Albion prison's ex-boss collects $62,...

Albion prison's ex-boss collects $62,800 pension

There are 47 comments on the GoErie.com story from Mar 29, 2008, titled Albion prison's ex-boss collects $62,800 pension. In it, GoErie.com reports that:

A former state prison superintendent who retired after a prisoner escape is collecting an annual state pension of $62,800. Marilyn Stewart Brooks was removed as superintendent of the State Correctional ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at GoErie.com.

First Prev
of 3
Next Last
Albion

United States

#1 Mar 29, 2008
Way to go Marilyn-the ultimate con to taxpayer's of this state!
Rider

Lorain, OH

#2 Mar 30, 2008
Well deserved.
Old-timer

Decatur, GA

#3 Mar 31, 2008
What a ripoff! This woman should have been fired and not allowed to retire. She is a disgrace to he race.
Roger

Gibsonia, PA

#4 Mar 31, 2008
THE WORSE YOU ARE THE MORE YOU CAN RIP OFF PEOPLE, VERY TYPICAL OF STATE AND FEDERAL JOBS.
elkcreek

Edinboro, PA

#5 Mar 31, 2008
This whole mess should be investigated by the State Senate as well as the House of Reps. It is time to draw the line in the sand - what are we paying the legislature for? Launch an investigation and if nothing else deny her pension - to be paid like that is a bunch of crap.

“concern citizen”

Since: Mar 08

orlando

#6 Mar 31, 2008
I agree with you elkcreek!!!

“Love Freedom, Thank a Soldier”

Since: Feb 08

Erie,PA

#7 Mar 31, 2008
Did they ever capture the escapee?
Bigpapa

Erie, PA

#8 Mar 31, 2008
Sounds like she needs to be in prison instead of running them.
Amazed

AOL

#10 Apr 1, 2008
" I got mine, you get yours."
Albion

Colver, PA

#11 Apr 9, 2008
Marilyn,
Now that the escapee was caught-why don't you reapply for your old job !!!
Waiting

United States

#12 Apr 9, 2008
khp33 wrote:
Did they ever capture the escapee?
YEs, Mr. Malcolm Kysor was captured in California recently. Police were tipped off by concerned citizens after he 'bragged' about being on America's Most Wanted.
After Thought

Ashtabula, OH

#13 Apr 9, 2008
There is not enough room to explain what I have actually seen. There is much , much more going on than people would want to accept even if they saw it (denial). Their is a certain type of personality (ignorance/barberic) that justs accepts what happens and looks the other way for whatever the reason. I did what I could in the short period of time that I had, but I couldn't take anymore and had to get out for my own survival; I have now (2yrs.) regained enough inner strength to get back into all the crazy to try and help. A person would understand only if they experienced it.
swc

Lorain, OH

#14 Apr 9, 2008
After Thought wrote:
There is not enough room to explain what I have actually seen. There is much , much more going on than people would want to accept even if they saw it (denial). Their is a certain type of personality (ignorance/barberic) that justs accepts what happens and looks the other way for whatever the reason. I did what I could in the short period of time that I had, but I couldn't take anymore and had to get out for my own survival; I have now (2yrs.) regained enough inner strength to get back into all the crazy to try and help. A person would understand only if they experienced it.
What???????
After Thought

Ashtabula, OH

#15 Apr 9, 2008
swc wrote:
<quoted text>What???????
Like I said, you have to see it and experience it to understand. Corruption, cynical nature, abusive behavior, bashing, fighting over meaningless trivia, senseless murder, greed...you name it. It all exists in the system and because intitutions are more confined it is more noticible. Not everyone, but a good percentage, become effected both inmate and caregiver. If a person stays in it long enough and you don't guard yourself from it a person sometimes becomes the person they dislike the most; real life. Sorry, the best I can do for now.
Biker

Lorain, OH

#16 Apr 9, 2008
After Thought wrote:
<quoted text>
Like I said, you have to see it and experience it to understand. Corruption, cynical nature, abusive behavior, bashing, fighting over meaningless trivia, senseless murder, greed...you name it. It all exists in the system and because intitutions are more confined it is more noticible. Not everyone, but a good percentage, become effected both inmate and caregiver. If a person stays in it long enough and you don't guard yourself from it a person sometimes becomes the person they dislike the most; real life. Sorry, the best I can do for now.
Have another drink; it's good for you.
After Thought

