Buyers beware of bait boxes on property

Buyers beware of bait boxes on property

Posted in the Mount Clemens Forum

Seller

Roseville, MI

#1 Jan 5, 2013
If the rat eats poison and dies in your home, it could potentially attract other undesirable pests. For instance, flies could lay their eggs on or in the rat, which will create maggots. The maggots can escape from the wall or other areas and roam throughout your home. In addition, any fleas, ticks or parasites that are on the dead rat will likely look for other hosts once the rat is dead. This means, they may look to you or the animals in your home as their new host.
Fuss face and Tigger

Roseville, MI

#2 Jan 5, 2013
CBS Chicago reports that Chicago's 47th Ward is working on a pilot program with the Tree House Humane Society where neutered, vaccinated and microchipped feral cats are being sent back out to the streets to try and deter pesky rodents.

Jenny Schlueter, the shelter's development director, explained to the station that the "Working Cats" program is an alternative to the city spreading ineffective -- and expensive -- rat poison. Instead, the presence -- specifically, the odor -- alone of a cat can help scare away rats.

If successful, the program could expand to other parts of the city.

A similar program was previously instituted in Los Angeles to help not only to help deter rats, but also to save the homeless cats' lives. The Los Angeles Times reports that the Los Angeles Police considered the program to be a success. The program is facilitated by the Voices for the Animals Foundation.

Some groups, such as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), have criticized such programs, the Washington Post reports.
Cindy

Fraser, MI

#3 Jan 6, 2013
All about Animals Rescue, Warren MI does have classes on trapping, neutering and releasing feral cats. Note-the feral cats are trapped, neutered and released in exactly the same area that they were caught in. This helps to stop the population of feral cats and it is humane to them. The classes are very popular and always full so if you have feral cats in your neighborhood and are interested sign up early.
Fuss face and Tigger

Roseville, MI

#4 Jan 6, 2013
Toxic rats, mice spur rodenticide battle
Posted by admin in News on December 31st, 2012 | 3 responses
By Peter Fimrite, San Francisco Chronicle
Poisoned rats and mice are spreading toxic chemicals into the ecosystem despite widespread pressure from federal regulators, wildlife officials and environmentalists to remove the most harmful rodenticides from store shelves.
A coalition of environmental and public health groups urged state regulators this month to reject 2013 registration renewals for the dangerous pesticides known as brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difethialone and difenacoum.
The lethal compounds, which are known as second-generation anticoagulants, interfere with blood clotting, resulting in uncontrollable bleeding and a slow, agonizing death, according to the demand letter signed by the Center for Biological Diversity, Californians for Pesticide Reform, Earthjustice and the American Bird Conservancy.
The coalition wants the California Department of Pesticide Regulation to end the use of the rodenticides, which toxics experts say can also kill hawks, owls, foxes, mountain lions and other predators that capture poisoned rodents or scavenge their contaminated carcasses.
The rodenticides have also been linked to the poisoning of pets and children, said attorney Jonathan Evans, the toxics and endangered species campaign director for the Center for Biological Diversity.
“There is no reasonable justification to have the worst of the worst toxic rat poisons still on the market,” Evans said,“especially since there is a range of other options.”
Rats and mice can do a lot of damage to electrical systems, tubing, upholstery and carpets when left unchecked, but Evans said owl boxes work better than poisons in getting rid of the ravenous rodents. A family of barn owls can gobble between 3,000 and 5,000 of the vermin in a year, according to wildlife experts.
Plastic rat boxes and old-fashioned snap and electric traps are also preferable to poisoning, he said, because they do not allow the pointy-nosed critters to run off somewhere and contaminate other species.
The demand letter, which was sent to Ann Prichard, the state’s pesticide registration chief, comes one year after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency declared it would begin the process of banning lethal anticoagulants used in rodent control products. The EPA move came shortly after the California Department of Fish and Game asked state regulators to designate second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides restricted materials.
Despite unanimous concern, no new statewide regulations have been adopted and three companies – Reckitt Benckiser, which makes D-Con; the Spectrum Group division of United Industries Corp., which makes Hot Shot and Rid-a-Rat; and Liphatech Inc., which makes Generation rodent control products – still use toxic ingredients.
Lea Brooks, the spokeswoman for the Department of Pesticide Regulation, said staff scientists have prepared a draft analysis of the effect rodenticides in bait products have on wildlife. The study, which is under review by University of California scientists, is expected to be completed in February.
“We have been evaluating rodenticide for some time at the request of the Department of Fish and Game,” Brooks said. State pesticide regulators are “very concerned about the effect of these rodenticides on wildlife. Once the analysis has been finalized, we will consider what additional measures are needed to protect wildlife from the effect of these products.”
Recent studies by UC researchers found second-generation anticoagulants in 70 percent of the mammals and 68 percent of the birds that were examined. Another study found rodenticide contamination in 75 percent of the Pacific fishers that were tested, Evans said.
Fuss face and Tigger

Roseville, MI

#5 Jan 6, 2013
Fish and Game biologists have documented poisonings in raptors and several mammals, including the endangered San Joaquin kit fox. Mountain lions and bobcats in the Santa Monica Mountains in Southern California have died from poisoning, according to biologists with the National Park Service.

A study analyzing owls found dead in British Columbia and the Yukon Territory showed that nearly three-quarters of the birds had rodenticides in their livers.

