ADHD Study: Should we wait or medicate?

Two new studies are out suggesting some children with ADHD may simply out grow the disorder. Full Story
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Lindsey

Minneapolis, MN

#1 Nov 13, 2007
I'm not sure I believe that children outgrow this disorder. What does happen with patience, love, guidance, help from the academic community, and help from the medical community, including medication if needed, is that as they grow they learn different coping skills to deal with this disorder that may allow them to decrease or eliminate their medication.

I have raised a child with ADHD. I am thankful that her first grade teacher noticed something right away. I took her to her doctor to be evaluated for ADHD and medication was prescribed. She also has an underlying borderline learning disability. She had been told throughout her middle school and high school years that she would never go to college. This coming from teachers who unfortunately did not understand this disorder.

Given the high rate of substance abuse, depression, and low self-esteem that is prevelent in children with ADHD I fail to understand why parents, educatrs or even some in the medical community are so resistant to using medication if it can help. If a child is diagnosed with diabetes or depression it would be considered negligent not to treat those disorders with whatever means is available, including medication.

I feel the same about ADHD. The ramifications to the child, not to mention the social ramifications with higher rates of unemployment, incarceration, divorce, are significant. To me, taking a wait and see approach is generally not in the best interests of the child when it is so crucial to catch this as early as possible and to instill good learning habits appropriate to the way the child learns, self-esteem and self-worth, all while helping the child to learn to stay on task, control their impulses, recognize consequences to their actions to enable them to have productive lives.

I am happy to say that my daughter is now 23 and just about to graduate from college. It has taken her a few years longer than 4 years to obtain a college degree, in addition to working almost full time to help pay for her education. She has worked very hard, overcome many obstacles including the stigma of having ADHD. She has continued to remain on her medication throughout her college career and if deemed appropriate by her physician, she will remain on her medication to help her with her employment.
jay

Minneapolis, MN

#2 Nov 13, 2007
It would depend on the severety,some kids and adults can live with a mild form of this without medication.
JOAN

Eden Prairie, MN

#3 Nov 13, 2007
I THINK EVENTUALY THEY WILL OUTROW.I THINK THEY TEND TO ADMINISTER MEDICINES BEFORE KNOWING FOR SURE IF IT IS ADHD.

“wheeeee!”

Since: Aug 07

Braham, MN

#4 Nov 13, 2007
I think that a lot of the time children are medicated too quickly. Most kids are hyper by nature. If it turns into a huge problem, then you should do something about it.
janey

Redmond, WA

#6 Nov 13, 2007
we should study it more b/4 we medicate any more kids. we put kids on meds to easily these days. there are ways of dealing with ADHD w/o meds
Cheri in Stillwater

Minneapolis, MN

#8 Nov 13, 2007
My husband is 52 and without a doubt has adult ADD. He runs his own business (with some help from me), has raised two kids on his own to the ages of 10 and 12 and done it all with the ADD and without medication. We, are, however, seriously thinking of seeking some at this point in time, though, because all the stresses are getting to be too much.
SCSU Student

Saint Paul, MN

#9 Nov 13, 2007
I think that many parents are to quick to medicate their children. I think that if ADHA is still a problem by middle school or if you can see your childs grades going down, then I would consider medicating them.
Nicole

AOL

#10 Nov 13, 2007
I think a lot of people misunderstand ADHD. It is much more that just a hyper child. The doctor don't just give you medicine because your child is hyper. There is much more too it than that and medication is definitely needed. Trust me, my step-son might as well not even go to school if he does not take his medicine because it is pointless, he cannot focus or concentrate.
Cheryl - Mpls

Minneapolis, MN

#11 Nov 13, 2007
When Kids have the ADHD I think it is most because they need to be better educated sooner in the grades to understand the basics.
Dave

Minneapolis, MN

#12 Nov 13, 2007
My son just went and they think he probably does have ADD (not ADHD), we took him because we went from 95th percentile in Math and Reading to the 70's in just one year (3rd to 4th grade). But his test scores did not suffer because he forgot the stuff, it's because his teacher this year let them surf the Internet as soon as they finished the test!:)-- I know I have it (even though I've never been officially diagnosed), but I will help him deal with it by teaching him what worked for me, and advice from professionals, not by the medication that doctors like to write out like candy (do they still get trips from pharmaceutical companies, or did they tighten that up)?

