Consistent

Grantsburg, WI

#1 Mar 7, 2013
Oath
noun

1.a solemn appeal to a deity, or to some revered person or thing, to witness one's determination to speak the truth, to keep a promise, etc.: to testify upon oath.

2.a statement or promise strengthened by such an appeal.

3.a formally affirmed statement or promise accepted as an equivalent of an appeal to a deity or to a revered person or thing; affirmation.

4.the form of words in which such a statement or promise is made.

5.an irreverent or blasphemous use of the name of God or anything sacred.

(What part of this Oath of Office is ambiguous and open to Interpretation/Alternative Translation?)

"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."

Honorable people that embrace an Oath, do so voluntarily, and with a sense of sacred duty.

The horrendous impact of Political Correctness and Newspeak is that words that have meaning are now "subjective" and open to interpretation/distortion by dis-honorable people.

An "Oath" is not simply a word. It is not to be subject to the Situational Ethics of the "Oath" Taker.

When an American President violates his "Oath" of Office repeatedly,(as Barry Soetoro has) it is the Sacred Duty of his co-equal Representatives to Impeach the President for the violation of HIS "Oath".
Consistent

Grantsburg, WI

#2 Mar 7, 2013
(America needs to take the Language back from the Indoctrinators that infest the Government Schools!)

WORDS MATTER!

An individual, except the President, elected or appointed to an office of honor or profit in the civil service or uniformed services, shall take the following oath:

“I, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”
Consistent

Grantsburg, WI

#3 Mar 7, 2013
http://essentialliberty.us/about/oath/

About the Oath to the Constitution

The Constitution prescribed the following oath to be taken by the president-elect: "I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."

Regarding the Presidential Oath of Office, Justice Joseph Story wrote: "[T]he duty imposed upon him to take care, that the laws be faithfully executed, follows out the strong injunctions of his oath of office, that he will ‘preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution.’ The great object of the executive department is to accomplish this purpose." Story wrote further that if the president does not honor his oath, his office "will be utterly worthless for...the protection of rights; for the happiness, or good order, or safety of the people."

Members of Congress and commissioned military personnel are also required by statute to "solemnly swear, that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic [emphasis added]: that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion: So help me God."
Consistent

Grantsburg, WI

#4 Mar 7, 2013
“Honor”

1. Esteem due or paid to worth; high estimation; respect; consideration; reverence; veneration; manifestation of respect or reverence.

“A prophet is not without honor, save in his own country.”

2. That which rightfully attracts esteem, respect, or consideration; self-respect; dignity; courage; fidelity; especially, excellence of character; high moral worth; virtue; nobleness.

“Godlike erect, with native honor clad.”

3. Purity; chastity; - a term applied mostly to women, but becoming uncommon in usage.

“If she have forgot Honor and virtue.”

4. A nice sense of what is right, just, and true, with course of life correspondent thereto; strict conformity to the duty imposed by conscience, position, or privilege; integrity; uprightness; trustworthiness.

“Say, what is honor?’Tis the finest sense
Of justice which the human mind can frame,
Intent each lurking frailty to disclaim,
And guard the way of life from all offense
Suffered or done.”

5. That to which esteem or consideration is paid; distinguished position; high rank.

“I have given thee ... both riches, and honor.”

6. Fame, reputation, credit.

“Some in their actions do woo, and affect honor and reputation.”
“If my honor is meant anything distinct from conscience,‘Tis no more than a regard to the censure and esteem of the world”
Consistent

Saint Paul, MN

#5 Mar 7, 2013
White supremacy and mass incarceration

Republicans join the Left in calls for American prison reform but ignore the relevance of racism and social justice.

In a 2011 opinion piece in the Washington Post, Newt Gingrich said,“There is an urgent need to address the astronomical growth in the prison population, with its huge costs in dollars and lost human potential…The criminal justice system is broken, and conservatives must lead the way in fixing it.” An advocacy group called Right on Crime is spearheading Republican efforts to “demand more cost effective approaches that enhance public safety.” Signatories to its statement of principles include, in addition to Gingrich, other notable Republicans like Jeb Bush and Grover Norquist. A recent Washington Monthly article celebrated the right’s new focus on crime claiming it would “put the nation on a path to a more rational and humane correctional system.”