“The sick and disoriented rodents become easy prey for a hungry raptor that can consume six mice in one night,” said Cynthia Palmer, the pesticides program manager for the American Bird Conservancy.“By killing owls and hawks, those who use these secondary poisons are destroying nature’s own rodent-control system.”

The pesticide issue is huge in the Bay Area, where an estimated 10 million pounds of pesticides are used every year, much of it in rodenticides. State and federal pesticide regulators have said that as many as 15,000 children under age 6 are accidentally exposed to rat poisons nationwide each year, a disproportionate number from low-income families.

The Center for Biological Diversity co-filed a lawsuit in 2011 accusing the EPA of failing to prevent the pesticide poisonings of more than 200 endangered and threatened species, including the California condor. The plaintiffs alleged that EPA officials consistently ignored their obligation under the Endangered Species Act to consult with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to determine whether pesticides being considered for registration were harming listed species or their habitats.

The EPA is moving forward with its proposed rodenticide restrictions, but the process is long and the pesticide companies are fighting. With no state or federal regulations to fall back on, the San Francisco Department of Environment began a “Don’t Take the Bait” program urging city businesses and residents not to buy or sell harmful rat poisons, but the initiative has no teeth.

“It’s been over a year now, and these products are still on the shelves,” Evans said.“It’s time to stop the bleeding and pull these poisons from the shelves.”
Fuss face and Tigger

Roseville, MI

#6 Jan 7, 2013
Hillbilly Slim

Troy, MI

#7 Jan 8, 2013
I trap my own damned rats. I got eight in the last two months.

I also trap and move feral cats that the idiot neighbor feeds. The food also attracts rats, moron!
Fuss face and Tigger

Roseville, MI

#8 Jan 8, 2013
Hillbilly Slim wrote:
I trap my own damned rats. I got eight in the last two months.
I also trap and move feral cats that the idiot neighbor feeds. The food also attracts rats, moron!
The cats don't generally solve the rodent problem by killing rats and mice -- although the cats are game for doing so if they catch them. Rather, the cats simply leave their scent. Once rodents get a whiff of feline presence, like gangsters under a gang injunction, they move on.
Paul

Roseville, MI

#9 Jan 13, 2013
I have stray cats on my street I havent had any mice or rat sightings my neighbors havent either.

I think we should try a program that is going to cost the city far less money and give cats a chance to live longer.

LSI can keep their job by feeding the cats instead of the rats if the city needs to continue giving money away.
Fed Up

Madison Heights, MI

#10 Jan 13, 2013
Paul wrote:
I have stray cats on my street I havent had any mice or rat sightings my neighbors havent either.
I think we should try a program that is going to cost the city far less money and give cats a chance to live longer.
LSI can keep their job by feeding the cats instead of the rats if the city needs to continue giving money away.
We have stray cats on my street and that has not stopped the rats. They are multiplying in mass numbers. I do not want see LSI with this contract. I want to see a professional exterminator come in and take care of this problem once and for all!
Roachville

Troy, MI

#11 Jan 18, 2013
My experience has been the same as "Fed Up". the only thing the feral cats do is make noise and leave paw prints on cars. There are still plenty of rats around.
dead weight

Denver, CO

#12 Jan 18, 2013
No rats in my hood, at least of the 4 legged variety. Only bipeds in Imperials.
What dat smell

Roseville, MI

#13 Jan 21, 2013
Dont buy houses in cities putting bait boxes on vacant properties you might end up with the smell from hell.
Seller wrote:
If the rat eats poison and dies in your home, it could potentially attract other undesirable pests. For instance, flies could lay their eggs on or in the rat, which will create maggots. The maggots can escape from the wall or other areas and roam throughout your home. In addition, any fleas, ticks or parasites that are on the dead rat will likely look for other hosts once the rat is dead. This means, they may look to you or the animals in your home as their new host.
Just thinking

Roseville, MI

#14 Feb 6, 2013
Is Macomb County mixed up with the rat baiting or is the city acting alone?
Fed Up

Madison Heights, MI

#15 Feb 6, 2013
Just thinking wrote:
Is Macomb County mixed up with the rat baiting or is the city acting alone?
Grosse Pointe was baiting for awhile. I don't know if they still are or not. They have kept very quite on it since they had received negative publicity on the news. I have seen the bait boxes at some of the establishments in Roseville.
Poison

Roseville, MI

#16 Feb 13, 2013
http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/136...

Pets have died R we going to continue until a child gets sick or dies?
deu

Roseville, MI

#17 Feb 14, 2013
Poison wrote:
http://www.allvoices.com/contr ibuted-news/13628503-californi as-lethal-rat-poison-toxic-to- other-animals-pets-and-childre n
Pets have died R we going to continue until a child gets sick or dies?
They never thought of this when they set out the poisons.
Erin

Roseville, MI

#18 Mar 24, 2013
Rats duct tape and sexual pleasure.
just do it

Macomb, MI

#19 May 9, 2013
Stop the "rat problem" Easy clean up your property. I see open garbage cans next to the side door, seen from the street. Junk around the yards, grass uncut. People are lazy pigs. City has code enforcement laws. Ticket these people and haul them into court. And if you think the outside looks like trash inside is the same.
Grassy Custard

Roseville, MI

#20 May 9, 2013
just do it wrote:
Stop the "rat problem" Easy clean up your property. I see open garbage cans next to the side door, seen from the street. Junk around the yards, grass uncut. People are lazy pigs. City has code enforcement laws. Ticket these people and haul them into court. And if you think the outside looks like trash inside is the same.
Where is Sandy?

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