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Bushwhacker

Seattle, WA

#40 Apr 30, 2013
Not having sex right now. I guess, according to your logic, you can't , right ??

I see why you're so bitter.

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner has carried passengers for the first time since a battery problem grounded all 50 planes worldwide, and Boeing says it already has modified the battery systems aboard more than 10 airplanes to correct the problem.

The weekend flights came more than three months after the entire Dreamliner fleet was grounded in the wake of the meltdown of the batteries aboard two 787s in January. Although investigators in the United States and Japan have not found the root cause of the problem, the Federal Aviation Administration has approved Boeing’s plan to retrofit the aircraft with a modified system that reduces the risk of a battery fire. The agency’s counterparts in Europe and Japan followed suit last week.

Launch customer All Nippon Airways was first in line for the fix, which includes improved separation of individual lithium-ion cells within the 63-pound battery and installing the battery in a heavy-duty sealed stainless steel box vented directly to the exterior of the fuselage. On Saturday, the airline completed a flight test of the new system with several airline and Boeing executives aboard.

That flight came the same day that Ethiopian Airlines resumed Dreamliner service, carrying a plane full of passengers — including Boeing vice president Randy Tinseth — from Addis Ababa to Nairobi, Kenya.
Bushwhacked

Saint Paul, MN

#41 Apr 30, 2013
Etheopian Airlines and the Gay Slewsie both say the 787 is safe. Yeah, that's all the proof anyone needs.
non-starter

Saint Paul, MN

#45 May 1, 2013
Bushwhacker wrote:
A single consultant has an opinion ??? WOW ~~!???
When he can tell why a completely burned battery short circuited, he'd be the first, SINCE IT'S BURNED !!!
A single consultant in addition to Boeing's own engineer in charge of the 787.

The 787's travails hit front pages when two lithium-ion batteries overheated in January, leaking fumes into cabins and prompting regulators to ground the fleet worldwide.

Without knowing the cause of the meltdowns, Boeing altered the 787's battery to make it less prone to heat buildup. It also redesigned the charger, and added a stainless-steel box capable of containing an explosion and venting fumes outside the jet. Boeing said these fixes would prevent fire or smoke from ever entering the cabin or compromising the plane.

Under questioning last week, the company said it would more rigorously challenge its test assumptions in the future, and that its analysis of the problem could change as more facts become known.

"If we get to the point of understanding specifically what the cause was, then we'd be in a better position to understand those assumptions," Boeing's chief 787 engineer, Mike Sinnett, said at the NTSB hearing on April 23.

The NTSB hearings also provided clues to the safety board's potential recommendations. Questions from NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman revealed that the FAA had 25 full-time people supervising the 787 program, compared with about 900 at Boeing, many of whom are authorized to sign approvals on the FAA's behalf. The ratio could prompt the NTSB to recommend more oversight, possibly complicating future approvals.

"Even more care will be taken the next time something relatively unknown is introduced into the system," said George Hamlin, an aerospace consultant, referring to the lithium-ion batteries that overheated.

"We don't know what caused it," he added. "Therefore, we don't know if it could recur."
Bob

Minneapolis, MN

#47 May 1, 2013
non-starter wrote:
<quoted text>A single consultant in addition to Boeing's own engineer in charge of the 787.
The 787's travails hit front pages when two lithium-ion batteries overheated in January, leaking fumes into cabins and prompting regulators to ground the fleet worldwide.
Without knowing the cause of the meltdowns, Boeing altered the 787's battery to make it less prone to heat buildup. It also redesigned the charger, and added a stainless-steel box capable of containing an explosion and venting fumes outside the jet. Boeing said these fixes would prevent fire or smoke from ever entering the cabin or compromising the plane.
Under questioning last week, the company said it would more rigorously challenge its test assumptions in the future, and that its analysis of the problem could change as more facts become known.
"If we get to the point of understanding specifically what the cause was, then we'd be in a better position to understand those assumptions," Boeing's chief 787 engineer, Mike Sinnett, said at the NTSB hearing on April 23.
The NTSB hearings also provided clues to the safety board's potential recommendations. Questions from NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman revealed that the FAA had 25 full-time people supervising the 787 program, compared with about 900 at Boeing, many of whom are authorized to sign approvals on the FAA's behalf. The ratio could prompt the NTSB to recommend more oversight, possibly complicating future approvals.
"Even more care will be taken the next time something relatively unknown is introduced into the system," said George Hamlin, an aerospace consultant, referring to the lithium-ion batteries that overheated.
"We don't know what caused it," he added. "Therefore, we don't know if it could recur."
It's clearly OBVIOUS that Boeing has no clue as to what caused the malfunctions on the 2 787s, heck Boeing admits it doesn't know what caused the fire/overheat.

