The buzz beyond the vroom in Indianap...

The buzz beyond the vroom in Indianapolis

There are 32 comments on the Chicago Tribune story from Aug 3, 2007, titled The buzz beyond the vroom in Indianapolis. In it, Chicago Tribune reports that:

What's astonishing isn't what Indianapolis has become. We've finally grown accustomed to the resurgence.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Chicago Tribune.

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Sandra J

Noblesville, IN

#1 Aug 6, 2007
It's about time Indianapolis is getting some attention! There are lots of fun things to do downtown and the surronding areas, especially the Wholesale District, where I happen to live and work.:)
Del

Marysville, OH

#2 Aug 6, 2007
INDY ROCKS!!! PLEASE COME VISIT!
Jennifer Long

Chicago, IL

#3 Aug 6, 2007
Sorry Indy... no matter how much you try you'll never be more than a pit stop.
It's hardly a metropolitan city or even a burgeoning metropolitan city, it's a full on sports-centric city. Which wouldn't necessarily be a bad things thing except the citizens of Indianapolis can't be bothered to leave the comfort of their tricked-out Barcoloungers (complete with side cooler storage and handy-dandy multiple remote caddies) to attend a game. Indianapolis tried the "If you build it they will come," approach and it didn't work.
The people of Indianapolis do two things well: sit in front of the TV and shop at Wal-Mart, or Keystone at the Crossing.
YAWN...
Alan Solomon WISHES that people were dining at Dunaways. St. Elmo's is so over-rated and not at all what it used to be, a long time ago, before we were all born. Nicky Blaine's is the one cool spot in a desert. Rathskellar, same. Mass Ave. appeals to so few. And Broadripple to too many, unfortunately, most of them backward hat wearing types and the bimbo's who love them.
It would be nice if someone read this article and then actually bought tickets to a show at Phoenix or came to see a jazz concert at the zoo. But they won't. It would mean actually leaving the comfy confines of the 'burbs.
In reality, Indianapolis is all about Applebee's and Chuck E. Cheese. If that is your idea of (manufactured) entertainment and good food then Indianapolis is your town. Load up on your snack foods and beer, park yer butt in front of the big screen and have at it.
OK... my final comment on how backward Indianapolis is. Their hope on revitalizing the state budget relies on lottery sales.
Cue the banjo's.
Shirley

Chicago, IL

#4 Aug 6, 2007
I was SHOCKED when I went to Indy for the first time ever for the F1 race this June. Albeit, it was livelier than normal, but sitting in a cafe in front of the fabulous memorial fountain which is surrounded by a circular cobblestone roundabout of sorts, honestly, it could have been Europe. (I go there regularly...) And I am not easily impressed....
cheryl harding - indpls

Warren, NJ

#5 Aug 7, 2007
Jennifer Long wrote:
Sorry Indy... no matter how much you try you'll never be more than a pit stop.
It's hardly a metropolitan city or even a burgeoning metropolitan city, it's a full on sports-centric city. Which wouldn't necessarily be a bad things thing except the citizens of Indianapolis can't be bothered to leave the comfort of their tricked-out Barcoloungers (complete with side cooler storage and handy-dandy multiple remote caddies) to attend a game. Indianapolis tried the "If you build it they will come," approach and it didn't work.
The people of Indianapolis do two things well: sit in front of the TV and shop at Wal-Mart, or Keystone at the Crossing.
YAWN...
Alan Solomon WISHES that people were dining at Dunaways. St. Elmo's is so over-rated and not at all what it used to be, a long time ago, before we were all born. Nicky Blaine's is the one cool spot in a desert. Rathskellar, same. Mass Ave. appeals to so few. And Broadripple to too many, unfortunately, most of them backward hat wearing types and the bimbo's who love them.
It would be nice if someone read this article and then actually bought tickets to a show at Phoenix or came to see a jazz concert at the zoo. But they won't. It would mean actually leaving the comfy confines of the 'burbs.
In reality, Indianapolis is all about Applebee's and Chuck E. Cheese. If that is your idea of (manufactured) entertainment and good food then Indianapolis is your town. Load up on your snack foods and beer, park yer butt in front of the big screen and have at it.
OK... my final comment on how backward Indianapolis is. Their hope on revitalizing the state budget relies on lottery sales.
Cue the banjo's.
all i can say jennifer is thanks for going back to chicago! i bet you are really fun date!!! complain complain complain. you probably are just missing your "old style" beer and it is making you crabby.
Doug

