'Green Dreams': Cow manure turned int...

'Green Dreams': Cow manure turned into electricity | The Columbus D...

There are 38 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from May 17, 2010, titled 'Green Dreams': Cow manure turned into electricity | The Columbus D.... In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

Leon D. Weaver walks past his stock at Bridgewater Dairy in Montpelier. He turns their manure into fertilizer, electricity and more.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Columbus Dispatch.

First Prev
of 2
Next Last
Fifth Gen Farmer

La Vergne, TN

#22 May 17, 2010
How else do you expect farmers, who make up almost 2 percent of the population to feed 100 percent of it? Efficiency is key. We try to provide the best food possible at the lowest cost to the consumer. It works the best for everyone!
Dirk

Columbus, OH

#23 May 17, 2010
LMFAO @ Roundup apologists
Dannawally

Maumee, OH

#24 May 17, 2010
Bill wrote:
<quoted text>Free market economics, loosening of regulations by the Bush-Cheny administration, and cheap energy have given us disasters in the Gulf of Mexico and West Virginia mines so far this spring.
LOL! You Dimmcrats are amazing. Here we two years into the Obama disaster and you're still blaming Bush for every thing that goes wrong in the world. Any good things that happen are, of course, due to Obama's brilliance. Oh, wait, there aren't any good things.
columbusreader

Columbus, OH

#25 May 17, 2010
Feed cows grass, not corn!!!

Since: Oct 09

Columbus, OH

#26 May 17, 2010
Concerned Citizen wrote:
<quoted text>
So, help me understand, it is possible for a family farm (husband & wife) to be a factory farm if they use a state of the art barn which limits access to parasites and other diseases simply because the livestock is confined and raised as food.
It is interesting to point out that significanly less antibotics are used with this type of farming operation. Did you know that?
Oh, by the way, have you ever been inside one of these "factory farms"? Most of the farmers that I know would be happy to give you a personal tour.
The vast majority of these types of barn are owned and operated by family farms. Did you know that or do you even care about the families on the family farm?
It still the family farm, you just haven't been home in while!
CAFO is defined by Ohio Revised Code (I believe, maybe Ohio Administrative Code). Factory farm, IMO, can be a "family owned business" if it uses practices of confining animals for most of the time. But many of these large farms are LLC or incorporated, thus are not owned by a family, bur rather a business.
Overuse/misuse of anitbiotics has been well documented.
http://www.saveantibiotics.org/
http://www.hsus.org/farm/resources/research/e...

So, pick another argument, that one is just not holding up.

large factory farms also lower property values of those neighbors who are close by. They also cause fly infestations, eye irritation, and foul our water. factory farms are a BAD IDEA!

Since: Oct 09

Columbus, OH

#27 May 17, 2010
Abe Froman wrote:
<quoted text>
1. Roundup is a unique herbicide. It affects an enzyme pathway that exists in plants but not in animals. Therefore, the active ingredient in Roundup, glyphosate, is not toxic to animals except at extreme doses. The following is a quote from the summary of a recent article in a scientific journal:
"Glyphosate in the environment tends to bind tightly to soil and particulate matter and is essentially unavailable to plants and other soil organisms... Glyphosate does not bioconcentrate in fish or other animals... For terrestrial use of Roundup, minimal acute and chronic risk was predicted for potentially exposed nontarget organisms. The following taxa were evaluated: aquatic microorganisms, aquatic marcophytes, aquatic invertebrates, warm and cold water fish, amphibians (tadpoles), soil microorganisms, soil invertebrates, birds, and mammals." Giesy, J., S. Dobson and K. Solomon. 2000. Ecotoxicological risk assessment for roundup (R) herbicide. Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxiocology, Volume 167:35-120.
2. The water quality benefits of no till are not associated with pesticide runoff. No till reduces soil erosion. Soil erosion leads to cloudy water and siltation of creek and river beds, among other problems.
3. No till and pesticide use are inextricably linked. Farmers have to use some method of weed control. Before roundup and GM roundup ready crops, weed control was primarily accomplished through tillage. With roundup ready systems, farmers perform post planting weed control by spraying roundup.
"Roundup(reg) highly lethal to amphibians, finds University of Pittsburgh researcher"

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/2215...

