Teacher Union Thugs in Chicago Riot

Teacher Union Thugs in Chicago Riot

Posted in the Minneapolis Forum

First Prev
of 5
Next Last
DSM Local

Ankeny, IA

#1 Sep 10, 2012
400,000 students out of school all at the expense of "our" kids, sob sob sob

when will they stop being so individualistic and start caring for the collective, oh wait the collective is communist and pro-workers union

Fire all of them, get rid of the godless union
DSM Local

Ankeny, IA

#2 Sep 10, 2012
Teachers would get 16% raise over 4 years
OVER 400 Million additional lost by system

Teachers want more in addition to offer by system
free day care for students of teachers
better healthcare
more benefits!

they have more than most of their students ever will, is life really fair in that way......
DSM Local

Ankeny, IA

#3 Sep 10, 2012
Just out union wants 30% pay increase over 2! years

System says they don't have it
Remember WI

Minneapolis, MN

#4 Sep 10, 2012
NON UNIONS - that is the key to America and our success, remember these are the people that are teaching our children ?( Public SCHOOLS are the lowest form of EDUCATION in America )

TIME TO BUST THIS LIBERAL UNION ! HIRE ONLY NON UNION TEACHES and get the kids back in school.
DSM Local wrote:
400,000 students out of school all at the expense of "our" kids, sob sob sob
when will they stop being so individualistic and start caring for the collective, oh wait the collective is communist and pro-workers union
Fire all of them, get rid of the godless union
Surburban Mom

Prescott, WI

#5 Sep 10, 2012
Fire them all.
Update

Ankeny, IA

#6 Sep 10, 2012
Striking Chicago teachers head to picket lines

Last Updated 12:09 p.m. ET

(CBS News) CHICAGO - Chicago's 25,000 public school teachers went on strike for the first time in a quarter-century Monday, after the latest contract talks broke down Sunday with no deal to avert a walkout.

Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis said late Sunday night there had been some progress in contract talks, but "we have failed to reach an agreement that will prevent a labor strike."

The city's public school teachers make an average of $71,000 a year. Both sides said they were close to an agreement on wages. What apparently remains are issues involving teacher performance and accountability, which the union saw as a threat to job security.

Late Sunday, Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who has already forced teachers to lengthen their school days, said he was "disappointed" in the union's decision to continue with a strike.

"I am disappointed that we have come to this point, given that even all the other parties acknowledge how close we are because this is a strike of choice," Emanuel said. "Because of how close we are, it is a strike that is unnecessary."

After talks ended last night, Chicago Board of Education President David Vitale said he believes CPS officials made their best possible offer to teachers.

"There's only so much money in the system. There's only so many things that we can do that are available to us," Vitale said. "At this juncture, it is clearly their decision.... We've done everything we can."

Lewis said the two sides were close to agreement on a contract, but not close enough.

"We are not far apart on compensation, however we are apart on benefits," Lewis said. "We want to maintain the existing health benefits."

Lewis said the union is also concerned that a proposed new teacher evaluation system "could result in almost 6,000 teachers - or nearly 30 percent of our membership - being discharged within one or two years. This is unacceptable and leads to instability for our students."

She said the new evaluation system would rely too much on students' standardized test scores.

"This is no way to measure teacher effectiveness at all," she said.

The union has planned a 3:30 p.m. rally on Monday outside Chicago Public Schools headquarters.

A dispute involving public sector employees in Chicago was somewhat surprising, said CBS News correspondent Dean Reynolds, given the generous packages unions here have won in the past. In addition, a teacher strike in the hometown of a president who stresses the importance of education could also be seen as something of a political embarrassment.
Update

Ankeny, IA

#7 Sep 10, 2012
The union had set a midnight deadline for a walkout. Negotiations are to resume on Monday at 10 a.m. at a secret location.

Teachers began to walk picket lines at schools shortly before 6:30 a.m., and students and parents were left looking for alternatives.

Chicago Public Schools is opening about 140 schools for children from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 pm.; however, no instruction will take place.

