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Jonah

Austin, TX

#1 May 2, 2009
has anyone ever used this?

I saw it in the store and almost bought it, but I want to get some advice first.

I am terribly afriad of snakes, and we live by a stream and sometimes they come crawling by.
We have pets & children here who run around and play in the yard and we get worried.

any advice on this product and how to use it?
louisiana_woman

Abilene, TX

#2 May 2, 2009
i was told it does work but i have not try it yet
Snake Hater too

Ballwin, MO

#3 May 2, 2009
If you really want to know if it works you can check out does it work wednesday on KFVS12.com they had it on there and it didn't work against the snakes they crawled through it. I live out in the country and we use moth balls in our pump house, shop, and under the house to keep them away because they don't like them. I didn't believe it until I seen it for myself. We got one in our pump house and we throw them in it and that snake tried to get away from them. So I'm a proud user of moth balls everywhere.
Jonah

Austin, TX

#4 May 2, 2009
Knowledge about snakes will help you understand how to handle situations when snakes are encountered. Buy and use a good field guide to reptiles to help identify snakes and understand their habits.

In most cases, the snakes around houses are harmless types such as garter, ribbon, ringneck, king, or rat snakes. However, Mississippi does have four genera that include different species of venomous snakes: copperhead, cottonmouth or water moccasin, coral snake, canebrake or timber rattlesnake, pygmy rattlesnake, and eastern diamondback rattlesnake.

If you live in an area with poisonous snakes, consult Extension Information Sheet 641 Snakes Alive! How To Identify Snakes to learn more about their characteristics.

Poisonous Snakes
Copperhead. The copperhead has pit viper characteristics and bands or hourglass markings of brown, copper, or red on a tan body. These 20- to 36-inch snakes (the record is 56 inches) have regional differences in color and size; the young have a bright-yellow tail tip. As with many (but not all) poisonous snakes, its head has a flat, triangular shape and its pupils are vertical.

Cottonmouth. The semiaquatic western cottonmouth, or water moccasin, also has pit viper characteristics. The adult has a banded or blotched upper body that is olive brown or black colored, with a lighter underside. Although often difficult to distinguish from the nonpoisonous water snake, a cottonmouth often appears more aggressive. Whereas water snakes may or may not leave quickly when threatened, this pit viper often raises its head and appears more aggressive by confronting an enemy with a show of fangs inside a cotton-white mouth. The size of the cottonmouth ranges from 30 to 48 inches, with a record length of 74 inches.

Coral Snake. The coral snake is an exception to the other venomous snakes of the United States, because it has round pupils and an oval head. Nevertheless, it is quite venomous. Whereas the pit viper venom reduces the amount of oxygen carried by a victimís red blood cells, the coral snake has neurotoxic venom that rapidly affects the nervous system. Because of its small mouth, the coral snake has trouble grasping and biting a much-larger human; however, if it does manage to bite, the effect from a coral snake can be more deadly than from a pit viper.

Rattlesnake. Many varieties of rattlesnakes have pit viper characteristics and a button on the tail (youngest snakes), plus two to four segments of rattles for each year of age. The size range of rattlesnakes is 15 to 72 inches, with a 96-inch eastern diamondback holding the record.

Controlling Snake Problems
Habitat Management
The most effective way to discourage snakes around a home, such as in the yard or garden, is to make the area unattractive to them. Remove their habitat, including hiding places, foraging areas, and food resources.

In early spring, snakes are attracted to hot spots, such as metal cans or other heat-conducting items. Snakes are most active during warm months, when they are attracted to cool, damp, sheltered areas. Remove hiding cover for snakes near homes, including piles of boards or firewood, rock or brick piles, and weedy growth. Check around cement walks or porches for cracks or holes that might provide access to snakes for shelter. Repair or close these access points to prevent their use.

If you have firewood stored for a fireplace or woodstove, keep the stack away from the house. Wood can be temporarily stored near the house during cold months when snakes are inactive. Use a rack to keep the firewood at least 12 inches above the ground; snakes will be discouraged if the wood (shelter) is separated from the soil. Snakes like to lay eggs in compost piles, so keep those away from the house. Keep fencerows and the edges of wooded areas free of debris, brush, and other cover.
Jonah

Austin, TX

#5 May 2, 2009
Snake Hater too wrote:
If you really want to know if it works you can check out does it work wednesday on KFVS12.com they had it on there and it didn't work against the snakes they crawled through it. I live out in the country and we use moth balls in our pump house, shop, and under the house to keep them away because they don't like them. I didn't believe it until I seen it for myself. We got one in our pump house and we throw them in it and that snake tried to get away from them. So I'm a proud user of moth balls everywhere.
the summer we used moth balls we have 5 snakes in the yard :(
Jonah

Austin, TX

#6 May 2, 2009
anyone know about :garlic, epsom salt, sulfer, and someone said snakes can't crawl over ropes???

