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Merrily TN

Nashville, TN

#1 Aug 2, 2006
Finally, I found "y-all"!
I have been looking all over the net for weeks now trying to find just a few acres with a decent house in the northeast region of ND; found 1 realtor with less than a dozen listings...where is everyone out there? I grew up in Michigan, and upstate NY, so I know about Cold, have lived in Florida, so I know Spanish (!), have lived in Oregon, so I know about Rain, have been a "hobby farmer" in rural Tennessee for 20 years so now I know "Nothing" (!).
Here, its not what you know but who you know, hell, its not even who you know, its who you're "kin" to... I've been an insurance agent for 12 years now, but make as much doing Mural art work as I do insurance. My husband has been a CDL driver for as long, and together we grow and wholesale blueberries...I want to know, from you folks who live in ND, everything about the northeast part of your state: good or bad, all comments and suggestions are welcome!
Mary

Bismarck, ND

#2 Aug 2, 2006
Merrily, I would go to www.discovernd.com this gives you an overview and links about ND.

www.gebbieinc.com is a listing of all newspapers in the world...go to ND daily and check out the Grand Forks Herald.

I would do some web searching on Grand Forks, ND...since this is the largest town in the N>E> part of ND. I'm sure you will find lots of info on the N>E> part of state. Good Luck
Ron

Williston, ND

#3 Aug 2, 2006
you will be moving to the coldest part of the state.

Marmarth is a good location.
Merrily TN

Nashville, TN

#4 Aug 2, 2006
Ron wrote:
you will be moving to the coldest part of the state.
Marmarth is a good location.
Ok, how cold is "cold" in northeast ND? And someone else on this site mentioned what's been in my mind as well...Global Warming making the north more moderate. Seen any early signs of that?
Merrily TN

Nashville, TN

#5 Aug 2, 2006
Mary wrote:
Merrily, I would go to www.discovernd.com this gives you an overview and links about ND.
www.gebbieinc.com is a listing of all newspapers in the world...go to ND daily and check out the Grand Forks Herald.
I would do some web searching on Grand Forks, ND...since this is the largest town in the N>E> part of ND. I'm sure you will find lots of info on the N>E> part of state. Good Luck
I will do that, and thank you. But what I really want to know they probably can't tell me, and that is what are the people like?
Are you a native? Would you say, "the natives are friendly"?
I've just had a gut full of the "Deliverance" mentality here:
Scottish descendents for 6+ generations, everyone's related,
(in more ways than one), and outsiders are not exactly welcome.
I'd hate to find The Job, The House, and the way of life no different...
Karen

Bismarck, ND

#6 Aug 2, 2006
Merrily, The natives are actually very friendly, but are not treated very well. Most natives live on the reservations scattered around the state, but many have gone on to colleges and own their own businessesand arevery much a reason why ND is the nice state it is. Indians are very passionate about their heritage and they are very welcoming when it comes to Pow wows, arts and craft shows, etc... Te majority of North Dakota residence are white. I'm gueesing, but I'm sure it is around 90 percent white, 9 percent native american, and 1percent mix of all other races. We like to think we are not a racist state, but we have our faults too...especially when it comes to judging our own native amercian neighbors. Most of our states reservations have built casinos with full vegas style gaming. Some people whine that it is North Dakota's downfall, but most people feel it has been a wonderful opportunity for Natives and Non natives to work, play, and share with each other. New Town, ND is a perfect example of how Natives and Non natives work, play and live together.
to karen

Dickinson, ND

#7 Aug 2, 2006
and your point is??
Ron

Williston, ND

#8 Aug 2, 2006
how cold? the southwestern part of the state has the 'balmiest' weather in the winter. The northeastern is by far the coldest. it will be ten above here, and some fifteen below in Grand Forks consistently.

the summers are the best. none better anywhere.

I've seen it 42 below zero. I've seen it 108 degrees in the shade. Floridians who were working here one summer said, "This is hot!"

Good scenery in the northeastern part of the state, Winnipeg is less than a hundred miles. A great city of more than 600,000. Manitoba is friendly.
Mary

Bismarck, ND

#9 Aug 3, 2006
Karens point is most of the residence of North Dakota are racist when it comes to Native Americans. Merrily was asking what the "natives" are like (meanining the general population of ND), and I think Karen thought she meant Natives as in Native Americans.
Mary

Bismarck, ND

#10 Aug 3, 2006
Merrily, Karen is probably right in what she was saying. On the other point about the general population of North Dakotans, most of us are very welcoming and don't pay any attention to people who come and go. However, I would say that if you moved into a very rural area away from a big town, some of the old time farmers would be curious and suspisous as to why anyone would want to move into rural ND, but once their curiosity is fulfilled, you will have a best frined for life. It is not "hillbilly" or "deliverance" mentality, more just curious and why would they want to move here. Even we ND natives laugh when we drive through a little ND town, and the locals know you are not from there, they stop and stare at you as you drive down their little main street wondering who the heck are and why are they driving down our little street in the middle of no where> LOL
Ron

Williston, ND

#11 Aug 3, 2006
when settlers and pioneers first came to what is now North Dakota, the natives and the newcomers liked one another. to paint it as rascist is stereotyping and narrow-minded.