THE TOXICITY OF ROUNDUP ORIGINAL MAXH TO 13 SPECIES OF
LARVAL AMPHIBIANS
http://www.pitt.edu/news2009/Roundup.pdf
"Roundup™ Super-Toxic For Frogs As Well As Tadpoles"
http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/200507040017...

http://www.green-talk.com/2009/08/22/say-no-t...

http://www.pananz.net/resources/Div_Loaded_Fi...

"Taken together, these data suggest that Roundup exposure may affect human reproduction and fetal development in case of contamination"
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17486286
Concerned Citizen

Columbus, OH

#28 May 17, 2010
DrC Ohio wrote:
<quoted text>
CAFO is defined by Ohio Revised Code (I believe, maybe Ohio Administrative Code). Factory farm, IMO, can be a "family owned business" if it uses practices of confining animals for most of the time. But many of these large farms are LLC or incorporated, thus are not owned by a family, bur rather a business.
Overuse/misuse of anitbiotics has been well documented.
http://www.saveantibiotics.org/
http://www.hsus.org/farm/resources/research/e...
So, pick another argument, that one is just not holding up.
large factory farms also lower property values of those neighbors who are close by.
They also cause fly infestations, eye irritation, and foul our water. factory farms are a BAD IDEA!
So if my cousin and his wife own 3 pig barns which house 9000 pigs and farms in excess of 750 acres, their farm is a factory farm. I never thought of my cousin as factory owner. Never and never will!!

It is a family farm.

Until you have taken a tour, you don't know what you are talking about!!

Just another city slicker blowing hot air!

Since: Oct 09

Columbus, OH

#29 May 17, 2010
Concerned Citizen wrote:
<quoted text>
So if my cousin and his wife own 3 pig barns which house 9000 pigs and farms in excess of 750 acres, their farm is a factory farm. I never thought of my cousin as factory owner. Never and never will!!
It is a family farm.
Until you have taken a tour, you don't know what you are talking about!!
Just another city slicker blowing hot air!
Here we go again, your arguments are about as stinking as those pig barns. Since you are losing the argument you try to change the focus of the debate. I have seen enough video and know many people that have worked on factory farms to know they are not very nice places. You can dummmy it up all you want with how the animals don't mind to not be able to stand up, turn around, etc., but lipstick on a pig is still a pig. Keep smelling that pig s--- and you'll be fine...
Abe Froman

Columbus, OH

#30 May 17, 2010
DrC Ohio wrote:
<quoted text>
"Roundup(reg) highly lethal to amphibians, finds University of Pittsburgh researcher"
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/2215...
THE TOXICITY OF ROUNDUP ORIGINAL MAXH TO 13 SPECIES OF
LARVAL AMPHIBIANS
http://www.pitt.edu/news2009/Roundup.pdf
"Roundup™ Super-Toxic For Frogs As Well As Tadpoles"
http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/200507040017...
http://www.green-talk.com/2009/08/22/say-no-t...
http://www.pananz.net/resources/Div_Loaded_Fi...
"Taken together, these data suggest that Roundup exposure may affect human reproduction and fetal development in case of contamination"
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17486286
Before this discussion goes even more off-topic, my main point was that it is difficult to make a black and white distinction. Yes, it may be true that Roundup, when applied at high concentration to an aquatic system, is harmful to some amphibians. True, I would not want to float my child's embryonic tissue in Roundup. Roundup could very well be affecting our world in some other, unknown way.

But, it is also true that Roundup is widely considered one of the most environmentally friendly herbicides (a term, I realize, that is a complete oxymoron to some.) Compared to other herbicides it has a low toxicity to animals. Unlike some herbicides, for instance atrazine, roundup does not readily run off fields into our water supply.

Roundup is not all bad. It is not all good. As with anything, there are trade-offs and compromises. Yet, I hold the opinion that Roundup, when used responsibly, can yield a net good to the environment when compared to the alternatives.(And pure organic is not a viable alternative to feed the world.)

