Thursday's West Islip Board of Ed Agenda

Thursday's West Islip Board of Ed Agenda

There are 260 comments on the Patch.com story from Feb 14, 2013, titled Thursday's West Islip Board of Ed Agenda. In it, Patch.com reports that:

The West Islip School Board of Education will hold its montly meeting on Thursday at 8 p.m. at West Islip High School.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Patch.com.

Occupiablespace

West Islip, NY

#125 Feb 20, 2013
Special educator wrote:
<quoted text>
I think it is minor and petty in camparison to the scope of education in today's society. I think you should educate yourself about real issues facing our public school systems and rely on the educators in the buildings to teach the kids. If the resource room teacher has not gone to his/her director to object to the space, then the only logical thought is that the space is fine for his/her needs. If as you say the teacher doesn't speak up because he/she believes that will mean "making waves" then that teacher is not, in my educated opinion, doing his/her job, and THAT is what you should be objecting to.
In my world, larger problems do not discount "minor or petty" problems. The two can exist at the same time and one does not negate the other, it's still a problem regardless of how you define it. I happen to know a lot about issues facing our school systems and the issue I am questioning is the taxes we pay in conjunction with quality.
I am not going to question a teacher who did not create the environment. Their job is to make it work.
The people at the helm (the ones making large six figure salaries) and the elect, and a few others, created the environment.
Closing two ES schools at one time wasn't such a bright move considering that in order to make it work, utility closets had to be converted to learning space, space never intended for occupancy of children, for 30 minutes or otherwise, as reported by valerie.
You stick with your causes, worthy of attention, and I commend you, but I will focus on the "minor and petty" ones which you want to disqualify.
yakity yak

Bronx, NY

#126 Feb 20, 2013
Occupiablespace wrote:
<quoted text>
In my world, larger problems do not discount "minor or petty" problems. The two can exist at the same time and one does not negate the other, it's still a problem regardless of how you define it. I happen to know a lot about issues facing our school systems and the issue I am questioning is the taxes we pay in conjunction with quality.
I am not going to question a teacher who did not create the environment. Their job is to make it work.
The people at the helm (the ones making large six figure salaries) and the elect, and a few others, created the environment.
Closing two ES schools at one time wasn't such a bright move considering that in order to make it work, utility closets had to be converted to learning space, space never intended for occupancy of children, for 30 minutes or otherwise, as reported by valerie.
You stick with your causes, worthy of attention, and I commend you, but I will focus on the "minor and petty" ones which you want to disqualify.
Although it may be your opinion that the space being utilitzed is not occupiable for students, I believe that you can rest assured that it has been inspected and deemed as such. All of the building undergo regular inspections by the fire marshall. These inspections scrutinize everything from functioning exit signs and emergency doors to the hight and placement of art hanging in the hallways and things hanging from the ceilings. I am quite sure that if the space being utlized for learning regardless of previous use was considered unsafe or legally inappropriate it would in the past 5 months of inspections been changed.

You are however correct that where our children our considered there should be no issue considered "minor or petty", but your passion and energy would probably serve the children better in some other capacity of their academic well being.
have seen it

Marlboro, NJ

#127 Feb 20, 2013
Special educator wrote:
<quoted text>
I think it is minor and petty in camparison to the scope of education in today's society. I think you should educate yourself about real issues facing our public school systems and rely on the educators in the buildings to teach the kids. If the resource room teacher has not gone to his/her director to object to the space, then the only logical thought is that the space is fine for his/her needs. If as you say the teacher doesn't speak up because he/she believes that will mean "making waves" then that teacher is not, in my educated opinion, doing his/her job, and THAT is what you should be objecting to.
If you are really a special educator, which I don't believe you truly are, you would be aware that in many situations a "push-in" service would be more disruptive to a child than no service at all. The service of a school Psychologist should never be performed as a "push in" service under any circumstance. Furthermore, to assign a principal the task of creating space for resource rooms when there is no physical space available for additional rooms is unfathomable. That task is one that should have been addressed prior to the closure of TWO buildings, not after. Don't be quick to assume the special educators haven't complained to district administrators and to their union representitives.
dont talk back

