The buzz beyond the vroom in Indianapolis

What's astonishing isn't what Indianapolis has become. We've finally grown accustomed to the resurgence. Full Story
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Chris Brown

San Ramon, CA

#22 Aug 22, 2007
Jennifer Long wrote:
Sorry Indy... no matter how much you try you'll never be more than a pit stop.
It's hardly a metropolitan city or even a burgeoning metropolitan city, it's a full on sports-centric city. Which wouldn't necessarily be a bad things thing except the citizens of Indianapolis can't be bothered to leave the comfort of their tricked-out Barcoloungers (complete with side cooler storage and handy-dandy multiple remote caddies) to attend a game. Indianapolis tried the "If you build it they will come," approach and it didn't work.
The people of Indianapolis do two things well: sit in front of the TV and shop at Wal-Mart, or Keystone at the Crossing.
YAWN...
Alan Solomon WISHES that people were dining at Dunaways. St. Elmo's is so over-rated and not at all what it used to be, a long time ago, before we were all born. Nicky Blaine's is the one cool spot in a desert. Rathskellar, same. Mass Ave. appeals to so few. And Broadripple to too many, unfortunately, most of them backward hat wearing types and the bimbo's who love them.
It would be nice if someone read this article and then actually bought tickets to a show at Phoenix or came to see a jazz concert at the zoo. But they won't. It would mean actually leaving the comfy confines of the 'burbs.
In reality, Indianapolis is all about Applebee's and Chuck E. Cheese. If that is your idea of (manufactured) entertainment and good food then Indianapolis is your town. Load up on your snack foods and beer, park yer butt in front of the big screen and have at it.
OK... my final comment on how backward Indianapolis is. Their hope on revitalizing the state budget relies on lottery sales.
Cue the banjo's.
Sorry, Jennifer Long, the banjo music must be playing for your own inbred family!

The city of Indianapolis has about 800,000 people and its metropolitan area 2 million, which though certainly smaller than Chicago, makes Indianapolis far more than a "pit stop" under anyone's definition.

Obviously, you got dumped or something by your boyfriend/girlfriend in Indianapolis and this sad experience has engender all your nasty feelings toward the city; however, your ridiculous comments are so far off base that they are truly humorous.

Your comments about Wal-Mart and Applebee's and other chains are especially funny since, last time I checked, you can find those same chain restaurants and stores in Chicago and just about any other major city--even San Francisco, one of the most anti-chain store cities in the country, has its fair share of chains (from Starbucks to Best Buy).

Indianapolis has several beautiful neighborhoods filled with lovely and well-maintained homes, a host of cultural amenities--including one of the top ten art museums in the country, numerous "non-chain" and critically praised restaurants, several theatres and arts organizations, and many unique bars and clubs to complement its interesting nightlife. It also is the most affordable major metropolitan area in the nation. In short, Indianapolis is a great city and beats out a lot of its peer cities and even some larger cities in many categories.

Jen, no one is saying you have to live Indianapolis or even like it, but your hysterical lies and silly insults about the city just make you look foolish and prevent anyone from taking you seriously.

I would suggest you avoid future news commentary and instead keep practicing your banjo.
Detroit Red Wings

United States

#23 Aug 22, 2007
Jennifer Long wrote:
Sorry Indy... no matter how much you try you'll never be more than a pit stop.
It's hardly a metropolitan city or even a burgeoning metropolitan city, it's a full on sports-centric city. Which wouldn't necessarily be a bad things thing except the citizens of Indianapolis can't be bothered to leave the comfort of their tricked-out Barcoloungers (complete with side cooler storage and handy-dandy multiple remote caddies) to attend a game. Indianapolis tried the "If you build it they will come," approach and it didn't work.
The people of Indianapolis do two things well: sit in front of the TV and shop at Wal-Mart, or Keystone at the Crossing.
YAWN...
Alan Solomon WISHES that people were dining at Dunaways. St. Elmo's is so over-rated and not at all what it used to be, a long time ago, before we were all born. Nicky Blaine's is the one cool spot in a desert. Rathskellar, same. Mass Ave. appeals to so few. And Broadripple to too many, unfortunately, most of them backward hat wearing types and the bimbo's who love them.
It would be nice if someone read this article and then actually bought tickets to a show at Phoenix or came to see a jazz concert at the zoo. But they won't. It would mean actually leaving the comfy confines of the 'burbs.
In reality, Indianapolis is all about Applebee's and Chuck E. Cheese. If that is your idea of (manufactured) entertainment and good food then Indianapolis is your town. Load up on your snack foods and beer, park yer butt in front of the big screen and have at it.
OK... my final comment on how backward Indianapolis is. Their hope on revitalizing the state budget relies on lottery sales.
Cue the banjo's.
Do a little research and explore the city before you write somethign as ridiculous as that.

I guess you're right though. I forgot that Chicago doesn't have any chains or suburbs. I mean, it's incredible that they don't have McDonald's anywhere, or that none of the stores on Michigan Avenue are chains (can you imagine what a shame that would be?)

Good thing everyone in Chicagoland lives in the city are all so sophisticated an metropolitan that Applebees & Chuck-E-Cheese don't even think about opening up franchises there.

Seriously, your comments could be about any major city in the US with suburbs, from New York to Seattle.

It's one thing to be critical of suburbs, chains, corporate America, etc, but it's completely idiotic to act like they are problems that only plague Indy.

