Highway Patrol has surplus vehicles for sale

RALEIGH The North Carolina State Highway Patrol has over 200 surplus vehicles for sale. Full Story
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Bat Masterson

Bronx, NY

#85 Jun 7, 2009
local wrote:
<quoted text>
They are on a meal brake, moron. They work 12 hour shifts. They are entitled to a break every now and then.
Shouldn't meal breaks be staggered so someone is still on patrol ?
Its Like This

United States

#86 Jun 8, 2009
Joob, THANK YOU! I read every single post shaking my head and sighing and then I read your and cracked up. Again, thank you!

Germaine, you made me laugh too. It has been my experience that Yona tends to know everything. He informed me last week that I was wrong about a field of medicine that I previously worked. So ...

As for the NCSHP or police officers or sheriff's deputies eating breakfast, lunch or dinner they all do not go to eat at one time. And, they like EMS, will leave their meal to respond to an emergency if they need to. No one expects them to have a working lunch or dinner. I don't know, nor would I ever expect any LEO to sit in his or her car on the side of the road and eat. That is crazy! And guess what, my tax dollars doesn't pay for their meals. I have witnessed them paying for their own meals. So yeah, they may get a free coffee or soda at McDonald's - but that is at McDonald's expense, not mine.

Noobs

Banner Elk, NC

#87 Jun 9, 2009
Vehicles conficsated from honest citizens? Don't buy from the pigs.
Parsnips

Greenville, SC

#88 Jun 9, 2009
germaine wrote:
<quoted text> HOLY CRAP...you are CRAZY as a shithouse rat!
Hey shithouse rats ain't that bad.
Keith former mos 13B10

United States

#89 Jun 10, 2009
Parsnips wrote:
<quoted text>
Hey shithouse rats ain't that bad.
Makes right nice pets.
DOD

Frankfort, KY

#91 Nov 29, 2012
For those of you that are not familiar with the logic of cost/benefit, trading these vehicles in before they are run into the ground makes economic sense for the state. First,costs associated with maintaining a vehicle as it accumulates higher miles increases beyond the normal brakes, tires and oil changes.
Secondly, the resale value of especially the Chargers is very high so it's worthwhile from a cost/benefit perspective to sell the old ones while they still retain value. If the cost or acquiring a new vehicle at a lower fleet price is amortized against the cost of maintaining a higher mileage vehicle with the value of the resale it makes sense to purchase new vehicles.
ha ha ha ha ha

Holly Springs, NC

#92 Dec 5, 2012
JBB wrote:
Would you want yourself or loves ones depending on a Trooper to get there on a vehicle that is very old with a lot of road miles and has had some major issue being in the shop all the time.
Troopers don't respond to emergencies, they patrol highways waiting to hand out tickets.
FlipTheByrd

Weaverville, NC

#93 Dec 8, 2012
Stypen wrote:
<quoted text>
Wow. You've got some issues, man. Not to mention a lot of spare time. Good luck with that....and I hope you never need APD for anything.
I don't. Fair deal. Moving on.
Scott Vandenbosch

Allendale, MI

#95 Dec 22, 2012
They tend to sell the cars before any major repairs have to be done that way they can get top dollar. I would advise staying away from any ex-police, firefighter, dnr, etc cars/trucks.
ApePeeD

Asheville, NC

#97 Jan 2, 2013
Scott Vandenbosch wrote:
They tend to sell the cars before any major repairs have to be done that way they can get top dollar. I would advise staying away from any ex-police, firefighter, dnr, etc cars/trucks.
Any item that has been used in a commercial environment will have lots of wear and tear. It's one thing to buy a car secondhand from your neighbor; it's another thing to buy a car that's constantly being used to chase people at high speeds in gunfights.
john

Garner, NC

#99 Feb 8, 2013
Does anyone think for a minute that when they are hired for little money and already risk their lives on a daily basis faced with morons that want to hurt them, that the officer or Trooper wants to overtake a vehicle going 100 miles per hour in a piece of junk? most officers are going to watch them go by and wait for the call to come out that they just struck a bus full of kids or a family of 4. Realistically most officers have families they do the job because it makes them feel good to get bad folks off the street. Most of them respond to a number of bank robberies armed robberies, child abduction calls, domestic violence on the highway, drunk driver in excess of 100 mph.

You need to ask yourselves the question of is a measly 3000 dollars in savings per car worth the potential lawsuits the state would incur. The lawsuits would be from the officers family as well as the innocent family driving down the road. To mitigate risk is the key. So if a new car is issued to an officer and they wreck at high speeds they can say the officer made a mistake. Legally it's a whole lot easier to stay out of lawsuits. LOKEL's way would bring law suits worth Billions of dollars to the table and in turn be in worse shape than if they had just bought the car.