"They're going to lose learning time," said Beatriz Fierro, whose daughter is in the fifth grade on the city's Southwest Side. "And if the whole afternoon they're going to be free, it's bad. Of course you're worried."

About 45,000 students who attend the city's charter schools will not be affected by the walkout - their schools will stay open.

In addition, churches, libraries and community organizations will be providing students with activities.

Before the strike, some parents said they would not drop their children at strange schools where they didn't know the other students or supervising adults. On Monday, as only a trickle of students arrived at some schools, April Logan said she wouldn't leave her daughter with an adult she didn't know. Her daughter, Ashanti, started school just a week earlier.

"I don't understand this, my baby just got into school," Logan said at Benjamin Mays Academy on the city's South Side before turning around and taking her daughter home.

Some students expressed anger, blaming the school district for interrupting their education.

"They're not hurting the teachers, they're hurting us," said Ta'Shara Edwards, a 16-year-old student at Robeson High School on the city's South Side. She said her mother made her come to class to do homework because so she "wouldn't suck up her light bill."

But there was anger toward teachers, as well.

"I think it's crazy. Why are they even going on strike?" asked Ebony Irvin, a 17-year-old student at Robeson.
Update

Ankeny, IA

#8 Sep 10, 2012
Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy said the police department is also putting more officers on the street to deal with potential protests, and children who might not be in school.

When he took office last year, Mayor Emanuel inherited a school district facing a $700 million budget shortfall. Not long after, his administration rescinded 4 percent raises for teachers. He then asked the union to reopen its contract and accept 2 percent pay raises in exchange for lengthening the school day for students by 90 minutes. The union refused.

Emanuel, who promised a longer school day during his campaign, then attempted to go around the union by asking teachers at individual schools to waive the contract and add 90 minutes to the day. He halted the effort after being challenged by the union before the Illinois Educational Labor Relations Board.

The district and union agreed in July on how to implement the longer school day, striking a deal to hire back 477 teachers who had been laid off rather than pay regular teachers more to work longer hours. That raised hopes the contract dispute would be settled soon, but bargaining continued on the other issues.

Emanuel and the union officials have much at stake. Unions and collective bargaining by public employees have recently come under criticism in many parts of the country, and all sides are closely monitoring who might emerge with the upper hand in the Chicago dispute.

The timing also may be inopportune for Emanuel, whose city administration is wrestling with a spike in murders and shootings in some city neighborhoods and who just agreed to take a larger role in fundraising for President Obama's re-election campaign.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-201_162-57509367/...
Angie in Minneapolis

Minneapolis, MN

#9 Sep 10, 2012
The teachers get 16 weeks off per year. They have 7 hour work days. That can retire at 52 after 30 years on the job. They have fully paid for health insurance.

Over 8% of the workforce is unemployed.

And the teachers in Chicago want a 16% salary increase on top of their current $76,000 average salary. For real?

Fire them all.

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#10 Sep 10, 2012
Another fine example of the Union looking out for your child's best interest! Emanuel should begin the process of hiring replacements, in mass, to provide the education he and his administration are required to provide. I take odds on that happening!
Bob

Minneapolis, MN

#11 Sep 10, 2012
The teachers in Chicago go on strike for higher wages yet only 15% of 4th graders in the Chicago Public Schools can read at a 4th grade level.

Reward them for not doing their job? Only in a government union does that happen. As a couple of others have said...fire them all.
Smiling Slew

Kent, WA

#12 Sep 10, 2012
Angie in Minneapolis wrote:
The teachers get 16 weeks off per year. They have 7 hour work days. That can retire at 52 after 30 years on the job. They have fully paid for health insurance.
Over 8% of the workforce is unemployed.
And the teachers in Chicago want a 16% salary increase on top of their current $76,000 average salary. For real?
Fire them all.
1.Much of that time is spent re certifying.
2.The kids "have" 7 hour work days, the teachers are always on "duty" and grade papers at home.
3.Retiring at 52 would be pretty puny retirement and imaging retirement after 30 years is pretty normal. Odd you're not happy abouit the working American taxpayer NEVER costing society.
4.The health care is the same as similar jobs and they pay part.
5.The "salary" includes ALL the benefits you listed and is an average including senior teachers, their advanced degrees, and cashing out of all accrued benefits...WHAT DOES A NEW TEACHER GET AS BASE PAY AND WHAT DOES A TEACHER AT A PRIVATE SCHOOL GET, for molding our children ???