French fur traders got along with the natives very well. a large number of metis with French surnames reside here.

open up your mind and your heart will follow.

don't pre-judge North Dakotans. They're much more tolerant and accepting than one would lead you to believe.

Don't plan on moving here with the thought in mind that everybody is prejudice, that makes you a bigot.

People of color have been living in Minot for more than eighty years. Migrant workers from Mexico have come and worked here for about a hundred years now.

If you want to think people here are prejudiced, then please stay away.

BTW, the first non-native born in North Dakota was black.
to mary

Dickinson, ND

#12 Aug 3, 2006
and what gives karen the right to just assume that?? maybe she should speak for herself instead of for all of us.
Karen

Bismarck, ND

#13 Aug 3, 2006
I'm speaking for MYSELF. I think many people in North Dakota treat Native Americans terribly. There you are "to mary" from Dickinson. This is MY observation, and point of view and no where in my comment did I say that I am speaking for all of North Dakotans. And I will not "engage" with you "to mary" from Dickinson. I have made my point. Bye. PS>>>I am not native american, that will probably be your next question. I'm sor "to mary" from Dickinson, ASSUMING that will be your next question.
Frannie Cryer

United States

#14 Aug 3, 2006
Here is a view point on North Dakota that you will be surprised to hear. My boyfriend and I just arrived home from a 10 day trip to North Dakota. We are from New Jersey and were intrigued about the state. We saw pretty much everything there is to see from Bottineau to Fort Yates all the way over to Fairfield and back to Bismarck. The one thing I can tell you about ND is that the people who live there are lucky to have each other. We have never been so welcomed, treated so kindly, or were so impressed with the community that each town has. Our trip to Beach was one of our favorite stops. La Playa was a yummy resturant and we loved meeting Tama over at the Praire Fire Pottery shop. Good luck to you and your move. Check out our blog on the state, you will see how much of North Dakota there is to love.
http://realtravel.com/united_states-trips-i18...
Frannie
Merrily

Nashville, TN

#15 Aug 3, 2006
Karen wrote:
Merrily, The natives are actually very friendly, but are not treated very well. Most natives live on the reservations scattered around the state, but many have gone on to colleges and own their own businessesand arevery much a reason why ND is the nice state it is. Indians are very passionate about their heritage and they are very welcoming when it comes to Pow wows, arts and craft shows, etc... Te majority of North Dakota residence are white. I'm gueesing, but I'm sure it is around 90 percent white, 9 percent native american, and 1percent mix of all other races. We like to think we are not a racist state, but we have our faults too...especially when it comes to judging our own native amercian neighbors. Most of our states reservations have built casinos with full vegas style gaming. Some people whine that it is North Dakota's downfall, but most people feel it has been a wonderful opportunity for Natives and Non natives to work, play, and share with each other. New Town, ND is a perfect example of how Natives and Non natives work, play and live together.
Karen, from what little I've already read about ND, you're on spot with your race demographics, but poster Mary from Bismark is right; when I asked, "are the natives friendly", I meant as in those people who live therem - have lived there - will always live there - being accepting of those who move there from other places. It wasn't about Native American Indians at all. But the more I read the other postings on this site, the more it seems that, that tiny portion of your populace IS an issue with alot of of you...
Merrily

Nashville, TN

#16 Aug 3, 2006
Ron wrote:
how cold? the southwestern part of the state has the 'balmiest' weather in the winter. The northeastern is by far the coldest. it will be ten above here, and some fifteen below in Grand Forks consistently.
the summers are the best. none better anywhere.
I've seen it 42 below zero. I've seen it 108 degrees in the shade. Floridians who were working here one summer said, "This is hot!"
Good scenery in the northeastern part of the state, Winnipeg is less than a hundred miles. A great city of more than 600,000. Manitoba is friendly.
Thank you Ron. We're actually considering Manitoba as well.
You comments read as though you've called ND "home" all of your long life; even though you may have traveled far. How do you feel about "outsiders"?
And, although this recent heat wave has knocked out records, have you noticed a warming "trend" over the last few years?
Merrily

Nashville, TN

#17 Aug 3, 2006
Mary wrote:
Merrily, Karen is probably right in what she was saying. On the other point about the general population of North Dakotans, most of us are very welcoming and don't pay any attention to people who come and go. However, I would say that if you moved into a very rural area away from a big town, some of the old time farmers would be curious and suspisous as to why anyone would want to move into rural ND, but once their curiosity is fulfilled, you will have a best frined for life. It is not "hillbilly" or "deliverance" mentality, more just curious and why would they want to move here. Even we ND natives laugh when we drive through a little ND town, and the locals know you are not from there, they stop and stare at you as you drive down their little main street wondering who the heck are and why are they driving down our little street in the middle of no where> LOL
You're absolutely right; that's what I meant. Native Americans, as in Indian tribes, never even occured to me.(Although, as I replied to Karen, they do seem to to an ISSUE to everyone there...
food for thought.)