But by focusing on achieving “a cost effective middle ground,” Republican reform strategies end up eschewing the relevance of social justice and largely ignoring racial disparities and the disruptive social costs created by mass incarceration.

Justice and white supremacy

The travesty of mass incarceration and its devastating social effects and of the malfeasance of American jurisprudence cannot be measured purely in terms of economic rationality. It is an issue deeply entwined with long histories of racial oppression and white supremacy. True reform will require grappling with this larger problem.

A 1987 Supreme Court case illustrates what I mean when I say that the justice system is saturated with racism. In McCleskey v. Kemp, the Court declined to define the death penalty as racially discriminatory. The case involved the appeal of the death sentence for Warren McCleskey, a Georgia man convicted of armed robbery and the murder of a white policeman. In his appeal McCleskey cited research analysing 2000 Georgia homicides over an eight year period beginning in 1972 that found black defendants were nearly twice as likely to be sentenced to death as white defendants.

The research, described as the “most sophisticated study of the criminal justice system in the 20th century,” also found that the death sentence was applied 4.3 times more often when the murder victim was white. McCleskey’s appeal (based upon the 14th Amendment guarantee of equal protection and the 8th Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment), argued that the death sentence was racially biased. Justice Powell, in the majority opinion, accepted the general validity of the data and the likelihood that race was a factor in death penalty cases, but wrote that in the specific case of Warren McCleskey there was no proof of “the existence of purposeful discrimination.”

In the analysis of Bryan Stevenson, Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), the Supreme Court’s decision in McCleskey upholds the constitutionality of the Georgia death penalty, even while it validates the data showing clear racial bias. Stevenson summed up the case by arguing that in McCleskey v. Kemp the Supreme Court viewed the problem of racial bias as “too big” to confront.

Indeed, in the majority opinion Justice Powell wrote that “if we accepted McCleskey's claim that racial bias has impermissibly tainted the capital sentencing decision, we could soon be faced with similar claims as to other types of penalty…[S]ince McCleskey's claim relates to the race of his victim, other claims could apply with equally logical force to statistical disparities that correlate with the race or sex of other actors in the criminal justice system, such as defence attorneys or judges.”
Consistent

Grantsburg, WI

#6 Mar 7, 2013
Consistent wrote:
White supremacy and mass incarceration
Republicans join the Left in calls for American prison reform but ignore the relevance of racism and social justice.
In a 2011 opinion piece in the Washington Post, Newt Gingrich said,“There is an urgent need to address the astronomical growth in the prison population, with its huge costs in dollars and lost human potential…The criminal justice system is broken, and conservatives must lead the way in fixing it.” An advocacy group called Right on Crime is spearheading Republican efforts to “demand more cost effective approaches that enhance public safety.” Signatories to its statement of principles include, in addition to Gingrich, other notable Republicans like Jeb Bush and Grover Norquist. A recent Washington Monthly article celebrated the right’s new focus on crime claiming it would “put the nation on a path to a more rational and humane correctional system.”
But by focusing on achieving “a cost effective middle ground,” Republican reform strategies end up eschewing the relevance of social justice and largely ignoring racial disparities and the disruptive social costs created by mass incarceration.
Justice and white supremacy
The travesty of mass incarceration and its devastating social effects and of the malfeasance of American jurisprudence cannot be measured purely in terms of economic rationality. It is an issue deeply entwined with long histories of racial oppression and white supremacy. True reform will require grappling with this larger problem.
A 1987 Supreme Court case illustrates what I mean when I say that the justice system is saturated with racism. In McCleskey v. Kemp, the Court declined to define the death penalty as racially discriminatory. The case involved the appeal of the death sentence for Warren McCleskey, a Georgia man convicted of armed robbery and the murder of a white policeman. In his appeal McCleskey cited research analysing 2000 Georgia homicides over an eight year period beginning in 1972 that found black defendants were nearly twice as likely to be sentenced to death as white defendants.
The research, described as the “most sophisticated study of the criminal justice system in the 20th century,” also found that the death sentence was applied 4.3 times more often when the murder victim was white. McCleskey’s appeal (based upon the 14th Amendment guarantee of equal protection and the 8th Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment), argued that the death sentence was racially biased. Justice Powell, in the majority opinion, accepted the general validity of the data and the likelihood that race was a factor in death penalty cases, but wrote that in the specific case of Warren McCleskey there was no proof of “the existence of purposeful discrimination.”
In the analysis of Bryan Stevenson, Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), the Supreme Court’s decision in McCleskey upholds the constitutionality of the Georgia death penalty, even while it validates the data showing clear racial bias. Stevenson summed up the case by arguing that in McCleskey v. Kemp the Supreme Court viewed the problem of racial bias as “too big” to confront.
Indeed, in the majority opinion Justice Powell wrote that “if we accepted McCleskey's claim that racial bias has impermissibly tainted the capital sentencing decision, we could soon be faced with similar claims as to other types of penalty…[S]ince McCleskey's claim relates to the race of his victim, other claims could apply with equally logical force to statistical disparities that correlate with the race or sex of other actors in the criminal justice system, such as defence attorneys or judges.”
Victim,