Colbert for President! http://Colbert08.US

Nice set Kare11 Online.
robocop67

Minnetonka, MN

#13 Nov 13, 2007
As a special education staff (15+ years), I have seen, as often as not, parents medicating their challenging children as an "easy option" to patient, consistent, loving parenting.

When I observe a 7-10+ year old on medication spending much of his/her waking hours "doped out", decling basic nutrition and walking around expressionless, then discover that to counteract the "side-effects" of those meds, the student is taking sleeping meds, I am deeply saddened.

There is an attention deficit alright, but often it is a deficit on the behalf of the parents when they fail to offer the love and attention their children desparately need.

Thank you.
Kristy

Willmar, MN

#14 Nov 13, 2007
My boyfriend of 2 1/2 years is a recent college graduate that was diagnosed and medicated for ADHD starting in the first grade. Luckily, his parents had the knowledge and the foresight to get him into behavioral therapy. They were able to teach him to recognize his actions and modify his behavior. Anyone that has been on depression medication or other mood altering drugs knows the "fog" that exists with many of them. He really hated that feeling, but due to the therapy, he was able to quit taking his medication when he entered college, after 12 years of using it. It's still a struggle sometimes, but it's an achievement for him. The problem is that many parents approach the doctors seeing them as experts, and many doctors go for the quick and easy fix that medication is. While medication may be the best option for some kids, many of them gain that focus over time, and others could be treated with behavior therapy. Medication is the rarely the answer. Parents need to take the responsibility to find answers.
Nicole - Burnsville

Minneapolis, MN

#15 Nov 13, 2007
I think my husband has ADHD-- it is an affliction that is not limited to children. Adults should definitely take medication if it is needed to live a normal life. For children, they shouldn't take medication until research proves it effective and safe. For adults, counseling is also good, at least for the wife.
Bruce Roycer

Maple Grove, MN

#16 Nov 14, 2007
Don't let these so called MD's do to our children as they have done to me for 25 years and that is medicate, but don't try to find out why our children have ADHD.

Find out what the problem is, don't let our so called doctor's rule our children.
Kristen

Kasson, MN

#17 Nov 14, 2007
I think that you shoudln't medicate them right away. Maybe talk to them alil more about there actions and take them to some classes. I do believe that some people do grow out of it. If it's not really affecting there life right now I'd hold off, but if there grades are going down and they have a bad additide towards life then I would start medicating them. Younger kids are known to be more hyper.
Anna

Brainerd, MN

#18 Nov 14, 2007
My son was diagnosed with ADHD so severe that school did not want him present without medication on board. Not because he was "bad" or uncontrolable- but the simple fact my son could not get anything out of going to school. Think of ADHD as a runaway train in a child's mind. The information, rules, and knowledge are passangers that are waiting to get on this train. The train is going so fast with no breaks- the passangers can not get on. Sure you have the occassional jumper that does make it on board...but overall- there is nothing to slow the train down.
I was totally against medication until I took my son to a neurologist, neuropsychologist, psychologist, sleep doctor and psychiatrist. These professionals showed me and explained to me that the severity of my son's condition leaves no opportunity to wait to medicate. School work is going to progressively get harder and more frusterating because he can not focus on learning- he loves school now (in Kindergarten- now he is in 2nd grade) and to aid him in loving school all throughout his experience as he grows- medication will help him so that the learning and educational part of it would not be the reason he hates school in the future (if he would even hate it). My son is not medicated into a stupor and some days emotionally and activity level is so high- that even at his hig dose of meds you would not be able to tell he is on anything. It does not control his ADHD completely- it slows the train down enough for now that he is getting what he needs and deserves from school.
He is a different person on medication and he will remind us at home if we for some reason get busy with something and "forget" his meds (we never do- we are just seeing if he pays attention to the routine) he tells us he feels better and his mind and body are going going going.(his words)
Activity helps, he played soccer and baseball last summer- rotating days and he was in karate for a while. Medication is not the giant fix all bandaid. He needs therapy, consistant- scheduled home life, school schedule/ routine, medication, extra cirricular activities and activities he likes and time to be a silly, fun, loving, kind kid that he is.
Bill _in Bavaria_