It's like saying why do police officers need guns. As a retired police officer I can say I would not have gone to work without my gun and if they said we couldn't carry guns more than 3/4 of all police officers would quit and who would help you when you call 911 dominos pizza delivery man?

Lets think before we start pointing fingers, if you are a computer networking guy then stay in your lane. YOU DON'T KNOW!
ApePeeD

Asheville, NC

#100 Feb 8, 2013
john wrote:
Does anyone think for a minute that when they are hired for little money and already risk their lives on a daily basis faced with morons that want to hurt them, that the officer or Trooper wants to overtake a vehicle going 100 miles per hour in a piece of junk? most officers are going to watch them go by and wait for the call to come out that they just struck a bus full of kids or a family of 4. Realistically most officers have families they do the job because it makes them feel good to get bad folks off the street. Most of them respond to a number of bank robberies armed robberies, child abduction calls, domestic violence on the highway, drunk driver in excess of 100 mph.
You need to ask yourselves the question of is a measly 3000 dollars in savings per car worth the potential lawsuits the state would incur. The lawsuits would be from the officers family as well as the innocent family driving down the road. To mitigate risk is the key. So if a new car is issued to an officer and they wreck at high speeds they can say the officer made a mistake. Legally it's a whole lot easier to stay out of lawsuits. LOKEL's way would bring law suits worth Billions of dollars to the table and in turn be in worse shape than if they had just bought the car.
It's like saying why do police officers need guns. As a retired police officer I can say I would not have gone to work without my gun and if they said we couldn't carry guns more than 3/4 of all police officers would quit and who would help you when you call 911 dominos pizza delivery man?
Lets think before we start pointing fingers, if you are a computer networking guy then stay in your lane. YOU DON'T KNOW!
Butt hurt?
Former Buyer

Clayton, NC

#101 May 10, 2013
LOKEL wrote:
If they are safe, and in good enough condition to sell to the citizens of the Great North State ... then why can't they be distributed to various State agencies instead of purchasing new vehicles ...
They are often sold to other dept's and also the community college
systems, as well as NC Justice Academy and other training facilities.
ron

Kenly, NC

#102 May 26, 2013
Try and carry all of your equipment in a small car. As a retired trooper I drove a suv and I will tell you I had a lot of equipment and needed all the space. The highway patrol buys there own cars and they want to try and sell them before they are worn out, in order to get a good price to buy newer cars without having to use to much tax dollars. After awhile the cost to repair is to much for having to run high speeds, so you get a new car!!!!! The cars are repaired for anything needed before sold. For everyday driving good cars. The hemi will shift to 4 cyl. for fuel ecom. and go back to 8 for power. as of now the trooper drives the chargers to about 130,00 and the tahoes go to about 150,00 and the crowns are driven by supervisors to about 200,000.

Since: May 13

Tempe, AZ

#103 Jun 7, 2013
It may not seem like a smart idea but in reality it is. It is standard for a car used by the police to be retired after so many miles for mainly safety reasons. No one wants to be put into a dangerous position and not have the safety of their car.
Jim Creech

Wendell, NC

#104 Jan 15, 2014
Experience: I bought an old ex-cop Crown Vic. Loved it! Great performance, although gas mileage sucked. Then repairs started being necessary, and I made a horrendous discovery: Every part on it was HEAVY DUTY! Repair parts are not only expensive, but they usually have to be back-ordered. Very expensive to maintain.

Since: Mar 13

Location hidden

#105 Jan 15, 2014
LOKEL wrote:
Why is it, if the cars are worth selling, that the HP can't STOP THE PORK and drive these cars until they stop.
Dianty, I mean "local law enforcement", seems to have no problem doing that:

http://www.mountainx.com/article/53868/APD-ca...
Richard Ross

Long Beach, MS

#106 Apr 16, 2014
yona wrote:
<quoted text>
I'll hang till things get bad enough APD comes up off some of those suped up Dodge Chargers we spent millions in tax dollars for. Ever travelled outside the US? It is amazing the fuel sipping economy cars police forces use all over Europe and Asia. A little four banger tuned can do the job of the big cruiser. I tend to think the locked in the past thinking of the government buyers equates big beefy gas guzzling car as a phallus symbol to make the law enforces look and more importantly feel more impressive.
I drove a retired MHP vehicle for the first three years of my LEO career...they are still reliable enough for small departments but not for everyday Highway usage. And as for living in the past,
back during the late 70s , our department downsized to 6 cylinder Fairmonts , they didnt hold up, and when you needed to get to an emergency, they took forever....We dont drive souped up cars as our phallus as you so rudely put it...we drive adequately powered vehicle to get to emergencies to help ungrateful people like you.

Since: Mar 13

Location hidden

#107 Apr 18, 2014
Richard Ross wrote:
we drive adequately powered vehicle to get to
drive the son of the police chief to the bar

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