Marlboro, NJ

#128 Feb 20, 2013
yakity yak wrote:
<quoted text>
Although it may be your opinion that the space being utilitzed is not occupiable for students, I believe that you can rest assured that it has been inspected and deemed as such. All of the building undergo regular inspections by the fire marshall. These inspections scrutinize everything from functioning exit signs and emergency doors to the hight and placement of art hanging in the hallways and things hanging from the ceilings. I am quite sure that if the space being utlized for learning regardless of previous use was considered unsafe or legally inappropriate it would in the past 5 months of inspections been changed.
You are however correct that where our children our considered there should be no issue considered "minor or petty", but your passion and energy would probably serve the children better in some other capacity of their academic well being.
Why aren't there fire marshall inspection certificates hanging in the buildings then?
Occupiablespace

West Islip, NY

#129 Feb 20, 2013
yakity yak wrote:
<quoted text>
Although it may be your opinion that the space being utilitzed is not occupiable for students, I believe that you can rest assured that it has been inspected and deemed as such. All of the building undergo regular inspections by the fire marshall. These inspections scrutinize everything from functioning exit signs and emergency doors to the hight and placement of art hanging in the hallways and things hanging from the ceilings. I am quite sure that if the space being utlized for learning regardless of previous use was considered unsafe or legally inappropriate it would in the past 5 months of inspections been changed.
You are however correct that where our children our considered there should be no issue considered "minor or petty", but your passion and energy would probably serve the children better in some other capacity of their academic well being.
That's fair, but my passion is not limited to the concerns of occupiable space, I can assure you of that. I am focused on quality for the amount of tax dollars we are paying, it doesn't simply revolve around closets. Save for a few numbskull teachers over the years, West Islip has been academically a very challenging and strong school district. I applaud the teachers the building principals and the support staff, always have, always will. In my own research I have learned that not even bathrooms are considered occupiable space, there are regulations that must be followed according to the IBC's.
A mother said that closets are being used as learning space, and reading that, shocked me to be honest with you. Not everything should be acceptable just because someone being a professional is making it work. I don't like that answer.
Where do we as tax payers draw the line? That is what I want to know.
I just can't accept kids learning in closets, it's not right, in this day and age, shouldn't we be doing better?
Special educator

West Islip, NY

#130 Feb 20, 2013
have seen it wrote:
<quoted text>
If you are really a special educator, which I don't believe you truly are, you would be aware that in many situations a "push-in" service would be more disruptive to a child than no service at all. The service of a school Psychologist should never be performed as a "push in" service under any circumstance. Furthermore, to assign a principal the task of creating space for resource rooms when there is no physical space available for additional rooms is unfathomable. That task is one that should have been addressed prior to the closure of TWO buildings, not after. Don't be quick to assume the special educators haven't complained to district administrators and to their union representitives.
Honestly, I do not care what you believe or do not believe about me. I was not refering to the school psychologist, I was referring to resource room, which is what this thread seemed to be focused on. I wonder how it is you believe the educators have complained to the administration and the union? Oh yes, I know they speak to you right? And tell you their problems so that you can come on here and complain about them. Right. Sure. Makes sense. Like I stated, if they do not believe the space is appropriate then they should be adult enough, and professional enough to have that conversation with the building administrator, the district administrator and then the superintendent. If not, they are not doing their duty as teachers. Certainly complaining to an anonymous blogger on topix is not the answer. As for now, I am off of this blog. Although my district was not called back to work this week, I have much better things to do with my time then to waste it here.
Occupiablespace

West Islip, NY

#131 Feb 20, 2013
have seen it wrote:
<quoted text>
If you are really a special educator, which I don't believe you truly are, you would be aware that in many situations a "push-in" service would be more disruptive to a child than no service at all. The service of a school Psychologist should never be performed as a "push in" service under any circumstance. Furthermore, to assign a principal the task of creating space for resource rooms when there is no physical space available for additional rooms is unfathomable. That task is one that should have been addressed prior to the closure of TWO buildings, not after. Don't be quick to assume the special educators haven't complained to district administrators and to their union representitives.
The mother named valerie said that closets were converted as resource rooms. So I think you are correct to assume that special educators who have to shut those big heavy and wooden utility doors, out of need for quiet and to prevent distraction, might find these unacceptable spaces to occupy.
Nut allergy