LOL @ this guy :
"I used to have many snakes. I used a concrete cinder block. Simply run up to the snake and toss the block on it. That will take care of your problem, it worked great for me"
StarBreaker

Plainview, TX

#7 May 3, 2009
Any products claiming to be a skin irritant is going to be quite ineffective against snakes for 1 main reason. They have scales covering their skin making it highly unlikely said irritant will come into contact with their skin.

Not to mention you should be able to judge said agent's caustic or acidic nature by what it does to your yard. If it doesn't kill your grass, it's not very irritating...

Like spiders, snakes are virtually immune to most residual type poisons and deterrents and usually have to be dealt with directly. I say virtually because they are not immune. A rat trap will kill a snake, but not because the snake was "hunting" cheese. Likewise, spiders do not clean themselves like insects and thus will not ingest poison simply because they walked through it.

“Resident car/gun nut”

Since: Dec 08

Amarillo, TX

#8 May 3, 2009
A Walther P-22 loaded with CCI Stingers always solved my snake problem.

I did cap one with a 50 AE Desert Eagle one time, that was messy.
opinion

Stillwater, OK

#9 May 3, 2009
Jonah wrote:
has anyone ever used this?
I saw it in the store and almost bought it, but I want to get some advice first.
I am terribly afriad of snakes, and we live by a stream and sometimes they come crawling by.
We have pets & children here who run around and play in the yard and we get worried.
any advice on this product and how to use it?
Yes I've used it and it does seem to work.
supposedly not harmful to pets. The clove oil and other 2 other herbs along with sulfur deter the snake does not kill it.
bagger

Atlanta, GA

#10 May 3, 2009
you can't be a 12ga loaded with 3 7.5 shot.
Not A Snake Lover

United States

#11 May 3, 2009
Mothballs seem to help ward them off.
Also, sprinkle cinnamon around the house.
Plant basil and onions near, or any plants
with pungent odors.
what happen

Rayville, LA

#12 May 3, 2009
Jonah wrote:
has anyone ever used this?
I saw it in the store and almost bought it, but I want to get some advice first.
I am terribly afriad of snakes, and we live by a stream and sometimes they come crawling by.
We have pets & children here who run around and play in the yard and we get worried.
any advice on this product and how to use it?
Yes, it does work. Just some advice, I seem on TV the other day about it. If you put it out, if one or more snakes are already in your yard they will stay. Think about it! You put it out to keep them from coming in your yard but if they are already in there they will not leave.
I really never thought about it that way till I seem it on TV.
Doctor Phil Snake eyes

Rayville, LA

#13 May 3, 2009
Sulphur mixed with siven dust and crushed moth balls work. Mix a bunch of it in a 5 gallon bucket and spread it around the borders of your yard.

Since: Apr 09

Natchitoches, LA

#14 May 4, 2009
I had a snake in my house in late February. I had had some mice and assumed he was coming in to get a snack. I was not happy... I did buy alot of moth balls and haven't seen him since, but not really sure if the moth balls did the trick or the fact that I haven't had that many more mice (I live in the middle of a big field). As far as I'm concerned, they are all poisonous. I know many people told me they will control my mouse population, but guess what---I don't care. I want those scaly bastards out of my house! Ick.
Oober Goober

