father on PCP eats his son's eyes out

father on PCP eats his son's eyes out

Posted in the Mount Sterling Forum

Florida news

Macon, GA

#1 May 19, 2009
http://www.turnto23.com/video/19477111/index ....
Some pple ask what about the children of the users well I think they would be better off without this happening to them. Don't you? This poor child has suffered so much and for what a father to eat his eyes out.
strange

Mount Sterling, KY

#2 May 19, 2009
I had heard about this over the weekend, strange, what is pcp anyway.
im from menifee

London, KY

#4 May 19, 2009
What are the street names/slang terms for
PCP
?
Angel Dust, Embalming Fluid, Killer Weed, Rocket Fuel, Supergrass.
What is
PCP
?
PCP, or phencyclidine, is a dissociative anesthetic that was developed in the 1950s as a surgical anesthetic. Its sedative and anesthetic effects are trance-like, and patients experience a feeling of being "out of body" and detached from their environment. Use of PCP in humans was discontinued in 1965, because it was found that patients often became agitated, delusional, and irrational while recovering from its anesthetic effects.
What does it look like?
PCP is a white crystalline powder that is readily soluble in water or alcohol. It has a distinctive bitter chemical taste.
How is it used?
PCP turns up on the illicit drug market in a variety of tablets, capsules, and colored powders. It is normally used in one of three ways -- snorted, smoked, or eaten. When it is smoked, PCP is often applied to a leafy material such as mint, parsley, oregano, tobacco or marijuana. Many people who use PCP may do it unknowingly because PCP is often used as an additive and can be found in marijuana, LSD, or methamphetamine.
What are its short-term effects?

PCP: At low to moderate doses, PCP can cause distinct changes in body awareness, similar to those associated with alcohol intoxication. Other effects can include shallow breathing, flushing, profuse sweating, generalized numbness of the extremities and poor muscular coordination. Use of PCP among adolescents may interfere with hormones related to normal growth and development as well as with the learning process.

At high doses, PCP can cause hallucinations as well as seizures, coma, and death (though death more often results from accidental injury or suicide during PCP intoxication). Other effects that can occur at high doses are nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, flicking up and down of the eyes, drooling, loss of balance, and dizziness. High doses can also cause effects similar to symptoms of schizophrenia, such as delusions, paranoia, disordered thinking, a sensation of distance from one's environment, and catatonia. Speech is often sparse and garbled.

PCP has sedative effects, and interactions with other central nervous system depressants, such as alcohol and benzodiazepines, can lead to coma or accidental overdose.

Many PCP users are brought to emergency rooms because of PCP's unpleasant psychological effects or because of overdoses. In a hospital or detention setting, they often become violent or suicidal, and are very dangerous to themselves and to others. They should be kept in a calm setting and should not be left alone.

Formaldehyde (the chemical used in embalming, not in PCP): Short-term exposure to formaldehyde can be fatal; however, the odor threshold is low enough that irritation of the eyes and mucous membranes will occur before these levels are achieved.
What are its long-term effects?

PCP: PCP is addicting; that is, its use often leads to psychological dependence, craving, and compulsive PCP-seeking behavior.

People who use PCP for long periods report memory loss, difficulties with speech and thinking, depression, and weight loss. These symptoms can persist up to a year after cessation of PCP use. Mood disorders also have been reported.

Formaldehyde (the chemical used in embalming, not in PCP): Long-term exposure to low levels of formaldehyde may cause respiratory difficulty, eczema, and sensitization. Formaldehyde is classified as a human carcinogen and has been linked to nasal and lung cancer, and with possible links to brain cancer and leukemia.
What is its federal classification?
Schedule II
Source
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Community Epidemiology Work Group (CEWG), Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

http://www.drugfree.org/Portal/Drug_Guide/PCP
im from menifee

London, KY

#5 May 19, 2009
PrintEmail
PCP

More Photos
What are the street names/slang terms for
PCP
?
Angel Dust, Embalming Fluid, Killer Weed, Rocket Fuel, Supergrass.
What is
PCP
?
PCP, or phencyclidine, is a dissociative anesthetic that was developed in the 1950s as a surgical anesthetic. Its sedative and anesthetic effects are trance-like, and patients experience a feeling of being "out of body" and detached from their environment. Use of PCP in humans was discontinued in 1965, because it was found that patients often became agitated, delusional, and irrational while recovering from its anesthetic effects.
What does it look like?
PCP is a white crystalline powder that is readily soluble in water or alcohol. It has a distinctive bitter chemical taste.
How is it used?
PCP turns up on the illicit drug market in a variety of tablets, capsules, and colored powders. It is normally used in one of three ways -- snorted, smoked, or eaten. When it is smoked, PCP is often applied to a leafy material such as mint, parsley, oregano, tobacco or marijuana. Many people who use PCP may do it unknowingly because PCP is often used as an additive and can be found in marijuana, LSD, or methamphetamine.
What are its short-term effects?

PCP: At low to moderate doses, PCP can cause distinct changes in body awareness, similar to those associated with alcohol intoxication. Other effects can include shallow breathing, flushing, profuse sweating, generalized numbness of the extremities and poor muscular coordination. Use of PCP among adolescents may interfere with hormones related to normal growth and development as well as with the learning process.

At high doses, PCP can cause hallucinations as well as seizures, coma, and death (though death more often results from accidental injury or suicide during PCP intoxication). Other effects that can occur at high doses are nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, flicking up and down of the eyes, drooling, loss of balance, and dizziness. High doses can also cause effects similar to symptoms of schizophrenia, such as delusions, paranoia, disordered thinking, a sensation of distance from one's environment, and catatonia. Speech is often sparse and garbled.

