time to start looking for a new job... good luck. This is the worst time to be looking thanks to the socialist in the White House. I am have been looking and want to get off this ship before it goes under. JJC knew what is coming that is why he bailed.
Richard

Markham, IL

#39 Nov 18, 2013
Too bad it is costing Panduit much more to manufacture production in Mexico and Costs Rica. The quality is horrific and it is getting worse instead of better. I will be surprised if there is any manufacturing done by Panduit in the USA in three years. The plans are already in motion to move remaining operations to Europe and Mexico.
The stockpiling has begun to build a cushion while they move equipment. Another once great company moving out of the US because of greedy politicians taxing us to death to pay for idiotic programs.
Time to check the job market out.
Old employee

Montréal, Canada

#40 Mar 26, 2015
Richard wrote:
Too bad it is costing Panduit much more to manufacture production in Mexico and Costs Rica. The quality is horrific and it is getting worse instead of better. I will be surprised if there is any manufacturing done by Panduit in the USA in three years. The plans are already in motion to move remaining operations to Europe and Mexico.
The stockpiling has begun to build a cushion while they move equipment. Another once great company moving out of the US because of greedy politicians taxing us to death to pay for idiotic programs.
Time to check the job market out.
I worked as a Territory Account Manager for Panduit for 9 years. The first three years business grew rapidly and in 2009 John Caveny invited all 1000 sales people out to Mexico to celebrate the company's success and plan for the future. Then the crisis hit and the company struggled to adapt and organize itself internally. After laying people off every two years for six years I was finally caught in the mix. Of course the company will continue on but now that John and Jack Caveny are gone; and the remaining brothers are getting old and never really directed the company; this company will be inevitably sold. The main problem is that even though they hire top people, they don't empower them to make the necessary changes to improve. I don't know how many times I spoke to managers aware of a good solution but not allowed to execute it. The CEO never had the vision, he puts you to sleep when he talks. He is just a loyal family friend and watchdog. Most people remaining are clinging to the company's original vision which is still relevant today even though they are not empowered to execute. Two acquisitions were made but poor execution has resulted in almost no sales. When you join this company the pitch they give you is so exciting you can't wait to hit the ground running.... but after several years you realize that you can't deliver everything you promised the customer. The story you can to tell the customer is so damn good though, people cling to it enthusiastically for years.

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