Teacher pay still strong on Island

Teacher pay still strong on Island

There are 339 comments on the Newsday story from Mar 8, 2009, titled Teacher pay still strong on Island. In it, Newsday reports that:

Even in the face of a souring economy, many Long Island school districts have approved hefty raises for teachers that soon will push salaries to more than $140,000 a year for the highest earners.

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Concerned

Hewlett, NY

#338 Mar 26, 2009
If you can read this slander, thank a teacher.
Slick Willie

AOL

#339 Mar 26, 2009
Timmy O Toole wrote:
and its not 10 months,,its 9 months of hardley working.
Dont forget thanksgiving recess, christmass recess, winter recess and spring recess
Yeah and last time I checked 8-2:30 isn't an 8 hour day!
Pfluger the Union Monkey

Boston, MA

#340 Mar 26, 2009
Check this out, from a town near me:


"Teachers nix raises to help lessen cuts
By HATTIE BERNSTEIN Staff Writer

BROOKLINE The 42-member Brookline Teachers Association will forgo negotiated raises to save two teachers' jobs and two programs slated for the chopping block.

In a signed letter to the school board, the teachers agreed to skip their step increases and take a reduced Cost of Living Adjustment in the next fiscal year. In all, the teachers are giving up $102,683 in contracted salary increases or an average of more than $2,000 each to save jobs and programs."

http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/apps/pbcs.dll/...
Dave

Patchogue, NY

#341 Mar 28, 2009
only 6 more days to vacation....ahhhhh sweet isnt it...
Patrick

Cos Cob, CT

#342 Mar 28, 2009
My lawfirm's profits were through the roof for 2008 ($1.4Billion). All of us 6th year associates will be receiving a 100% bonus. That mean's I'll earn $424,000 this year.

Thank you corporate America.
Another opinion

Newark, NJ

#343 Mar 28, 2009
Slick Willie wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah and last time I checked 8-2:30 isn't an 8 hour day!
And last I checked, those weren't the hours of a teacher's day. Your point?
Patrick

Cos Cob, CT

#344 Mar 28, 2009
Another opinion wrote:
<quoted text>
And last I checked, those weren't the hours of a teacher's day. Your point?
Don't forget that teachers do at least 95 hours a week of work at home; between grading papers and preparing lesson plans. Sorry, but I couldn't even type that with a straight face.
Another opinion

Newark, NJ

#345 Mar 29, 2009
Patrick wrote:
<quoted text>
Don't forget that teachers do at least 95 hours a week of work at home; between grading papers and preparing lesson plans. Sorry, but I couldn't even type that with a straight face.
I think it's been established that there is massive exaggeration on both sides of this issue. As a teacher, I know that anyone who says that I work ONLY six hours a day has no idea what my job entails, but I also know that claiming that every minute of a teacher's free time is taken up by grading and planning is ludicrous as well. Both sides need to concede that they are prone to exaggeration, I think.
Patrick

Cos Cob, CT

#346 Mar 29, 2009
Another opinion wrote:
<quoted text>
I think it's been established that there is massive exaggeration on both sides of this issue. As a teacher, I know that anyone who says that I work ONLY six hours a day has no idea what my job entails, but I also know that claiming that every minute of a teacher's free time is taken up by grading and planning is ludicrous as well. Both sides need to concede that they are prone to exaggeration, I think.
My wife's a school teacher and does her grading and her "lesson plans" (she teaches the same thing every single year and has for the past 11 years) during her "prep" period and lunch period. I would say at max she does 3-5 hours of work at home during the week. She leaves the house at 7:15 and is home by 3:35.

I won't get into the 4 weeks of vacation/time off she get's during her 8-month work "year"
get over it

Selden, NY

#347 Mar 29, 2009
Timmy O Toole wrote:
and its not 10 months,,its 9 months of hardley working.
Dont forget thanksgiving recess, christmass recess, winter recess and spring recess
Maybe you should stop complaining and go back to school. You can incur 80-90K in student loan debt, get a job as a teacher and be abused by people like you! Oh...and enjoy all your "free time."
Another opinion

Newark, NJ

#348 Mar 29, 2009
Patrick wrote:
<quoted text>
My wife's a school teacher and does her grading and her "lesson plans" (she teaches the same thing every single year and has for the past 11 years) during her "prep" period and lunch period. I would say at max she does 3-5 hours of work at home during the week. She leaves the house at 7:15 and is home by 3:35.
I won't get into the 4 weeks of vacation/time off she get's during her 8-month work "year"
Well, good for your wife. I've been teaching for nine years, and I teach something new every year. I've only had one prep remain the same for the entire time I've been teaching, but I don't teach that the same way every year. I do far more than 3-5 hours of work during the week -- in fact, that's approximately the amount of time it takes to grade two sets of papers, and I teach five classes. Oh, and I leave the house at 6:20 every morning and am NEVER home before 4. So speak for your wife -- NOT for the entire teaching population. You clearly don't know all of us.
Do not bother