I strongly suggest you explore the city more thoroughly and you will be thorougly surprised.
Danimal

Herculaneum, MO

#24 Aug 22, 2007
Cory wrote:
Jennifer's comment was not surprising to me at all. Typical Chicago attitude towards just about any other city in the midwest. This article could have been about Cincinnati, Columbus, or even Louisville.
i don't know if i'd call it a typical chicago attitude. jennifer's little rant sounds like the whinings of someone who grew up in or around indy, and for whatever reason thought she had an awful childhood. then at some point in her early adulthood, she decided to move to a bigger city like chicago, and to help her justify this move to herself, she has to talk up her new adopted home as the greatest place ever, while at the same time condemning her former home as the most horrible godforsaken place imaginable. unfortunately, this is not an uncommon attitude found amongst the smaller-minded members of our species. i've witnessed the same phenomenon from former chicagoans who have "moved up" to NYC.

the truth is that indy is great city for what it is. no, it's not chicago or new york or san francisco or whatever, but that's ok because it's not supposed to be. i had my eyes opened to indy this past may when my family decided to do a little reunion getaway weekend in indy. we stayed downtown and had great time. i was thoroughly impressed with the liveliness and vibrancy of downtown. i was impressed with the many meticulously restored and cared for historic commercial structures. i was most impressed with monument circle, which just may be one of the finest urban spaces in the entire midwest, if not the nation. i was impressed with the development along the canal on the edge of downtown, what a cool urban space to jog or stroll or just plain hangout and enjoy a summer day. i was impressed with the great selection of restaurants right in the heart of downtown. all in all, i was impressed with pretty much everything indy has done to redefine its city center.

it's unfortunate, but some people do travel to other places merely to complain about what they don't have. i just can't be that negative. i travel to new and different places to see and experience what they do have, to enjoy what they offer, to take the places on their own terms, not to hold them up to some preconceived template and then judge them on whether or not they live up to some standard. and from my travels around the midwest i can say that our region is blessed with a fine collection cities. sure, the rust belt economic blues have taken their toll on some more than others, but from the twin cities to cincinnati and from cleveland to st. louis and everything in between, the midwest has some really fine urban gems, and that's the attitude of a real chicagoan.

Since: Dec 06

Indianapolis

#25 Aug 22, 2007
Danimal-

You are correct. I shouldn't have made a sweeping generalization about all of the fine folks in Chicago based off of one venemous post.
Snoop Doggie Dog

Palo Alto, CA

#26 Aug 22, 2007
For a city with a metro population of about 1.6 million I give Indy the thumbs up.
Johnathon

Chicago, IL

#27 Aug 22, 2007
I'm a recent tranplant from Philly to Chicago. Indy is all right but it is not an urban city, actually nothing in the midwest is outside of Chicago. I love Chicago but its location is horrible.
pittcon

United States

#28 Aug 27, 2007
Johnathon wrote:
I'm a recent tranplant from Philly to Chicago. Indy is all right but it is not an urban city, actually nothing in the midwest is outside of Chicago. I love Chicago but its location is horrible.
Check out, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Cleveland, Detroit. All very urban.
Preacher to Idiots

Louisville, KY

#29 Jan 14, 2008
Johnathon wrote:
I'm a recent tranplant from Philly to Chicago. Indy is all right but it is not an urban city, actually nothing in the midwest is outside of Chicago. I love Chicago but its location is horrible.


I love the Bos-Wash urban corridor! But it's not urban--it's surrounded by empty ocean and woods and farmland; its location is awful, just in the middle of no place! Also like Tokyo, on an island. And Mumbai ...
JTK

Schaumburg, IL

#30 Jan 15, 2008
I'm an IU grad and had more than one occassion to visit Indy. I agree with the other posters who said that the town (I also hesitate to call it a full-blown city; more like a very large suburb) is fine for what it is. I'd also agree that many of the venues named by Mr. Solomon are passable at best. While I do like Indy, what irked me was how land-locked the place really is. There are certain places where sometimes you just need to see a body of water on occassion and Indy is one of those. In other words, in my view, Chicago is fairly blessed by geography.
SmartyPants

Demotte, IN

#31 Jun 23, 2008
I live exactly 1/2 way between Chicago and Indy, actually when the Bears played the Colts they determined the exact middle to be one exit south off I65 from the one I live near.

I love Chicago like no other city...in my book nothing compares to it. However, when our children were little, we started spending long weekends in Indy. The children's museum is top notch, and with a fraction of the people at a Chicago museums, it made for a more pleasant experience.

On one visit, I woke up early and went out to find bagels while the rest of my family slept. I asked a gentleman on the street where a bagel shop was, and he said to follow him as he was headed to Einstein Brother's bagels himself. He was so friendly as we chatted on the way to the shop. I ordered 5 bagels and got up to the cashier to pay, and she said that the man had given her money to pay for my bagels.

Now that, my friends, is midwestern charm at it's finest. I've been an Indy fan ever since.
sgr14225

East Amherst, NY

#32 Apr 22, 2012
Well, all I can say is, I was there twice a few years ago for band trips and the only thing there was a lame mall and a speedway, or whatever, I'm not into racing. I'm not into sports either, so there goes the only other thing Indianapolis is known for. No restaurants within walking distance, but that was poor location. It just didn't seem like a walkable city, you know, that section of town that's really hopping and has a lot of restaurants and bars within walking distance... and it's safe to walk at night. Anyhow, the band is going there again, and I think I may skip the trip this year.
sgr14225

East Amherst, NY

#33 Apr 22, 2012
Just realized my previous post will show I'm from Buffalo NY and realized people can call me a hypocrite. Buffalo is no major city either, they could have done a lot more and could do more with the waterfront. Point is, I don't think Buffalo is better, that's why I live in the suburbs.

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