Northbrook, IL

#6 Aug 7, 2007
And please don't forget one of the country's finest children's museums with a multi-story Chilhooly, a dinosaur exclusive to the museum and much, much more than just drinking and dining in Indie...
Dave

New York, NY

#7 Aug 8, 2007
Jennifer Long wrote:
Sorry Indy... no matter how much you try you'll never be more than a pit stop.
It's hardly a metropolitan city or even a burgeoning metropolitan city, it's a full on sports-centric city. Which wouldn't necessarily be a bad things thing except the citizens of Indianapolis can't be bothered to leave the comfort of their tricked-out Barcoloungers (complete with side cooler storage and handy-dandy multiple remote caddies) to attend a game. Indianapolis tried the "If you build it they will come," approach and it didn't work.
The people of Indianapolis do two things well: sit in front of the TV and shop at Wal-Mart, or Keystone at the Crossing.
YAWN...
Alan Solomon WISHES that people were dining at Dunaways. St. Elmo's is so over-rated and not at all what it used to be, a long time ago, before we were all born. Nicky Blaine's is the one cool spot in a desert. Rathskellar, same. Mass Ave. appeals to so few. And Broadripple to too many, unfortunately, most of them backward hat wearing types and the bimbo's who love them.
It would be nice if someone read this article and then actually bought tickets to a show at Phoenix or came to see a jazz concert at the zoo. But they won't. It would mean actually leaving the comfy confines of the 'burbs.
In reality, Indianapolis is all about Applebee's and Chuck E. Cheese. If that is your idea of (manufactured) entertainment and good food then Indianapolis is your town. Load up on your snack foods and beer, park yer butt in front of the big screen and have at it.
OK... my final comment on how backward Indianapolis is. Their hope on revitalizing the state budget relies on lottery sales.
Cue the banjo's.
It is truly a shame that the only means you have, Jennifer, to characterize a city and its population is through the cheap use of stereotype. I guess that shows just how uneducated and closed- minded you are. I praise my home city at every opportunity and cite not only the dining, nightlife and cultural aspects associated with Indianapolis, but also the fair housing costs, great schools and solid MidWestern values system inherent in its people. I live in Chicago, and there are many things about this city and area that repulse me. But I refrain from demonizing the entire Chicagoland area through the use of stereotype, preferring to keep my obsevations to myself while lauding all of the great opportunities we have here. I would like to speak to your point about how the Indiana budget is always subject to restructuring at the hands of the Indiana Lottery. In case you have not noticed, the budget for the state of Illinois is in shambles. Care to comment on that? Your revelry in bitterness will be your demise. Best of luck.
John