AOL

#349 Mar 29, 2009
Maybe 75 years ago, when having a high school education was not the rule, teachers could make the argument that nobody knows how hard they worked. Today, where almost 100% of the population has either graduated from or at least attended school, teachers lose the argument every time.
Everyone has sat in a classroom at one time or another and can recall, in their opinion, that the job the teacher does, isn't all that tough to do.
Whenever a teacher brings up lesson plans, or grading tests, the quick reminder from a non teacher is "You work from 8-3 and have all those vacation days and summers off." You lose the argument. They don't want to hear about preparing lessons, in their eyes that isn't working because there aren't any students sitting in a classroom. To many that's what you are being paid to do. So lesson prep and grading is a moot point. Honestly, did any of us ever think of the teacher preparing lessons for us before we went into the classroom?
One thing though, Hollywood has made the teacher the butt of thousands of jokes and usually the villian in many sitcoms or movies.
Think of what gets a loud cheer from the audience, when the parent comes into the school and tells off the teacher for doing whatever to their fine upstanding boy. The audience goes wild whenever that is in a scene.
Anyway, I digress... I am a teacher and I don't bother to argue with anyone about how hard I work or how little I work. What's the use? Find me someone in any field who says they don't work hard or they aren't underpaid for what they do. This is an argument that can't be won teachers, so do not bother.
Another opinion

Newark, NJ

#350 Mar 29, 2009
Do not bother wrote:
Maybe 75 years ago, when having a high school education was not the rule, teachers could make the argument that nobody knows how hard they worked. Today, where almost 100% of the population has either graduated from or at least attended school, teachers lose the argument every time.
Everyone has sat in a classroom at one time or another and can recall, in their opinion, that the job the teacher does, isn't all that tough to do.
Whenever a teacher brings up lesson plans, or grading tests, the quick reminder from a non teacher is "You work from 8-3 and have all those vacation days and summers off." You lose the argument. They don't want to hear about preparing lessons, in their eyes that isn't working because there aren't any students sitting in a classroom. To many that's what you are being paid to do. So lesson prep and grading is a moot point. Honestly, did any of us ever think of the teacher preparing lessons for us before we went into the classroom?
One thing though, Hollywood has made the teacher the butt of thousands of jokes and usually the villian in many sitcoms or movies.
Think of what gets a loud cheer from the audience, when the parent comes into the school and tells off the teacher for doing whatever to their fine upstanding boy. The audience goes wild whenever that is in a scene.
Anyway, I digress... I am a teacher and I don't bother to argue with anyone about how hard I work or how little I work. What's the use? Find me someone in any field who says they don't work hard or they aren't underpaid for what they do. This is an argument that can't be won teachers, so do not bother.
Really good points. It's the one job where, because everyone was once in the environment (albeit not in that role), they think they're qualified to judge it. How on earth does anyone ever think this argument "I went to high school, so I know what a teacher does" works? Oh, and of course, because there are bad, lazy teachers, that means every other hardworking teacher should suffer. Clearly. You're right. It's not worth it. No one's mind ever changes because everyone's an expert on the teaching profession. Whatever.
lol

Saint Paul, IN

#351 Mar 29, 2009
and property taxes can easily be five figures. big whoop!
Do not bother

AOL

#352 Mar 30, 2009
Another opinion wrote:
<quoted text>
Really good points. It's the one job where, because everyone was once in the environment (albeit not in that role), they think they're qualified to judge it. How on earth does anyone ever think this argument "I went to high school, so I know what a teacher does" works? Oh, and of course, because there are bad, lazy teachers, that means every other hardworking teacher should suffer. Clearly. You're right. It's not worth it. No one's mind ever changes because everyone's an expert on the teaching profession. Whatever.
Does anyone ever tell a doctor aor a lawyer that their job is easy?
MAD DOG

Englewood, CO

#353 Apr 20, 2009
[...The Boards need to be tough in negotiations because double inflation rate tax increases can not continue...]
The problem IS the school boards! The teachers' union runs candidates that represent them...hand pick them and Give them logistical and financial support. They are usually tied to a teacher if not one themselves. The teacher controlled boards negotiate with the teachers, and hire & fire the teachers' bosses. Not a bad gig. No wonder the cream puff contracts.
Try and run a legitimate candidate and the union will run several other candidates against you so to make sure that Mr. or Mrs. Taxpayer can't get a foothold.
Here is the root of all the evils... high salaries, lush benefits, patronage, scandals, etc.
The fox is not only guarding the hen-house, it it running it!
Teacher Teacher

Bellmore, NY

#355 Nov 14, 2011
Schools can't afford extra programs and sports because of this economy, plus we pay teachers the highest salary and compensation package in the nation.Kids actually suffered and schools suffer because the majority of tax money goes to teachers salaries which are over the top and exorbitant not the kids. Something needs to change in teachers salaries a serious give back from teachers unions in the next few years or we are all in trouble.

Long Island Schools are in dire straights and need a Teacher Union salaries and health benefits reform immediately or we will be in even bigger trouble soon.
Union monkey

Lindenhurst, NY

#356 Nov 14, 2011
Teachers need to be fired.
Teachers Million Club

Bellmore, NY

#357 Nov 16, 2011
Schools can't afford extra programs and sports because of this economy and they are cutting programs making class sizes larger and laying off teachers at a high alarming rate, plus we pay teachers the highest salary and compensation package in the nation.Kids actually suffered and schools suffer because the majority of tax money goes to teachers salaries which are over the top and exorbitant not the kids. Something needs to change in teachers salaries a serious give back from teachers unions in the next few years or we are all in trouble.

Long Island Schools are in dire straights and need the Teacher Union salaries and health benefits reform immediately or we will be in even bigger trouble soon.

It is time for Teachers unions to give back and proof they care about kids their educations and schools, now we think they want the jobs for time off the get and high salaries not for what results are given.

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