Raleigh, NC

#15 May 4, 2009
Jonah wrote:
Knowledge about snakes will help you understand how to handle situations when snakes are encountered. Buy and use a good field guide to reptiles to help identify snakes and understand their habits.
In most cases, the snakes around houses are harmless types such as garter, ribbon, ringneck, king, or rat snakes. However, Mississippi does have four genera that include different species of venomous snakes: copperhead, cottonmouth or water moccasin, coral snake, canebrake or timber rattlesnake, pygmy rattlesnake, and eastern diamondback rattlesnake.
If you live in an area with poisonous snakes, consult Extension Information Sheet 641 Snakes Alive! How To Identify Snakes to learn more about their characteristics.
Poisonous Snakes
Copperhead. The copperhead has pit viper characteristics and bands or hourglass markings of brown, copper, or red on a tan body. These 20- to 36-inch snakes (the record is 56 inches) have regional differences in color and size; the young have a bright-yellow tail tip. As with many (but not all) poisonous snakes, its head has a flat, triangular shape and its pupils are vertical.
Cottonmouth. The semiaquatic western cottonmouth, or water moccasin, also has pit viper characteristics. The adult has a banded or blotched upper body that is olive brown or black colored, with a lighter underside. Although often difficult to distinguish from the nonpoisonous water snake, a cottonmouth often appears more aggressive. Whereas water snakes may or may not leave quickly when threatened, this pit viper often raises its head and appears more aggressive by confronting an enemy with a show of fangs inside a cotton-white mouth. The size of the cottonmouth ranges from 30 to 48 inches, with a record length of 74 inches.
Coral Snake. The coral snake is an exception to the other venomous snakes of the United States, because it has round pupils and an oval head. Nevertheless, it is quite venomous. Whereas the pit viper venom reduces the amount of oxygen carried by a victimís red blood cells, the coral snake has neurotoxic venom that rapidly affects the nervous system. Because of its small mouth, the coral snake has trouble grasping and biting a much-larger human; however, if it does manage to bite, the effect from a coral snake can be more deadly than from a pit viper.
Rattlesnake. Many varieties of rattlesnakes have pit viper characteristics and a button on the tail (youngest snakes), plus two to four segments of rattles for each year of age. The size range of rattlesnakes is 15 to 72 inches, with a 96-inch eastern diamondback holding the record.
Controlling Snake Problems
Habitat Management
The most effective way to discourage snakes around a home, such as in the yard or garden, is to make the area unattractive to them. Remove their habitat, including hiding places, foraging areas, and food resources.
In early spring, snakes are attracted to hot spots, such as metal cans or other heat-conducting items. Snakes are most active during warm months, when they are attracted to cool, damp, sheltered areas. Remove hiding cover for snakes near homes, including piles of boards or firewood, rock or brick piles, and weedy growth. Check around cement walks or porches for cracks or holes that might provide access to snakes for shelter. Repair or close these access points to prevent their use.
If you have firewood stored for a fireplace or woodstove, keep the stack away from the house. Wood can be temporarily stored near the house during cold months when snakes are inactive. Use a rack to keep the firewood at least 12 inches above the ground; snakes will be discouraged if the wood (shelter) is separated from the soil. Snakes like to lay eggs in compost piles, so keep those away from the house. Keep fencerows and the edges of wooded areas free of debris, brush, and other cover.
The hell with all that reading. Get a nice sharp hoe. That will take care of a snake, Real fun too.!
Farmer

Plainview, TX

#16 May 4, 2009
I use a 12 guage with number 8 shot. It doesn't prevent them from coming into my yard, but it does prevent them from coming back.
saywut

Abilene, TX

#17 May 4, 2009
Jonah wrote:
In most cases, the snakes around houses are harmless types such as garter, ribbon, ringneck, king, or rat snakes. However, Mississippi does have four genera that include different species of venomous snakes: copperhead, cottonmouth or water moccasin, coral snake, canebrake or timber rattlesnake, pygmy rattlesnake, and eastern diamondback rattlesnake.
Yes, yes. I've heard the "good snake" explanations all my life. Snakes with hearts of gold, no doubt. But I do species identification after I shoot, and I've always-always been careful to apologize when I accidentally shot a good one. Sorry, but I'd rather be wrong about him, before he's wrong about me.
snake boy

Natchitoches, LA

#18 May 4, 2009
Mothballs
Bsss

Plainview, TX

#19 May 4, 2009
Mothballs = old wive's tale.
WHAT

Shreveport, LA

#20 May 4, 2009
Jonah wrote:
has anyone ever used this?
I saw it in the store and almost bought it, but I want to get some advice first.
I am terribly afriad of snakes, and we live by a stream and sometimes they come crawling by.
We have pets & children here who run around and play in the yard and we get worried.
any advice on this product and how to use it?
SULPHUR works better. Snake away has moth balls and sand in it with sulphur. But I had sulphur in my hand and it spilled out on my booth and there was a snake about to strike me and he made a mad dash for the woods when the sulphur spilled on him. But you must reapply after a rain. And with all this rain its hard. Sulphur isn't cheap but it works the best. You can get it at any Farm & Feed store.

Good Luck!

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