So, rural ND folk may be curious? I can handle that, NOW.
I moved to rural TN from Manhattan, NYC,(where everyone's anonymous), and thought I'd landed on the dark side of the moon!
These people had to know EVERYTHING about me,(and I'll admit, coming from Manhattan, I wasn't exactly ready to disclose my ANYTHING), but even now I don't think it was benign "curiosity"...it was more of a pigeon-holing; keeping a "thumb" on everyone.

As I posted on the "Workers Needed in ND" thread...I wonder if the immigrants,(Mexicans), don't do better here,(and they do!), just because they "are expected to know their place", as opposed to a "Yank".

I just don't want to subject myself to it again, for any reason...
Merrily

Nashville, TN

#18 Aug 3, 2006
Frannie Cryer wrote:
Here is a view point on North Dakota that you will be surprised to hear. My boyfriend and I just arrived home from a 10 day trip to North Dakota. We are from New Jersey and were intrigued about the state. We saw pretty much everything there is to see from Bottineau to Fort Yates all the way over to Fairfield and back to Bismarck. The one thing I can tell you about ND is that the people who live there are lucky to have each other. We have never been so welcomed, treated so kindly, or were so impressed with the community that each town has. Our trip to Beach was one of our favorite stops. La Playa was a yummy resturant and we loved meeting Tama over at the Praire Fire Pottery shop. Good luck to you and your move. Check out our blog on the state, you will see how much of North Dakota there is to love.
http://realtravel.com/united_states-trips-i18...
Frannie
Would you want to LIVE there???
Ron

Williston, ND

#19 Aug 3, 2006
warming trends come and go. Some winters are more mild than others. some summers are cooler than others. I have seen it 55 degrees above zero in January. I've seen it snow on the 29th of May.

I was in Alaska in 2004 in August. It was 94 degrees above at Eagle River. In Minot, it was 55 degrees and raining.

The winters here can be cold and unforgiving. It will be a war of all against all. On a cold day some ten years ago or so, it was -35 degrees here and seventeen above at the North Pole.

Alaska's southeastern coastal weather is warmer in the winter than North Dakota.

Global warming is taking place. However, it is my belief that it is more of a natural phenomenon than a man made consequence. Greenland was farmed by Norwegians from ca. 900 AD to about 1300 AD. They gradually were froze out of their livelyhoods.

I've seen it 98 degrees in October here. 75 degrees in November. One day it will be forty above, the next it will be 2 below.

I believe the early seventies were warmer than they are now. In December of 1980 it was -37 degrees with a wind chill factor of -90 degrees. You don't go driving from Fargo to Bismarck on those days.

One more thing, Oregon has lots of rainy weather. The number of days that people are forced to stay inside out there from inclement weather is about the same number of days the people of North Dakota have to stay inside from the cold.

Like I say, the summers cannot be beat.

The Red River Valley is a sight not soon to be forgotten. Too flat for me though.

When the summers are wet, there will be lots of mosquitos. But not like there is in Alaska. The mosquitos there will eat you alive. Unbelievable, their tenaciousness in unrivaled.

If you ever get a chance to see the Yukon Territory, don't miss it. British Columbia has scenery like no other place on earth. You will never regret the trip.

Grand Prairie, Alberta is another great place to visit. Canada is THE place for vacations.

I love good ole North Dakota, though. It's a great spot on the planet.

The Badlands of the Little Missouri are well worth the visit, too.

hope this helps.

I'll skip some of the downside. It's there, I won't ignore it, but I can forget about it.
Ron

Williston, ND

#20 Aug 3, 2006
Also, there is a family in Noonan that is originally from Massachusetts. They love the place. Too distant and isolated for me.

I have friends who are Native American. One gal is as blonde as a Norwegian. Lief Ericson was around these parts about 1000 AD.

Norwegian mooring stones were discovered in the Turtle Mountains. May not be proof, but it is interesting.

Lots of booze smuggling in Minot during Prohibition of alcohol. Seagram's began its business in Regina, Saskatchewan. The back roads from Minot to Regina were well traveled. Then down to Chicago.

Give Manhattan back to the Manhattan tribe. That'll make New Yorkers cry and whine.

Did you know that Deadwood, South Dakota at one time had opium dens? I've seen them.

Interesting history of Minot:

http://www.minotlibrary.org/minot_history_thr...

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