Ashtabula, OH

#18 Apr 10, 2008
Biker wrote:
<quoted text>Have another drink; it's good for you.
Sorry, I thought the age of reason is 30 yrs.; you just proved that statistic wrong.
swc

Lorain, OH

#19 Apr 10, 2008
After Thought wrote:
<quoted text>
Like I said, you have to see it and experience it to understand. Corruption, cynical nature, abusive behavior, bashing, fighting over meaningless trivia, senseless murder, greed...you name it. It all exists in the system and because intitutions are more confined it is more noticible. Not everyone, but a good percentage, become effected both inmate and caregiver. If a person stays in it long enough and you don't guard yourself from it a person sometimes becomes the person they dislike the most; real life. Sorry, the best I can do for now.
experience what?????? You are not making any sense..sorry...
After Thought

Ashtabula, OH

#20 Apr 10, 2008
swc wrote:
<quoted text>experience what?????? You are not making any sense..sorry...
I worked for the state for 2 1/2 yrs. in an institution for convicted felons. Sometimes a person reads what is happening in the news paper or hears what is happening on the news, shakes their heads and doesn't give it any thought. Then when you actually experience it, the effects truly become reality and your perspective changes 100%; you know they are true but hard to believe until you actually see it. I became very, very sensitive with other peoples feelings and not just mine or my families. I would never intentionaly go into another person's space unless forced to prior to this, I wouldn't bother people. I finaly opened my eyes and said to myself, "What can I do to help make a difference." People can't change other people they can only change themself. You can help guide them but you can't make them; "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink." I saw certain people actually try to physically beat some sense into inmates but this only made the person worse with anger and hostility; instead of showing them by actions what normal is. Most inmates come from very abusive environments and think this is the norm, it isn't; it was only for the inmate. The certain inmate and other types come to believe that compassion is a weakness, it's not it's a strength; sometimes people take things for granted. If society wonders why there is so much repeat offenders, all they need to do is work in this type of environment for 6-8 mths. and keep their eye's and mind wide open, they will soon have their answers.
swc

Lorain, OH

#21 Apr 10, 2008
After Thought wrote:
<quoted text>
I worked for the state for 2 1/2 yrs. in an institution for convicted felons. Sometimes a person reads what is happening in the news paper or hears what is happening on the news, shakes their heads and doesn't give it any thought. Then when you actually experience it, the effects truly become reality and your perspective changes 100%; you know they are true but hard to believe until you actually see it. I became very, very sensitive with other peoples feelings and not just mine or my families. I would never intentionaly go into another person's space unless forced to prior to this, I wouldn't bother people. I finaly opened my eyes and said to myself, "What can I do to help make a difference." People can't change other people they can only change themself. You can help guide them but you can't make them; "You can lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink." I saw certain people actually try to physically beat some sense into inmates but this only made the person worse with anger and hostility; instead of showing them by actions what normal is. Most inmates come from very abusive environments and think this is the norm, it isn't; it was only for the inmate. The certain inmate and other types come to believe that compassion is a weakness, it's not it's a strength; sometimes people take things for granted. If society wonders why there is so much repeat offenders, all they need to do is work in this type of environment for 6-8 mths. and keep their eye's and mind wide open, they will soon have their answers.
2 an half years..thats nothing...but glad that it inspired you....that is wha matters..right????
swc

Lorain, OH

#22 Apr 10, 2008
oops what not wha sorry

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 3
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Muncy Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Election Who do you support for U.S. House in Pennsylvan... (Oct '10) Mar '16 Drums leprechaun 54
News Theater Marquee Drums Up Controversy in Muncy Jan '16 Richard Allen 1
tresspasser (Jun '14) Nov '15 Missing her 8
What happened to the Barto thread? (May '10) Nov '15 Kcp 373
Election Who do you support for U.S. House in Pennsylvan... (Oct '10) Aug '15 Archie Bunker 8
Mary Griggs of Mountoursville (Apr '15) Jul '15 Allan 2
News Bill seeks to limit pension burdens (Jun '15) Jun '15 silly rabbit 1
More from around the web

Personal Finance

Muncy Mortgages