Louisville, KY

#8 Aug 8, 2007
Jennifer Long wrote:
Sorry Indy... no matter how much you try you'll never be more than a pit stop.
It's hardly a metropolitan city or even a burgeoning metropolitan city, it's a full on sports-centric city. Which wouldn't necessarily be a bad things thing except the citizens of Indianapolis can't be bothered to leave the comfort of their tricked-out Barcoloungers (complete with side cooler storage and handy-dandy multiple remote caddies) to attend a game. Indianapolis tried the "If you build it they will come," approach and it didn't work.
The people of Indianapolis do two things well: sit in front of the TV and shop at Wal-Mart, or Keystone at the Crossing.
YAWN...
Alan Solomon WISHES that people were dining at Dunaways. St. Elmo's is so over-rated and not at all what it used to be, a long time ago, before we were all born. Nicky Blaine's is the one cool spot in a desert. Rathskellar, same. Mass Ave. appeals to so few. And Broadripple to too many, unfortunately, most of them backward hat wearing types and the bimbo's who love them.
It would be nice if someone read this article and then actually bought tickets to a show at Phoenix or came to see a jazz concert at the zoo. But they won't. It would mean actually leaving the comfy confines of the 'burbs.
In reality, Indianapolis is all about Applebee's and Chuck E. Cheese. If that is your idea of (manufactured) entertainment and good food then Indianapolis is your town. Load up on your snack foods and beer, park yer butt in front of the big screen and have at it.
OK... my final comment on how backward Indianapolis is. Their hope on revitalizing the state budget relies on lottery sales.
Cue the banjo's.
I don't get this response at all. I have lived for a reasonable amount of time in many cities. Some you probably wouldn't think as being metropolitan at all, Allentown, Durham, Charlotte and some I would hope that you would consider metropolitan, NYC, Philly and Dallas. I moved to Indianapolis from Dallas about 7 years ago and I must say I was very pleasantly surprised by this city. Is it Chicago? Not by any stretch. But it is metropolitan enough that I don't necessarily miss the big city and small enough to avoid some of the big city hassles. There are plenty of good local and unique eateries and you are an idiot if you can't find something interesting to do. If you want chain restaurants, try Dallas where I lived within 10 minutes of about 5 malls and 20 Applebees. Downtown and several other locations around town are active at all times of the day. Downtown is a destination point unlike many large cities around the country. No offense to others living in Indiana but I do find Indiana to be at bit backwards, but I also think that Indianapolis is very different than the rest of the state. What's with all the hate on the sports fans? I have been to games at stadiums all across the country and while the stadium is a piece of crap, it rocks like no other. You can't get a good ticket, they are always sold out, and I have never left without being practically deaf until the next morning. It hasn't always been that way from what I understand, basketball has historically been more popular, but it has since I've lived here. People love their BLUE. I will admit that Pacer support has fallen off in the last couple of years although Conseco fieldhouse is the nicest NBA court I've been to. People here love the Pacers but it is hard to support some of the characters that have been on the team lately.

Sorry, I think your perspective is a bit askew somehow.
John

Louisville, KY

#9 Aug 8, 2007
I would like to add that the Indiana state budget has done very nicely this past year, so much so that there is a significant debate as to what to do with the surplus. Many states wish they had that problem. The majority of states in this country have a lottery system now and the budget suffered for several years even with the lottery, so to make that characterization is unfair.
Dan

United States

#10 Aug 9, 2007
Come on, guys, lay off of Jennifer. Let's show our occasional guest from the world-famous "Third City" some Hoosier hospitality and respect that anyone willing to pay enough to live in a place like Chicago will certainly also be emotionally invested in their hometown.

Since: Apr 07

#11 Aug 9, 2007
Jennifer is half right. I am from Indy, and I have visited a few times only to see that Indy is about as middlebrow as they come in terms of sophistication and planning. There are some very beautiful areas in Indy: the Meridian-Kessler neighborhoods, the war monuments downtown, the governmental center, the Art Museum, Children’s Museum. But just when you drive around some of those areas, BAM! You drive right into some of the worst ghettos in the Midwest: the areas east of the Children’s Museum, the area west of the Art Museum. Lockerbie-Riley is very pretty and quaint, but it STILL looks isolated within a block-by-block patchwork of aging and dilapidated neighborhoods.
John