To "design" a fix for an unknown problem isn't possible. Having worked on computer software my entire professional employment. There were fixes and formal solutions. In order to proclaim a problem was cured we had to recreate the problem and then apply the formal solution and then recreate the problem without a failure and only then was the problem really solved.

Boeing's inability to recreate the problem means they cannot claim the problem is solved, NO WAY.

As the 787 begins to fly passengers around the world all I can say is PRAY!!!
Bushwhacker

Seattle, WA

#49 May 1, 2013
A single consultant has an opinion ??? WOW ~~!???

When he can tell why a completely burned battery short circuited, he'd be the first, SINCE IT'S BURNED !!!

Guess, rebuilding a home after a mysterious fire would be a waste, huh ???

Don't live in HOUSES !!!!! They cannot explain EVERY FIRE !!!!
Bushwhacker

Minneapolis, MN

#50 May 1, 2013
NO 787s flying right now.
Bushwhacker

Seattle, WA

#51 May 1, 2013
Yeah, they are...

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner has carried passengers for the first time since a battery problem grounded all 50 planes worldwide, and Boeing says it already has modified the battery systems aboard more than 10 airplanes to correct the problem.

The weekend flights came more than three months after the entire Dreamliner fleet was grounded in the wake of the meltdown of the batteries aboard two 787s in January. Although investigators in the United States and Japan have not found the root cause of the problem, the Federal Aviation Administration has approved Boeing’s plan to retrofit the aircraft with a modified system that reduces the risk of a battery fire. The agency’s counterparts in Europe and Japan followed suit last week.

Launch customer All Nippon Airways was first in line for the fix, which includes improved separation of individual lithium-ion cells within the 63-pound battery and installing the battery in a heavy-duty sealed stainless steel box vented directly to the exterior of the fuselage. On Saturday, the airline completed a flight test of the new system with several airline and Boeing executives aboard.

That flight came the same day that Ethiopian Airlines resumed Dreamliner service, carrying a plane full of passengers — including Boeing vice president Randy Tinseth — from Addis Ababa to Nairobi, Kenya.
Bushwhacker

Minneapolis, MN

#52 May 2, 2013
NO 787s flying right now..
Bushwhacker

Seattle, WA

#53 May 3, 2013
Yeah, they are...

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner has carried passengers for the first time since a battery problem grounded all 50 planes worldwide, and Boeing says it already has modified the battery systems aboard more than 10 airplanes to correct the problem.

The weekend flights came more than three months after the entire Dreamliner fleet was grounded in the wake of the meltdown of the batteries aboard two 787s in January. Although investigators in the United States and Japan have not found the root cause of the problem, the Federal Aviation Administration has approved Boeing’s plan to retrofit the aircraft with a modified system that reduces the risk of a battery fire. The agency’s counterparts in Europe and Japan followed suit last week.

Launch customer All Nippon Airways was first in line for the fix, which includes improved separation of individual lithium-ion cells within the 63-pound battery and installing the battery in a heavy-duty sealed stainless steel box vented directly to the exterior of the fuselage. On Saturday, the airline completed a flight test of the new system with several airline and Boeing executives aboard.

That flight came the same day that Ethiopian Airlines resumed Dreamliner service, carrying a plane full of passengers — including Boeing vice president Randy Tinseth — from Addis Ababa to Nairobi, Kenya.
Bushwhacker

Minneapolis, MN

#54 May 3, 2013
NO 787s flying right now!!

NONE!
Bushwhacker

Seattle, WA

#55 May 3, 2013
Yeah, they are...

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner has carried passengers for the first time since a battery problem grounded all 50 planes worldwide, and Boeing says it already has modified the battery systems aboard more than 10 airplanes to correct the problem.

The weekend flights came more than three months after the entire Dreamliner fleet was grounded in the wake of the meltdown of the batteries aboard two 787s in January. Although investigators in the United States and Japan have not found the root cause of the problem, the Federal Aviation Administration has approved Boeing’s plan to retrofit the aircraft with a modified system that reduces the risk of a battery fire. The agency’s counterparts in Europe and Japan followed suit last week.

Launch customer All Nippon Airways was first in line for the fix, which includes improved separation of individual lithium-ion cells within the 63-pound battery and installing the battery in a heavy-duty sealed stainless steel box vented directly to the exterior of the fuselage. On Saturday, the airline completed a flight test of the new system with several airline and Boeing executives aboard.

That flight came the same day that Ethiopian Airlines resumed Dreamliner service, carrying a plane full of passengers — including Boeing vice president Randy Tinseth — from Addis Ababa to Nairobi, Kenya.
Bushwhacker

Minneapolis, MN

#56 May 6, 2013
NO (zero) 787s flying at the moment.

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