Uttenreuth, Germany

#19 Nov 14, 2007
I am 52 and found out that I have ADD Some years ago (here it is called ADS Aufmerksumkeits Disorder Symdrom). I often wonderd why I had so many problems in school and not being able to keep things in order. I see the same problems in my youngest son and now that we know what ADD is We are able to help him as well. Yes we do use Ritalin (SP?) and something called Medikanet (Ritalin similar) that can also be long time tablets. I tried Med. for a while, but gave up. Did not like the side effects.
Yes there is life with ADD and Kids do grow up and live with the disorder. We just have to watch out more. Using things like PDA's to keep track of things.
caligirl

New Bern, NC

#20 Nov 14, 2007
I've read all the posts on this site to try and gain some knowledge into ADHD. The problem that I've found is that the majority of parents/participants sharing their insights and opinions are against medication therapy for ADHD discouraging its use and promoting more traditional approaches to treatment. I do agree with the majority and feel that it's prescribed to easily. However, there are the small amount of children that do benefit from taking medication - my son being one of them. He was diagnosed with ADD at the age of six. He went from not being able to identify all letters of the alphabet by sight to reading at a second grade level within two weeks on medication. His behavior improved drastically and socially he grew. He is now ten and in the gifted program at school. He isn't a zombie on his medication and is able to function quite normally. His appetite also is minimally affected. It's been a godsend for his self-esteem and academcs. My point to readers on this board is that I'm not a bad parent for wanting my child to succeed. My child comes from a very loving home, family and environment. I can't tell you how heart-wrenching it was to put him on the medication and the inner turmoil it caused us as parents to take that step. Now, four years later I look at my son and his accomplishments and successes, we did what was right for him. It didn't take his life away, it gave it to him.

Since: Feb 07

Location hidden

#21 Nov 15, 2007
The Psychiatric Association admits they have no test for chemical imbalance which caused the psychotropic drugging of millions of people including children. There is no "Evidence-based medicine" (EBM) for their diagnoses . Just a guess.

I wouldn't take that chance with my Childs mind in the hands of a stranger in a profession that lied and uses medication without knowledge to the disease. There is no medical model.

If you take the umbilical cord that joins the Federal Disabilities Act and the Federal Department of Education, together, in programs like (FAPE) or (IDEA) that transfer monies to each State based on how many children have one of these so called disability like ADD/ADHD, Depression or Bi Polar disorder, then you can realize that your child was being psychotropic drugged for profit and was used as nothing more then laboratory mouse based on the whim of a mental health worker/counselor for the pharmaceutical and mental health profits and money for the State without concern for the child..

APA Admits there is no test for "chemical imbalance"

http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp...
Johnaerica

Humble, TX

#22 Jan 18, 2008
caligirl wrote:
I've read all the posts on this site to try and gain some knowledge into ADHD. The problem that I've found is that the majority of parents/participants sharing their insights and opinions are against medication therapy for ADHD discouraging its use and promoting more traditional approaches to treatment. I do agree with the majority and feel that it's prescribed to easily. However, there are the small amount of children that do benefit from taking medication - my son being one of them. He was diagnosed with ADD at the age of six. He went from not being able to identify all letters of the alphabet by sight to reading at a second grade level within two weeks on medication. His behavior improved drastically and socially he grew. He is now ten and in the gifted program at school. He isn't a zombie on his medication and is able to function quite normally. His appetite also is minimally affected. It's been a godsend for his self-esteem and academcs. My point to readers on this board is that I'm not a bad parent for wanting my child to succeed. My child comes from a very loving home, family and environment. I can't tell you how heart-wrenching it was to put him on the medication and the inner turmoil it caused us as parents to take that step. Now, four years later I look at my son and his accomplishments and successes, we did what was right for him. It didn't take his life away, it gave it to him.
Caligirl just curious what meds did your son take my son is very similar and we (I am ADHD also) just got diagnosed yesterday?

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