Louisville, KY

#12 Aug 9, 2007
Robert Salm wrote:
Jennifer is half right. I am from Indy, and I have visited a few times only to see that Indy is about as middlebrow as they come in terms of sophistication and planning. There are some very beautiful areas in Indy: the Meridian-Kessler neighborhoods, the war monuments downtown, the governmental center, the Art Museum, Children’s Museum. But just when you drive around some of those areas, BAM! You drive right into some of the worst ghettos in the Midwest: the areas east of the Children’s Museum, the area west of the Art Museum. Lockerbie-Riley is very pretty and quaint, but it STILL looks isolated within a block-by-block patchwork of aging and dilapidated neighborhoods.
Sure, but that it is not what she was targeting. There are a number of aging, dilapidated and dangerous areas in Indianapolis. I have spent most of my life in other large cities and they have all had that same problem. Chicago is no different in that respect. And btw, I can't tell how often you visit but at least two of those areas, east of the Children's Museum and surrounding Lockerbie-Riley have undergone significant gentrification since I've been here. It has made a tremendous difference. It is no longer a place where you instinctively lock your car doors as you drive through.
Tara

Indianapolis, IN

#13 Aug 17, 2007
Plus the Fall Creek neighborhood revitalization project, just blocks away from The Children's Museum, has won many awards for transforming a pretty run-down neighborhood.

There is a burgeoning art scene in Indianapolis, a newly-remodeled art museum and a brand new art school on the downtown Indiana University campus. Plus, the recent additon of the small but edgey Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art has brought in works by internationally renowned contemporary artists.

Yes, Indianapolis is a sports town, but it is definitely moving in the right direction in regard to the art scene. You can't complain about that.
Josh

Indianapolis, IN

#14 Aug 21, 2007
I recently relocated to Indy from downtown Chicago (after living in Chicago all of my life) and have been amazed at how great a city Indy really is. I had never been to Indy prior to relocating, and had no opinion good or bad of the city. Yes it is not Chicago - but I was surprised at all of the great restaurants, cultural, and sports activities to take part in. If you want sophistication in planning - take a look at Carmel. I challenge anyone to name one suburb in Chicago that has developed mostly since the 1980's that is as progressive in its planning for quality of life and long term sustainability. Carmel is setting the bar high for the rest of the Indy and many of the suburbs are following suit.

The downtown is beautiful and getting better everyday. Thousands of new condos and apartments are under construction and will only help Indy's transofrmation into a 24 hour city even more. I can tell you the people of Indy love and respect Chicago and are frequent visitors(including myself). How about a little respect from our northern neighbor? Everyone knows Chitown is great, and while Indy will continue to get better - Chicago has nothing to fear. Get some self confidence Jennifer!
Joe

Indianapolis, IN

#15 Aug 21, 2007
Jennifer Long wrote:
Sorry Indy... no matter how much you try you'll never be more than a pit stop.
It's hardly a metropolitan city or even a burgeoning metropolitan city, it's a full on sports-centric city. Which wouldn't necessarily be a bad things thing except the citizens of Indianapolis can't be bothered to leave the comfort of their tricked-out Barcoloungers (complete with side cooler storage and handy-dandy multiple remote caddies) to attend a game. Indianapolis tried the "If you build it they will come," approach and it didn't work.
The people of Indianapolis do two things well: sit in front of the TV and shop at Wal-Mart, or Keystone at the Crossing.
YAWN...
Alan Solomon WISHES that people were dining at Dunaways. St. Elmo's is so over-rated and not at all what it used to be, a long time ago, before we were all born. Nicky Blaine's is the one cool spot in a desert. Rathskellar, same. Mass Ave. appeals to so few. And Broadripple to too many, unfortunately, most of them backward hat wearing types and the bimbo's who love them.
It would be nice if someone read this article and then actually bought tickets to a show at Phoenix or came to see a jazz concert at the zoo. But they won't. It would mean actually leaving the comfy confines of the 'burbs.
In reality, Indianapolis is all about Applebee's and Chuck E. Cheese. If that is your idea of (manufactured) entertainment and good food then Indianapolis is your town. Load up on your snack foods and beer, park yer butt in front of the big screen and have at it.
OK... my final comment on how backward Indianapolis is. Their hope on revitalizing the state budget relies on lottery sales.
Cue the banjo's.
Jennifer, we're sorry the Colts kicked the Bears butts, but don't take it out on us!