Since: Oct 08

Location hidden

#13 Sep 10, 2012
"Look for the union label" Look no further than Chicago,!! Sad, very sad!!
Angie in Minneapolis

Minneapolis, MN

#14 Sep 10, 2012
Smiling Slew wrote:
<quoted text>
1.Much of that time is spent re certifying.
2.The kids "have" 7 hour work days, the teachers are always on "duty" and grade papers at home.
3.Retiring at 52 would be pretty puny retirement and imaging retirement after 30 years is pretty normal. Odd you're not happy abouit the working American taxpayer NEVER costing society.
4.The health care is the same as similar jobs and they pay part.
5.The "salary" includes ALL the benefits you listed and is an average including senior teachers, their advanced degrees, and cashing out of all accrued benefits...WHAT DOES A NEW TEACHER GET AS BASE PAY AND WHAT DOES A TEACHER AT A PRIVATE SCHOOL GET, for molding our children ???
Liar.

1. No they don't.
2. CPS staff hours are from 8:00 to 3:35 with a 30 minute lunch.
3. Wrong. Start at 22 upon graduation from college. 30 yrs service gives full defined benefit pension at 88% of salary with lifetime healthcare benefits paid for by the taxpayers. You also get COLA adjustments every 2 years.
4. Healthcare is fully paid for with co-pays of $5.00 per office visit.
5. The "salary" I spoke of is the average without benefits included in the package.

Not only are you rude, but you lie and are ignorant. No wonder people on here laugh at you.
Amused Slew

Minneapolis, MN

#15 Sep 10, 2012
Angie in Minneapolis wrote:
<quoted text>
Liar.
1. No they don't.
2. CPS staff hours are from 8:00 to 3:35 with a 30 minute lunch.
3. Wrong. Start at 22 upon graduation from college. 30 yrs service gives full defined benefit pension at 88% of salary with lifetime healthcare benefits paid for by the taxpayers. You also get COLA adjustments every 2 years.
4. Healthcare is fully paid for with co-pays of $5.00 per office visit.
5. The "salary" I spoke of is the average without benefits included in the package.
Not only are you rude, but you lie and are ignorant. No wonder people on here laugh at you.
You have him nailed!

IMHO, he is a compensated poster who is paid by Unions or the Obama campaign.

Either way he is doing the best to lie, cheat, insult, and otherwise force people to believe conservatives are bad people.

He is part of the Obama lieing machine, win at any cost.
Smiling Slew

Kent, WA

#16 Sep 10, 2012
Angie in Minneapolis wrote:
<quoted text>
Liar.
1. No they don't.
2. CPS staff hours are from 8:00 to 3:35 with a 30 minute lunch.
3. Wrong. Start at 22 upon graduation from college. 30 yrs service gives full defined benefit pension at 88% of salary with lifetime healthcare benefits paid for by the taxpayers. You also get COLA adjustments every 2 years.
4. Healthcare is fully paid for with co-pays of $5.00 per office visit.
5. The "salary" I spoke of is the average without benefits included in the package.
Not only are you rude, but you lie and are ignorant. No wonder people on here laugh at you.
1. Yes, teachers get trained/tested, too.
2. Teachers are there early, stay late, and grade papers ALL THE TIME.
3. So, a college education is NEEDED !! Who pays for it, how many get out in 4 years, and how many start teaching as regular teachers IMMEDIATELY(before certification testing)??? Not as subs ??? As for the pensions, BS !!
4. You said it was fully paid before, now you add a co-pay and still forget employee contributions. Proven LIE, right THERE !!!
5. The salary you spoke of is BS and you're a rude, lying, MORON, again.. Ps- Add a few commas and you sound LESS.... like a moron.
DSM Local