West Islip, NY

#132 Feb 20, 2013
Occupiablespace wrote:
<quoted text>
The mother named valerie said that closets were converted as resource rooms. So I think you are correct to assume that special educators who have to shut those big heavy and wooden utility doors, out of need for quiet and to prevent distraction, might find these unacceptable spaces to occupy.
I hope you stay away from the schools. The administrators and staff have meaningful work to do. This little quest is a personal tantrum that will only distract from hours better spent on delivering solid education to the WI students. Your intent seems to be to take another person's observations and twist them to manufacture a complaint. The good news is you couldn't find any valid problems to post about.
Occupiablespace

West Islip, NY

#133 Feb 20, 2013
Nut allergy wrote:
<quoted text>
I hope you stay away from the schools. The administrators and staff have meaningful work to do. This little quest is a personal tantrum that will only distract from hours better spent on delivering solid education to the WI students. Your intent seems to be to take another person's observations and twist them to manufacture a complaint. The good news is you couldn't find any valid problems to post about.
They do have very meaningful work, and thank goodness they can make it work, as what choice do they have, while working within a set of variables not of their own choosing or making.
I really do admire them.
Little quest? You are probably a BOE member or someone related to, or friends with, as you minimize, and are way too defensive over it. I'm not surprised. I expect as much. Children learning in closets is not valid to you perhaps, and mainly because it points to the quality we are not getting because of decisions made by those you are assoicated with. You're allowed to be protective of them, but it doesn't change the fact that because of what they have done, children who need resource room are learning in closets.
You
WI Resident

West Islip, NY

#134 Feb 20, 2013
Occupiablespace wrote:
<quoted text>
They do have very meaningful work, and thank goodness they can make it work, as what choice do they have, while working within a set of variables not of their own choosing or making.
I really do admire them.
Little quest? You are probably a BOE member or someone related to, or friends with, as you minimize, and are way too defensive over it. I'm not surprised. I expect as much. Children learning in closets is not valid to you perhaps, and mainly because it points to the quality we are not getting because of decisions made by those you are assoicated with. You're allowed to be protective of them, but it doesn't change the fact that because of what they have done, children who need resource room are learning in closets.
You
Since you obviosly read The Patch why dont you go back and re-read the posts from Joannie & Kelly.
have seen it

Marlboro, NJ

#135 Feb 20, 2013
Special educator wrote:
<quoted text>
Honestly, I do not care what you believe or do not believe about me. I was not refering to the school psychologist, I was referring to resource room, which is what this thread seemed to be focused on. I wonder how it is you believe the educators have complained to the administration and the union? Oh yes, I know they speak to you right? And tell you their problems so that you can come on here and complain about them. Right. Sure. Makes sense. Like I stated, if they do not believe the space is appropriate then they should be adult enough, and professional enough to have that conversation with the building administrator, the district administrator and then the superintendent. If not, they are not doing their duty as teachers. Certainly complaining to an anonymous blogger on topix is not the answer. As for now, I am off of this blog. Although my district was not called back to work this week, I have much better things to do with my time then to waste it here.
I don't hear about these problems, I live these problems 5 days a week working with these children each and every day.
The building administrators (principals) cannot make more room to accomodate us because there is no more room. The district administrators and superintendent have heard complaints from us and from parents. There is no room left in any of the buildings to accomodate all of the services which the district must provide for its students. Please be advised that the district will not use trailers for services.
Occupiablespace

West Islip, NY

#136 Feb 20, 2013
WI Resident wrote:
<quoted text>
Since you obviosly read The Patch why dont you go back and re-read the posts from Joannie & Kelly.
Valerie's post was a while ago. Valerie was not condemning the cozy space. Her post was in defense of the closets as cozy space.
Likewise, Joannie and Kelly.
My point isn't concerned with who thinks it's cozy or not, or those two ladies comments. My point is towards the bigger picture.
The bigger picture is the gross amount of tax payer dollars spent, closing to ES in one year, and as a result closets are being used as learning space. Like I said before, even bathrooms, according to the IBC, are not considered occupiable space. It's not that difficult to grasp.
I know there are lap dogs lurking around, that doesn't change a thing about the reality. You are so desperate to defend the indefensible.
repeat

