Author David Pelzer delivers message ...

Author David Pelzer delivers message to Reeths-Puffer students

There are 9 comments on the Muskegon Chronicle story from May 1, 2008, titled Author David Pelzer delivers message to Reeths-Puffer students. In it, Muskegon Chronicle reports that:

Author Dave Pelzer brought his message to students in the Reeths-Puffer High School gym Wednesday.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Muskegon Chronicle.

BeastyGirl15

Muskegon, MI

#1 May 2, 2008
This man was a real inspiration to those of us who were/are being abused....Thank You unky dave
LAKETON

Denver, CO

#2 May 4, 2008
My son said it was strange. That Dave is really hung up on himself. Too much self esteem.(Narcistic). That he was insulting, belittling and rude. That he basically told them that they were nothing and he was everything because he lived thru his abuse and that their problems were nothing because his problems were huge.

All in all I think that is the wrong message to send to teens. There problems may seem small to us, but they are huge to them and ignoring them or making them seem unimportant does not help them deal with them. You have to recognize the issue and help them get thru it.

Since: Aug 07

Muskegon MI

#3 May 6, 2008
LAKETON wrote:
My son said it was strange. That Dave is really hung up on himself. Too much self esteem.(Narcistic). That he was insulting, belittling and rude. That he basically told them that they were nothing and he was everything because he lived thru his abuse and that their problems were nothing because his problems were huge.
All in all I think that is the wrong message to send to teens. There problems may seem small to us, but they are huge to them and ignoring them or making them seem unimportant does not help them deal with them. You have to recognize the issue and help them get thru it.
Wow...this may be the first intelligent comment I've seen on here, other than mine of course! I think most adults forget too soon how tough things are when you're a teen. He's telling them to "get over it", and meanwhile, he's making loads of money telling this same story hundreds of times..."IT" seems a bit hypocritical...
Katelyn

Thorntown, IN

#4 May 15, 2008
i believe his stories were real and there was nothing in his book that said that he doesnt want to be there for teens. Im one myself and i never got that feeling.
Colin Matthews

Bountiful, UT

#5 May 25, 2008
As someone who was there for it, it was just really confusing...
And I agree that he felt high of himself. He was also just kinda pushy with his "message" which didn't come threw very well.
Mandeigh L

Strongsville, OH

#6 Jul 30, 2009
I had the unfortunate opportunity to meet David Pelzer when he visited my university in late April, 2009. As a true fan of his books, I was very much looking forward to meeting a man who had survived such torment and had remained strong enough to share his story. However, from the moment his speech began, he was arrogant, rude, and completely self-absorbed. Like the incident described above, he indeed did tell the audience to "get over" any past difficulties they may have endured. While I understand that not all events need to be constantly reminded of, David appears to be hypocritical considering he has made a comfortable living dwelling on his past troubles. After his presentation, I stood in line to meet him and hopefully regain my good impression, but again, he disappointed me. He simply ignored most of the fans in favor of flirting with the three twenty-somethings standing in front of me. I have since began to question what his true motivation is-does he want to help people overcome their previous torments, or does he want to help expand his bank account? While the man certainly deserves respect for what he claims he went through at the hands of his mother, spreading your message to America's youth about abuse certainly deserves more than a crude, "get over it."

Since: Jul 08

Coweta, OK

#7 Aug 7, 2009
I don't think you can ever truly "get over it" but I think things need to be worked through so you can get on with your life. I have heard the phrase "a new reality" - which talks of the way things are after something happens (death of a loved one, tragic event, abuse, etc.).

I also agree with a comment above. What teens go through may seem trivial to adults, but that is because adults have more experience with life. Teens are just learning some of the more difficult lessons of life and what could seem small to us are tremendous to them. It does no one any good to ignore problems - whether an adult's, teen's or a child's. We each have our own set of problems and each is just as big to us. Learning to work through these problems each step of the way is best, and we are changed by them. There is no going back!

I am sorry to hear of David's attitude - I really enjoyed his books and still think they are useful, but I have no desire to meet him now...
I hope his attitude changes for the best.
KVB

Abbotsford, Canada

#8 Wednesday Apr 26
Mandeigh L wrote:
I had the unfortunate opportunity to meet David Pelzer when he visited my university in late April, 2009. As a true fan of his books, I was very much looking forward to meeting a man who had survived such torment and had remained strong enough to share his story. However, from the moment his speech began, he was arrogant, rude, and completely self-absorbed. Like the incident described above, he indeed did tell the audience to "get over" any past difficulties they may have endured. While I understand that not all events need to be constantly reminded of, David appears to be hypocritical considering he has made a comfortable living dwelling on his past troubles. After his presentation, I stood in line to meet him and hopefully regain my good impression, but again, he disappointed me. He simply ignored most of the fans in favor of flirting with the three twenty-somethings standing in front of me. I have since began to question what his true motivation is-does he want to help people overcome their previous torments, or does he want to help expand his bank account? While the man certainly deserves respect for what he claims he went through at the hands of his mother, spreading your message to America's youth about abuse certainly deserves more than a crude, "get over it."
I met Dave Pelzer at a convention over 20 years ago and he handed me an autographed copy of one of his books. Upon handing the book to me, he declared that if there was anything he could ever do for me to just give him a call. Well, I waited over 20 years to make that call, and boy do I regret it! I just had the misfortune this morning of talking with him on the phone today. Foolishly, I called him thinking he might have some good insights and advice for someone who has gone through horrible emotional childhood abuse. I found him not to have one ounce of empathy or compassion and to be very rude and belittling! His tone was harsh and very condescending! So much so, that I actually hung up on him! He called back, just as rude as he was in the previous call, and I was only able to endure that call for a few minutes before I hung up on him again and blocked his phone number! I'm just so glad to find that I am not the only one that has gotten this impression from him. Maybe he was just having a bad day!
KVB

Abbotsford, Canada

#9 Wednesday Apr 26
LAKETON wrote:
My son said it was strange. That Dave is really hung up on himself. Too much self esteem.(Narcistic). That he was insulting, belittling and rude. That he basically told them that they were nothing and he was everything because he lived thru his abuse and that their problems were nothing because his problems were huge.

All in all I think that is the wrong message to send to teens. There problems may seem small to us, but they are huge to them and ignoring them or making them seem unimportant does not help them deal with them. You have to recognize the issue and help them get thru it.
I met Dave Pelzer at a convention over 20 years ago and he handed me an autographed copy of one of his books. Upon handing the book to me, he declared that if there was anything he could ever do for me to just give him a call. Well, I waited over 20 years to make that call, and boy do I regret it! I just had the misfortune this morning of talking with him on the phone today. Foolishly, I called him thinking he might have some good insights and advice for someone who has gone through horrible emotional childhood abuse. I found him not to have one ounce of empathy or compassion and to be very rude and belittling! His tone was harsh and very condescending! So much so, that I actually hung up on him! He called back, just as rude as he was in the previous call, and I was only able to endure that call for a few minutes before I hung up on him again and blocked his phone number! I'm just so glad to find that I am not the only one that has gotten this impression from him. Maybe he was just having a bad day!

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