As a side note, the Relyae paper on the effect on amphibians was not universally accepted. Similar experiments have reached the opposite conclusion. Other scientists questioned Relyae's assumptions and methods. There is an interesting critique, and response from Relyea, published at:

ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS, v. 16 issue 5, 2006, p. 2022-2034.
Greener Beaner

Bellefontaine, OH

#31 May 17, 2010
Hmmm. Five thousand acres at let's say,$3,000/acre. That comes to $15,000.000. Three thousand cows at, approximately $500/cow. That comes to $1,500,000. An anaerobic digester at $1,000,000. We've not even added in the barns, milking parlor, etc. Just what typical farm family can come up with that kind of money. We're talking big money. It always comes down to the rich folks telliing the rest of us how great it is as they destroy our lives. Just how many farm families were displaced from those five thousand acres purchased? Where did they go? Working on this mega farm? At minimum wages? Check out the these mega farms. Most of the workers are illegal aliens. Go in the door and shout "Immigration!". You'll see the biggest stampede in history and it won't be the cows.

Monsanto's monoply on Roundup is presently being investigated by the US Government and high time. They control the patented genetically modified "Roundup Ready" seeds which account for about 90% of seeds in production, today for corn and soybeans. They control the Roundup and they control the seeds. Truly scary.

As for no-til farming. Whoever foisted this idea off on the farmers must have been working for the oil and chemical industries. No-til land is a desert much of the year. Enormous mono-cultured fields with not a fence row in sight. No habitat. No food source for wildlife. Wind erosion. Land planted right up to the roads and we wonder why the bees are dying off. Soil is never replenished. Humus is not added. Just heavier and heaveier doses of chemical fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides. Most all of these are petroleum based. Efficient? Perhaps. But at what cost to our health and our environment.
ripley

Fayetteville, NC

#32 May 17, 2010
Well, I say we keep advancing ourselves into the Stone Ages.....
LAG3163

Marengo, OH

#33 May 18, 2010
Why don't we do this? Oil companies don't want it. How about the Government?
ripley

Fayetteville, NC

#34 May 18, 2010
She barked first, so the person that was bitten should have heeded the warning. BTW, if a black bear bites someone, it is euthanized. They can`t go to trial either.
ripley

Fayetteville, NC

#35 May 18, 2010
OOPS--wrong forum
Retired Military

Fort Huachuca, AZ

#36 May 20, 2010
Imagine how much energy could be converted from the daily BS that comes out of Washington D.C., the Ohio Governor’s office and Columbus City Hall. We wouldn’t have a shortage of energy.
For Real

Columbus, OH

#37 May 21, 2010
Taxes2death wrote:
Grat idea...but it's only a 'dream'. The same people who preach about this sort of thing about how it's great, are the same ones that makes excuses of not building them when it gets close to their back yard. Try to put up a solar panel or a windmill on your own property. Good luck! The township, city, state, or feds always step in and shut it down. Look at how the kennedys fought tooth and nail to get windmills not to be built off the coast of massachutsetts after screaming for years for new energy sources. The hypocrisy in this country is all but enough to keep green energy to move forward (and cost regulations).
It's only dream? really? Just google anaerobic digestors at farms and start reading. Ever heard of AgStar Program?

Ever try to put a solar panel or windmill in your house? Yes, it can be hard when the housing construction are outdated and don't address these technologies. Thankfully, some people have decided that instead of complaining, they will approach their cities and demand changes in the codes. And some cities have done it by themselves!! Imagine that!

Why is adapting the changing needs of society considered hypocrisy?

For real...
Concerned Citizen

Columbus, OH

#38 Jun 3, 2010
DrC Ohio wrote:
<quoted text>
Here we go again, your arguments are about as stinking as those pig barns. Since you are losing the argument you try to change the focus of the debate. I have seen enough video and know many people that have worked on factory farms to know they are not very nice places. You can dummmy it up all you want with how the animals don't mind to not be able to stand up, turn around, etc., but lipstick on a pig is still a pig. Keep smelling that pig s--- and you'll be fine...
You must pig s--- for brains!
Soylent Green

Columbus, OH

#39 Jun 3, 2010
Something stinks! How can this really work?

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Montpelier Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
caril ann fugate (Caril Clair of Stryker) (Aug '13) Jun 12 Jan Currie 30
Gene Ferrell is a low life scum bag... Jun 9 Citizens of Bryan 1
Bet pair of cans in town May '15 Pete 1
Last November should of been enough to state cl... May '15 Little Sister 1
amp plastics/dci plastics (Feb '13) May '15 had enough 13
18-year-old charged after man dies in fall Apr '15 J N Russell 1
Tyler Ryman (Mar '14) Mar '14 Wondering 1
More from around the web

Montpelier People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Personal Finance

Montpelier Mortgages