This is a Thread about Honor....YOU have no business here.
CRASSUS

Green Bay, WI

#7 Mar 7, 2013
Consistent wrote:
White supremacy and mass incarceration
Republicans join the Left in calls for American prison reform but ignore the relevance of racism and social justice.
In a 2011 opinion piece in the Washington Post, Newt Gingrich said,“There is an urgent need to address the astronomical growth in the prison population, with its huge costs in dollars and lost human potential…The criminal justice system is broken, and conservatives must lead the way in fixing it.” An advocacy group called Right on Crime is spearheading Republican efforts to “demand more cost effective approaches that enhance public safety.” Signatories to its statement of principles include, in addition to Gingrich, other notable Republicans like Jeb Bush and Grover Norquist. A recent Washington Monthly article celebrated the right’s new focus on crime claiming it would “put the nation on a path to a more rational and humane correctional system.”
But by focusing on achieving “a cost effective middle ground,” Republican reform strategies end up eschewing the relevance of social justice and largely ignoring racial disparities and the disruptive social costs created by mass incarceration.
Justice and white supremacy
The travesty of mass incarceration and its devastating social effects and of the malfeasance of American jurisprudence cannot be measured purely in terms of economic rationality. It is an issue deeply entwined with long histories of racial oppression and white supremacy. True reform will require grappling with this larger problem.
A 1987 Supreme Court case illustrates what I mean when I say that the justice system is saturated with racism. In McCleskey v. Kemp, the Court declined to define the death penalty as racially discriminatory. The case involved the appeal of the death sentence for Warren McCleskey, a Georgia man convicted of armed robbery and the murder of a white policeman. In his appeal McCleskey cited research analysing 2000 Georgia homicides over an eight year period beginning in 1972 that found black defendants were nearly twice as likely to be sentenced to death as white defendants.
The research, described as the “most sophisticated study of the criminal justice system in the 20th century,” also found that the death sentence was applied 4.3 times more often when the murder victim was white. McCleskey’s appeal (based upon the 14th Amendment guarantee of equal protection and the 8th Amendment prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment), argued that the death sentence was racially biased. Justice Powell, in the majority opinion, accepted the general validity of the data and the likelihood that race was a factor in death penalty cases, but wrote that in the specific case of Warren McCleskey there was no proof of “the existence of purposeful discrimination.”
In the analysis of Bryan Stevenson, Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), the Supreme Court’s decision in McCleskey upholds the constitutionality of the Georgia death penalty, even while it validates the data showing clear racial bias. Stevenson summed up the case by arguing that in McCleskey v. Kemp the Supreme Court viewed the problem of racial bias as “too big” to confront.
Indeed, in the majority opinion Justice Powell wrote that “if we accepted McCleskey's claim that racial bias has impermissibly tainted the capital sentencing decision, we could soon be faced with similar claims as to other types of penalty…[S]ince McCleskey's claim relates to the race of his victim, other claims could apply with equally logical force to statistical disparities that correlate with the race or sex of other actors in the criminal justice system, such as defence attorneys or judges.”
What a stupid post. It only reinforces that fact that the majority of blacks are violent criminals.
Consistent