"Can't be bothered to attend a game?" The Colts sold out last season and this, and there is a huge waiting list for season tix. Ever attend an Indians baseball game? Granted, it's not the Cubs (who we love), but it's not uncommon to have 10,000 in attendance.

Regarding theatre, we hope you can make it back either this weekend or next (Aug 24th - Sept 2nd) for Indy FringeFest. Well over 12,000 are expected for live theatre all over Mass Ave.

I agree, too many chain restaurants, but you just don't know where to look. Other poplar local haunts include 14 West, Bazbeaux Pizza, Santorini, Deano's Vino, Bourbon Street Distillery, Acapulco Joes, Barcelona Tapas, Patachou, Shapiro's Deli...I could go on and on, and that's just in the Mile Square.

Come on Jen, give us another try!
JT from IN

Chicago, IL

#17 Aug 22, 2007
Indianapolis is lame. Seriously lame. I lived there for 5 years and you couldn't pay me enough to move back.

Half the places in this article are not that "swank" or nice.

Broad Ripple and Mass Ave? Please. Give me a break.
helena

Union, KY

#18 Aug 22, 2007
thanks for the flattering comment chicago tribute!
Indianapolis has changed quiet a bit from another rustbelt city to a very great place to be.
elliot

Walnut, IL

#19 Aug 22, 2007
My girlfriend lives in Indy, so I've had several occasions to visit, and as a city planner I can say professionally (as well as personally) that Indy is coming along quite nicely. It's not my favorite city (that will always be St. Louis), but it's clear that they've put a LOT of effort into improving the City, and they deserve credit for that.

However; the government treatment of visitors leaves everything to be desired. I parked in front of the downtown mall and got a $20 'tourist' ticket for parking a few inches too far from the curb. I went to the Mayor's office to complain (no, I didn't expect them to do anything, just hear me out), and I couldn't get in the front door, because the Mayor has a Sherriff's deputy acting as a bouncer; if she doesn't like your reasons for wanting to get in, you don't get in. In no other city in the US have I experienced this.

So I have mixed feelings about Indy; they are clearly trying to improve the city, but their government's treatment of individuals leaves everything to be desired.
helena

Union, KY

#20 Aug 22, 2007
Jennifer- you probably havent been to Indy, about 30 or 20 years ago, it wasent much of a place, giving it its nicknames IndiaNOplace and Naptown(which is just a used nickname)
but it really has changed.
And our state economy is a litte bit more complicated lol.

Since: Dec 06

Indianapolis

#21 Aug 22, 2007
Thanks Tribune for the article.

I too am a City planner...that used to work for Indianapolis and although we are not Chicago, most cities aren't! I understand that Indy may not be everyone's favorite, but something must be said for the highest growth rate of ANY large metro in the midwest. Yes, even more than precious Chicagoland.

I love Chicago and I love cities. Indianapolis will never be an urban mecca like Chicago, but it is forging its own identity and we really are focusing on our strengths. We are a sports city and we accept all sports, not just the pro teams. The downtown is really a jewel for the midwest and has benefited from a vision that was unprecendented in its day. Outside of MSP and Chicago, I challenge anyone to point to a more vibrant downtown. It won't happen...and downtown Indy continues to get better and better.(Isn't there something like $2 billion under construction RIGHT NOW?). There are certainly a lot of chain restaurants in the immediate downtownarea, but can't the same be said for the "touristy" areas of Chicago and any other large city? Mass Ave is a "local-only" corridor with a Starbucks and a Subway as the only "chains." The rest of the restaurants are local. Mass Transit is on its way and hopefully we will have the first line up and running by 2011.

Jennifer's comment was not surprising to me at all. Typical Chicago attitude towards just about any other city in the midwest. This article could have been about Cincinnati, Columbus, or even Louisville.

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