PCP has sedative effects, and interactions with other central nervous system depressants, such as alcohol and benzodiazepines, can lead to coma or accidental overdose.

Many PCP users are brought to emergency rooms because of PCP's unpleasant psychological effects or because of overdoses. In a hospital or detention setting, they often become violent or suicidal, and are very dangerous to themselves and to others. They should be kept in a calm setting and should not be left alone.

Formaldehyde (the chemical used in embalming, not in PCP): Short-term exposure to formaldehyde can be fatal; however, the odor threshold is low enough that irritation of the eyes and mucous membranes will occur before these levels are achieved.
What are its long-term effects?

PCP: PCP is addicting; that is, its use often leads to psychological dependence, craving, and compulsive PCP-seeking behavior.

People who use PCP for long periods report memory loss, difficulties with speech and thinking, depression, and weight loss. These symptoms can persist up to a year after cessation of PCP use. Mood disorders also have been reported.

Formaldehyde (the chemical used in embalming, not in PCP): Long-term exposure to low levels of formaldehyde may cause respiratory difficulty, eczema, and sensitization. Formaldehyde is classified as a human carcinogen and has been linked to nasal and lung cancer, and with possible links to brain cancer and leukemia.
What is its federal classification?
Schedule II
Source
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Community Epidemiology Work Group (CEWG), Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

http://www.drugfree.org/Portal/Drug_Guide/PCP
im from menifee

London, KY

#6 May 19, 2009
What are the street names/slang terms for
PCP
?
Angel Dust, Embalming Fluid, Killer Weed, Rocket Fuel, Supergrass.
What is
PCP
?
PCP, or phencyclidine, is a dissociative anesthetic that was developed in the 1950s as a surgical anesthetic. Its sedative and anesthetic effects are trance-like, and patients experience a feeling of being "out of body" and detached from their environment. Use of PCP in humans was discontinued in 1965, because it was found that patients often became agitated, delusional, and irrational while recovering from its anesthetic effects.
What does it look like?
PCP is a white crystalline powder that is readily soluble in water or alcohol. It has a distinctive bitter chemical taste.
How is it used?
PCP turns up on the illicit drug market in a variety of tablets, capsules, and colored powders. It is normally used in one of three ways -- snorted, smoked, or eaten. When it is smoked, PCP is often applied to a leafy material such as mint, parsley, oregano, tobacco or marijuana. Many people who use PCP may do it unknowingly because PCP is often used as an additive and can be found in marijuana, LSD, or methamphetamine.
What are its short-term effects?

PCP: At low to moderate doses, PCP can cause distinct changes in body awareness, similar to those associated with alcohol intoxication. Other effects can include shallow breathing, flushing, profuse sweating, generalized numbness of the extremities and poor muscular coordination. Use of PCP among adolescents may interfere with hormones related to normal growth and development as well as with the learning process.

At high doses, PCP can cause hallucinations as well as seizures, coma, and death (though death more often results from accidental injury or suicide during PCP intoxication). Other effects that can occur at high doses are nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, flicking up and down of the eyes, drooling, loss of balance, and dizziness. High doses can also cause effects similar to symptoms of schizophrenia, such as delusions, paranoia, disordered thinking, a sensation of distance from one's environment, and catatonia. Speech is often sparse and garbled.

PCP has sedative effects, and interactions with other central nervous system depressants, such as alcohol and benzodiazepines, can lead to coma or accidental overdose.
im from menifee

London, KY

#7 May 19, 2009
im from menifee

London, KY

#8 May 19, 2009
Many PCP users are brought to emergency rooms because of PCP's unpleasant psychological effects or because of overdoses. In a hospital or detention setting, they often become violent or suicidal, and are very dangerous to themselves and to others. They should be kept in a calm setting and should not be left alone.

Formaldehyde (the chemical used in embalming, not in PCP): Short-term exposure to formaldehyde can be fatal; however, the odor threshold is low enough that irritation of the eyes and mucous membranes will occur before these levels are achieved.
What are its long-term effects?

PCP: PCP is addicting; that is, its use often leads to psychological dependence, craving, and compulsive PCP-seeking behavior.

People who use PCP for long periods report memory loss, difficulties with speech and thinking, depression, and weight loss. These symptoms can persist up to a year after cessation of PCP use. Mood disorders also have been reported.

Formaldehyde (the chemical used in embalming, not in PCP): Long-term exposure to low levels of formaldehyde may cause respiratory difficulty, eczema, and sensitization. Formaldehyde is classified as a human carcinogen and has been linked to nasal and lung cancer, and with possible links to brain cancer and leukemia.
What is its federal classification?
Schedule II
Source
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Community Epidemiology Work Group (CEWG), Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
im from menifee

London, KY

#9 May 19, 2009
http://www.drugfree.org/Portal/Drug_Guide/PCP

this website link is where the above information came from, both messages
im from menifee

London, KY

#10 May 19, 2009
this is beyond belief! and why the hell did the woman leave the kid there when he kept telling her he wanted to go home?
yep

Macon, GA

#11 May 20, 2009
im from menifee wrote:
this is beyond belief! and why the hell did the woman leave the kid there when he kept telling her he wanted to go home?
Makes ya wonder what she was on to have left him there. This makes ya also wonder the hell this child has been induring for some time? Pple say what about all the kids who would be taken away from the users and I say THEY BE BETTER OFF. Not all foster homes are bad homes.

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