Marlboro, NJ

#137 Feb 20, 2013
WI Resident wrote:
<quoted text>
Since you obviosly read The Patch why dont you go back and re-read the posts from Joannie & Kelly.
Valerie
9:18 am on Wednesday, February 20, 2013
And Joannie and Kelly just became a members last week! Bahaaaaaa!
So funny!-Valerie Rivera (who can care less who knows who I am!)
WI Resident

West Islip, NY

#138 Feb 20, 2013
repeat wrote:
<quoted text>
Valerie
9:18 am on Wednesday, February 20, 2013
And Joannie and Kelly just became a members last week! Bahaaaaaa!
So funny!-Valerie Rivera (who can care less who knows who I am!)
She was talking about you Mamamia you dingdong.
suburbiasue

West Islip, NY

#139 Feb 20, 2013
repeat wrote:
<quoted text>
Valerie
9:18 am on Wednesday, February 20, 2013
And Joannie and Kelly just became a members last week! Bahaaaaaa!
So funny!-Valerie Rivera (who can care less who knows who I am!)
It's too easy!
suburbiasue

West Islip, NY

#140 Feb 20, 2013
WI Resident wrote:
<quoted text>
She was talking about you Mamamia you dingdong.
repeat is talking about you! too easy! lmao!
Occupiablespace

West Islip, NY

#141 Feb 20, 2013
These people come on here only to distract. Ignore them.
Jessica Horvath

Brentwood, NY

#142 Feb 20, 2013
Fire Protection Requirements
All schools in New York state must provide adequate fire protection. Schools must be equipped with a sprinkler system that is present on every floor, in every room and has a central control station or mechanism. Schools also must be equipped with fire extinguishers, a fire alarm and detection system, and a smoke control system. All fire exit routes must be clear and clearly marked in New York schools.

Tandem Code Provisions
The New York State Fire Prevention and Building Code Council stipulates that all schools in the state meet the standards set by the plumbing, mechanical, property maintenance, and fire codes of the state. The plumbing code alone covers general requirements for buildings, as well as water heaters, fixtures, faucets, fixture settings and sanitary draining amidst its 13 chapters and eight appendices. A school must pass an inspection by a state official as per each of these codes to meet Building Code and be opened to the public.

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Effectiveness Requirements
Article 408-A of the New York state code provides that plans for all future elementary, junior high, and high schools must be presented to the commissioner of education and director of the budget for approval. Approval is contingent upon a planned school's ability to fulfill all the spatial and educational needs of students, while adhering to heating, ventilation, lighting, sanitation and health, fire and accident protection requirements. Schools must be economical enough for the state to afford, without sacrificing quality, and be constructed in such a way that any future additions or reconstruction will be easily facilitated and cost effective.

Other Provisions
As per Article 4-A of the New York code for public buildings, all public schools in New York must be handicap accessible. Article 4-C, effective Aug. 26, 2010, stipulates that all new public construction projects and renovations of existing public buildings, including schools, must adhere to green, or environmentally sensitive, building standards. Green building standards are to be developed by the Department of Environmental Conservation, the Department of Health, the Dormitory Authority of the state of New York, the Department of State, the Department of Education, and the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

Read more: New York State Building Codes for Schools | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_6800378_new-state-bu...
Jessica Horvath

Brentwood, NY

#143 Feb 20, 2013
I have to believe that since the schools are OPEN, they were INSPECTED and were deemed safe.

I cant speak for any other building, but I know the copy room is being used as instructional space. It is small but far from a windowless closet. THere are plenty of windows in that room, and should a fire break out, people could escape out of that window.

I hope this helps. You are right that these idiots come on here to bully and distract. If this issue really troubles you, do all you can to ease your mind. I dont know where your children go to school, but I feel that my children are completely safe at Oquenock.
meyer

Marlboro, NJ

#144 Feb 20, 2013
All the lap dogs can dish it out.
None can take it.
I'm with the poster who said you can't defend the indefensible. boe is indefensible. The 5 that shake in their seats and go along anything are just as bad as the two ringleaders. If you don't show for a vote b/c you're afraid to vote against but don't want to vote in favor, you're just as bad as the rest.

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