LETTERS -- State Budgets, Nassau County

LETTERS -- State Budgets, Nassau County

There are 25 comments on the Newsday story from Jun 4, 2008, titled LETTERS -- State Budgets, Nassau County. In it, Newsday reports that:

Teachers nurture students' skills This letter is in response to Janine Perri's essay, "A memo to my teacher's ," [Expressway, May 31]. I am an English teacher at Bay Shore High School.

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LI Teacher

Brooklyn, NY

#1 Jun 4, 2008
Timmy S. Grippo must have his head up his rectum for making the generalization "Those who are employed to teach our children or administer standards have their priorities in what's in their wallet first and teaching second." It is quite obvious that he has no clue as to what goes on in the schools and who the teachers really are. It does not surprise me any more that Newsday would print such a characterization. This paper is a rag and I'm sure the Dolans will bring it down another notch to try and get circulation up. Tim if you are reading this I feel sorry for you, please get some counseling to deal with your bitterness. Everyone who comes in contact you will benefit. Yes I'm a teacher, I love my job and my students love my class.
Ms Motl

King Of Prussia, PA

#2 Jun 4, 2008
I'm not sure Janine made a blanketed assumption about recieving a poor education. Rather, her essay asks some very interesting questions. Your letter is the first of all the recent posts that attempts to give an answer instead of attack her.

you wrote;

"They are burned out from correcting so many grammatical and spelling errors. They are growing weary from the new "technical" language (i.e. "texting")."

If this is truely the case with our teachers we have a bigger problem than a little punctuation mark.
Fed up NYer

Corona, NY

#3 Jun 4, 2008
If as you say, teachers are "burned out from correctins so many grammatical and spelling errors", then who should be blamed? Is it not your job to teach these kids how to spell and write? Isn't that what being a "teacher" is? Or is the teacher in the grade prior to yours who did not teach these kids the one who failed them? If your feelings match those of the majority of teachers in todays world, our children are in a lot of trouble. That is scary.
Truth

Hauppauge, NY

#4 Jun 4, 2008
Right on Doug, let the market deal with it. I only wish the government would listen and stop manipulating.
LILI

West Nyack, NY

#5 Jun 4, 2008
How many times should a teacher teach these things? I taught English for many years. When I found a mistake, I would cross it out and correct it. I would also include a little note on the paper mentioning that there were some mistakes in the writing that I had corrected. Some students would hand in their "edited" copy the next day, complete with all the same mistakes. I am referring to high school students, mind you.

No offense, but when I was a student, if a teacher pointed out a mistake and corrected it for me, you had better believe that I would not make the identical error on my "good" copy. Also, being corrected one time was usually enough for me to never make the mistake again.

Poor spoken English grammar is another pet peeve, also because nobody pays any attention. If I had a dime for each time I gently corrected a user of the term "it mines," only to have them say it again moments later, I would be a multimillionaire today.

Keep blaming the teachers, people. Then send your kids on job interviews and have them respond "it mines" when asked "Whose resume is this?" Or, you could remind your kids to pay attention to the corrections made by their teachers. Better yet, make an effort to write and speak properly yourself, so that proper grammar extends beyond English class.

I have to go now. My husband just said "youse" instead of "you" and I must smack him in the head.
SSGT BIll

AOL

#6 Jun 4, 2008
When Janine's letter originally appeared is the Sunday Newsday I blogged that she must have had a Catholic grammar school education as the teachers there would not stand for this derelction of a teacher's duty. Now along comes Ms. Motl and introduces the typical liberal tactic of changing the subject even going so far as to say "texting" is the problem. If you can't handle the chore of correcting spelling errors the students in your class have a major problem. In other words if you can't handle the heat get out of the kitchen Ms. Motl. And like I said the other day in my blog, if you are reading this Janine, "you go girl".
LILI

West Nyack, NY

#7 Jun 4, 2008
I forgot to mention one very important fact. While I cannot speak for Long Island schools, as I was never "good enough" to get a job here, there is an awful new policy in New York City. We are no longer allowed to correct our students' papers. Instead of crossing out errors as I used to, I must now leave my students' papers untouched and instead write comments on a Post-It. Now, if kids did not pay any attention when their errors were corrected on their actual papers, do you think they are really going to go searching for mistakes that are mentioned in a Post-It? Would they even be able to find them, anyway, if they made the mistake in the first place? Whatever. These directives are handed down by Regional Instructional Superintendents who cannot write or spell properly, either, so I guess I should not be surprised.
B M Ryan

Colleyville, TX

#8 Jun 4, 2008
When I went to school, there was a huge sign posted in front of the class. "NEATNESS COUNTS". A paper, even if 100% correct, could be downgraded if sloppy. Try that today. A teacher would be tarred and feathered. The prime policy these days is, "Don't hurt the poor little dear's feelings" All kids should bat, no matter if they are not able to do it. Children should be allowed to fail. It builds character, and prepares them for the real world, where they must get up, dust themselves off, and try harder.
Fed up NYer

Corona, NY

#9 Jun 4, 2008
LILI wrote:
I forgot to mention one very important fact. While I cannot speak for Long Island schools, as I was never "good enough" to get a job here, there is an awful new policy in New York City. We are no longer allowed to correct our students' papers. Instead of crossing out errors as I used to, I must now leave my students' papers untouched and instead write comments on a Post-It. Now, if kids did not pay any attention when their errors were corrected on their actual papers, do you think they are really going to go searching for mistakes that are mentioned in a Post-It? Would they even be able to find them, anyway, if they made the mistake in the first place? Whatever. These directives are handed down by Regional Instructional Superintendents who cannot write or spell properly, either, so I guess I should not be surprised.
Unfortunately I have heard this from many teachers on Long Island. Completely ridiculous. Whoever makes these directives should be fired immediately.
Domenica