Ankeny, IA

#17 Sep 10, 2012
Angie in Minneapolis wrote:
The teachers get 16 weeks off per year. They have 7 hour work days. That can retire at 52 after 30 years on the job. They have fully paid for health insurance.
Over 8% of the workforce is unemployed.
And the teachers in Chicago want a 16% salary increase on top of their current $76,000 average salary. For real?
Fire them all.
I 100% agree with you, however just to correct you they were offered a 16% pay increase over 4 years and said no they want a 30% pay raise over 2 years! Talk about greedy
Those commies

Ankeny, IA

#18 Sep 10, 2012
teacher-strike-expected-to-go- into-2nd-day

By Joel Hood and Noreen S. Ahmed-Ullah

Tribune reporters

7:18 p.m. CDT, September 10, 2012
Contract talks between Chicago’s school board and its teachers union were locked in negotiations Monday evening, making it increasingly likely that the city’s first teachers strike in a quarter century would go into a second day.

While thousands of teachers marched and picketed in front of schools across the city, negotiators from both sides met for on issues that have bogged down contract talks for months – teacher compensation, a re-hire pool for laid-off teachers and job evaluations.

School Board President David Vitale left negotiations around 6:30 p.m., and said he didn’t expect the contract to be resolved today, although talks continued.

"We started out this morning by emphasizing that we are close to getting this situation resolved,” Vitale said.“That was our starting point. We spent the day exchanging proposals. Some of them are somewhat complex."

"There are other issues that are being discussed upstairs that don't require my presence,” Vitale said.“So they will continue to work on those other issues."

Mayor Rahm Emanuel on Monday met with displaced CPS students at Maranatha Church on the South Side, one of 59 faith-based organizations that are serving as “Safe Havens” for students during the strike.

Emanuel sought to reassure parents that CPS was working quickly to resolve the situation and return kids to the classroom. He again characterized the strike as “one of choice” by teachers and said that it could have been avoided.
Those commies

Ankeny, IA

#19 Sep 10, 2012
It's the wrong choice for our children,” Emanuel said
Those commies

Ankeny, IA

#20 Sep 10, 2012
The Chicago teachers strike has national implications for Emanuel, whose education reform agenda is being closely watched by national reformers and labor leaders. A prolonged work stoppage may even have ramifications in the hotly contested presidential election, as both the Obama and Romney camps said Monday they were aware of the escalating conflict and sought to assign blame.

Parents didn’t know what to expect when they dropped off their children Monday at one of the city’s 144 schools that remained open as part of the district’s strike contingency plan. Some had to cross raucous picket lines where teachers were chanting about a fair contracts or banging drums and tambourines.

Vicente Perez encountered this at Ray Elementary School in Hyde Park when he tried to drop off his 4th and 6th grade boys Monday morning.

“I don't want to go there,” said his youngest son, Kahlil, 9, prompting Perez to reconsider.

Perez called his wife on his cell phone and decided to either take the kids to a church or just keep them home.

At Disney Magnet School on the North Side, John Harvey said he was nervous dropping off his 7-year-old, Aiden, amid all the commotion.

“I don't know how they feel about us bringing our children,” said Harvey.“We're a little at odds now. I didn't know if we were hurting the situation or not. I didn't know what they were going to do. So I came with my shield up.”

Aiden's mother, Sarah Vanderstow, said she had concerns dropping the second grader off at an unfamiliar place, but since their usual school, Nettelhorst, was closed, they had no choice.

“I don't know who these people are who will be watching him and that concerns me,” she said.“But I have to go to work and we can't afford to pay for him to go somewhere else all day.”

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 5
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Minneapolis Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Woman must take down Trump 2 hr Crassus 3
Racism: Tips & Tools for White People 2 hr Crassus 3
News Global warming 'undeniable,' scientists say (Jul '10) 5 hr LIbEralS 37,418
Rocket Man! 7 hr Irish 9
Earthquake: Little Girl Trapped in the Rubble 7 hr Irish 1
Hurricane Maria Ah Yah Yea 7 hr Irish 1
Irish: I'm Back 7 hr Irish 1

Minneapolis Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Minneapolis Mortgages