Indiana woman condemned for killing a...

Indiana woman condemned for killing at 15 going free

There are 5 comments on the WTHR-TV Indianapolis story from Jun 17, 2013, titled Indiana woman condemned for killing at 15 going free. In it, WTHR-TV Indianapolis reports that:

An Indiana woman whose death sentence for a killing when she was 15 years old helped change the way juveniles are treated by courts across the country is being released from prison.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at WTHR-TV Indianapolis.

GBism

Boiling Springs, SC

#1 Jun 17, 2013
So should people underage be able to commit any heinous crime imaginable and not be held responsible upon becoming adults because their brains weren't fully developed at the time? I think not.
While I know the judgment of a 16 year old might not be as sound as that of a 25 year old or older, being old enough to drive a car is old enough makes people able to know that sitting on a woman and cutting her 33 times with a butcher knife is a) wrong, b) a crime, and c) a really frigging bad decision that will adversely effect your own future.
I grew up poor and black in a less than ideal home- as did multitudes of our other law abiding citizens. I remember 16 well- the inescapable realities of the street, the overwhelming b. s. of adolescence, the pressures, the despair, the genuine everyday, all-day agonies of wanting and needing and never getting. I also knew better than every little stupid jerk move I ever engaged in back then, which, while legion, never crossed the line into the illegal, and never ever even came close to inflicting intentional torture and death upon another human being. Have I grown as a person since I was 16? Yes, but that doesn't magically erase the missteps of my youth either. I bear those scars and those consequences.
Personally, I'd support a federal ban on the death penalty for a whole bunch of reasons, not the least of which are the inevitable convictions of innocents by our justice system and the outrageous costs to our nation in money, reputation, and conscience. I'm also dead against giving second chances to murderers because a) it means the first murder is a freebie and b) the victims get no second chance to pick up the pieces and put life back together. Why should murderers have what they denied their victims?
This murderer needed to spend the entire rest of her life in prison, despite her potential, despite her degree, despite good behavior, despite finding God, despite how much she no doubt regrets her crime and getting caught for it. Life in prison equals paying her life for the life she took in the most humane way currently possible and would have been the closest thing to real justice done in this case.
Not to mention people have spent life in prison for far lesser crimes- like possession upon a third strike in Cali. How addicts who never harmed anyone but themselves do real life sentences while this torture/murderer walks free again- that's a crime in itself.
Linda Bedsore

Delaware, OH

#2 Jun 17, 2013
Is she black?
Linda Bledsoe

United States

#3 Jun 18, 2013
GBism wrote:
How addicts who never harmed anyone but themselves do real life sentences while this torture/murderer walks free again- that's a crime in itself.
First of all, I agree that drug offenses and addiction is not necessarily grounds for a life sentence. However, suggesting that an addict only harms themself speaks to your ignorance on the topic. Do some research on families affected by addiciton. There are a lot of victims. They just don't have stab wounds and bullet holes.
Seymour

Indianapolis, IN

#4 Jun 18, 2013
Linda Bledsoe wrote:
<quoted text>
First of all, I agree that drug offenses and addiction is not necessarily grounds for a life sentence. However, suggesting that an addict only harms themself speaks to your ignorance on the topic. Do some research on families affected by addiciton. There are a lot of victims. They just don't have stab wounds and bullet holes.
Agreed... Those members of society who chose what they conceived at the time as "the easy life" also should have consequences for their actions.
Seymour

Indianapolis, IN

#5 Jun 18, 2013
GBism wrote:
So should people underage be able to commit any heinous crime imaginable and not be held responsible upon becoming adults because their brains weren't fully developed at the time? I think not.
While I know the judgment of a 16 year old might not be as sound as that of a 25 year old or older, being old enough to drive a car is old enough makes people able to know that sitting on a woman and cutting her 33 times with a butcher knife is a) wrong, b) a crime, and c) a really frigging bad decision that will adversely effect your own future.
I grew up poor and black in a less than ideal home- as did multitudes of our other law abiding citizens. I remember 16 well- the inescapable realities of the street, the overwhelming b. s. of adolescence, the pressures, the despair, the genuine everyday, all-day agonies of wanting and needing and never getting. I also knew better than every little stupid jerk move I ever engaged in back then, which, while legion, never crossed the line into the illegal, and never ever even came close to inflicting intentional torture and death upon another human being. Have I grown as a person since I was 16? Yes, but that doesn't magically erase the missteps of my youth either. I bear those scars and those consequences.
Personally, I'd support a federal ban on the death penalty for a whole bunch of reasons, not the least of which are the inevitable convictions of innocents by our justice system and the outrageous costs to our nation in money, reputation, and conscience. I'm also dead against giving second chances to murderers because a) it means the first murder is a freebie and b) the victims get no second chance to pick up the pieces and put life back together. Why should murderers have what they denied their victims?
This murderer needed to spend the entire rest of her life in prison, despite her potential, despite her degree, despite good behavior, despite finding God, despite how much she no doubt regrets her crime and getting caught for it. Life in prison equals paying her life for the life she took in the most humane way currently possible and would have been the closest thing to real justice done in this case.
Not to mention people have spent life in prison for far lesser crimes- like possession upon a third strike in Cali. How addicts who never harmed anyone but themselves do real life sentences while this torture/murderer walks free again- that's a crime in itself.
While I believe in the death penalty, I also realize that our system of justice is no longer capable of fairly, efficiently and most of all "truthfully" able to utilize such a penalty. Our system has evolved into an inefficient system of justice geared towards money and power, thus a business for profit. Until someone comes along and seriously overhauls the current system, justice will continue to be a rarity in the true definition.

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