United States

#10 Jun 4, 2008
Ms Motl wrote:
I'm not sure Janine made a blanketed assumption about recieving a poor education. Rather, her essay asks some very interesting questions. Your letter is the first of all the recent posts that attempts to give an answer instead of attack her.
you wrote;
"They are burned out from correcting so many grammatical and spelling errors. They are growing weary from the new "technical" language (i.e. "texting")."
If this is truely the case with our teachers we have a bigger problem than a little punctuation mark.
And I assume that all the kids that say ax instead of ask have a speech impediment.
JKZ

Medford, NY

#12 Jun 4, 2008
What Ms. Motl is saying, to all you idiots who cannot read, is that it's enough already. These students are drilled and drilled to no avail. Parents and the general public are at fault for this horrendous abuse of our language. Do not youse agree?
Antonia

Medford, NY

#13 Jun 4, 2008
This teacher's frustrations are warranted beyond belief. As a middle school teacher, I must have corrected the spelling of "our" (supposed to be "are") a million times. Teachers can only do so much. When these kids go home, they are exposed to poorly written newspapers (ahem), friends who speak in "text," and to parents who could not care less about either. Tim Grippo is a moron. I'll leave it at that. I am too angry to keep writing. Yes, Tim, it's all a massive plot against the taxpayers! You've watched "Taxi Driver" too many times.
Antonia

Medford, NY

#14 Jun 4, 2008
Ms Motl wrote:
I'm not sure Janine made a blanketed assumption about recieving a poor education. Rather, her essay asks some very interesting questions. Your letter is the first of all the recent posts that attempts to give an answer instead of attack her.
you wrote;
"They are burned out from correcting so many grammatical and spelling errors. They are growing weary from the new "technical" language (i.e. "texting")."
If this is truely the case with our teachers we have a bigger problem than a little punctuation mark.
You proved my point! Learn how to spell "receiving"!
The book

Kingsport, TN

#15 Jun 4, 2008
Ah, yes. The Teacher Wars.

How many of you parents back up the teachers and take an interest in your child's progress, and how many of you are ignoramuses who are afraid that your own children might surpass you?

I was born in 1961, and throughout my entire public school career, it was understood that the home was my parent's domain, and the school was my teacher's. My parents put their trust (overwhelmingly earned) in the teachers to do whatever was necessary to ensure our educational success.

When I was in the 8th grade, I made the mistake of missing a deadline, and by the time I got home, my mother was waiting for me to give me hell because my teacher called her regarding my transgression. I can vividly remember that, and many other similar situations. There was never any question- in nearly every dispute, my parents backed-up my teachers 100%.

Today, I am a successful professional with a good life and a comfortable income. No child, left to their own devices, will consistently flourish in school without a solid partnership between teachers, family and community.

My parents were depression-era survivors, and made untold sacrifices to leave the city for LI, where they knew we'd get the best education available. They kept on our tail to make sure we would get the most out of what the schools had to offer. I hated it at the time, but I appreciate it all now.

Thanks, to all my teachers and concerned adults, and most of allm thanks Mom & Dad!
Ms Motl

King Of Prussia, PA

#16 Jun 4, 2008
Antonia wrote:
<quoted text> You proved my point! Learn how to spell "receiving"!
Thank you for pointing out my error. I will be more careful in the future.

Had this type of response been provided when errors were pointed out to the school, I don't think this would be such an issue.
Kim

United States

#17 Jun 4, 2008
Stand your ground Janine. Accept nothing but the best. No matter what these people say. It's all window dressing.
Jamie

Katonah, NY

#18 Jun 4, 2008
As being a student, I think that what Janine is saying obviously stating is that it is a bad thing to make grammatical mistakes. However, everybody makes mistakes even in grammar. It's just a part of life. Nobody is perfect and I think everyone knows that. SORRY WE CAN'T ALL BE PERFECT IN GRAMMAR LIKE YOU. You're just making it bigger than it really is.
Ernam

Wayne, NJ

#19 Jun 4, 2008
Ms Motl wrote:
I'm not sure Janine made a blanketed assumption about recieving a poor education. Rather, her essay asks some very interesting questions. Your letter is the first of all the all the recent posts that attempts to give an answer instead of attack her.
you wrote;
"They are burned out from correcting so many grammatical and spelling errors. They are growing weary from the new "technical" language (i.e. "texting")."
If this is truely the case with our teachers we have a bigger problem than a little punctuation mark.
**********
Talking about correcting grammar and spelling errors?
Perhaps you should learn how to spell yourself (like the word "RECEIVE") prior to typing your comments!
Ernam

Wayne, NJ

#20 Jun 4, 2008
(My comments started after **** above)

Talking about correcting grammar and spelling errors?
Perhaps you should learn how to spell yourself (like the word "RECEIVE") prior to typing your comments!
Ms Motl

King Of Prussia, PA

#21 Jun 4, 2008
Thank you for pointing out my error. I will be more careful in the future.

I was talking about teachers being burnt out and growing weary being a problem. It seemed as if the teacher was using this as an excuse. I agree that there is no simple answer and we ask alot from our teachers. Thank you for all your efforts.

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