Grantsburg, WI

#8 Mar 8, 2013
Integrity

1. firm adherence to a code of especially moral or artistic values : incorruptibility

2. an unimpaired condition : soundness

3. the quality or state of being complete or undivided
: completeness

Gimme an Honest Azzhole with Integrity, over a Phony Liberal EVERY time!
Capt Crunch

Cave Creek, AZ

#9 Mar 8, 2013
Consistent wrote:
Oath
noun
1.a solemn appeal to a deity, or to some revered person or thing, to witness one's determination to speak the truth, to keep a promise, etc.: to testify upon oath.
2.a statement or promise strengthened by such an appeal.
3.a formally affirmed statement or promise accepted as an equivalent of an appeal to a deity or to a revered person or thing; affirmation.
4.the form of words in which such a statement or promise is made.
5.an irreverent or blasphemous use of the name of God or anything sacred.
(What part of this Oath of Office is ambiguous and open to Interpretation/Alternative Translation?)
"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."
Honorable people that embrace an Oath, do so voluntarily, and with a sense of sacred duty.
The horrendous impact of Political Correctness and Newspeak is that words that have meaning are now "subjective" and open to interpretation/distortion by dis-honorable people.
An "Oath" is not simply a word. It is not to be subject to the Situational Ethics of the "Oath" Taker.
When an American President violates his "Oath" of Office repeatedly,(as Barry Soetoro has) it is the Sacred Duty of his co-equal Representatives to Impeach the President for the violation of HIS "Oath".


These terms and conditions are now only found in Capt Willy Whiz Bangs book of political jokes.I am surprised that anyone else was aware of them.

“copyright -calvin- 2013”

Since: Sep 11

a lot closer than you think

#10 Mar 8, 2013
Capt Crunch wrote:
<quoted text>
These terms and conditions are now only found in Capt Willy Whiz Bangs book of political jokes.I am surprised that anyone else was aware of them.
And your accomplishments so far, are.........? Oh wait, you post one liners on a midwestern topix forum. I see.
Consistent

Grantsburg, WI

#11 Mar 8, 2013
-calvin- wrote:
<quoted text>
And your accomplishments so far, are.........? Oh wait, you post one liners on a midwestern topix forum. I see.
Your One-Liner is a real contribution to the discussion....Idddiot!
Capt Crunch

Cave Creek, AZ

#12 Mar 8, 2013
Consistent wrote:
<quoted text>
Your One-Liner is a real contribution to the discussion....Idddiot!
Don't be too hard on Calvin. I tore him up a little some time ago on this forum, and he is still smarting a little.
redeemer

Saint Paul, MN

#13 Mar 8, 2013
-calvin- wrote:
<quoted text>
And your accomplishments so far, are.........? Oh wait, you post one liners on a midwestern topix forum. I see.
WOW! welcome back Calvin,Damm you look Good,don't pay the Three stooges any mind,haven't any of them read Bugs copy/paste book hhaha crackas only glance at consistent(bugs) book and capt.cruncie drunk as fail asleep after reading a couple sentences or so. but screw them you come on back calvin.
Rich Slew

Seattle, WA

#14 Mar 9, 2013
Capt Crunch wrote:
<quoted text>
Don't be too hard on Calvin. I tore him up a little some time ago on this forum, and he is still smarting a little.
With your "razor" imagination or incontinent/incompetent "spelling" ??? Curious minds.....
Dojo Dollar Slew

Minneapolis, MN

#15 Mar 9, 2013
Rich Slew wrote:
<quoted text>With your "razor" imagination or incontinent/incompetent "spelling" ??? Curious minds.....
Another Saturday night and I ain't got nobody
I got no money cuz I got no job
How I wish I had someone to talk to
I'm in awful mess
I blew in town 40 years ago, I ain't seen a lotta girls since then
If I could find'em I could get'em but as yet I have'nt met'em
That's why I'm in the shape I'm in ohhhh

Another Saturday night and I ain't got nobody
I got no money cuz I got no job
How I wish I had someone to talk to
I'm in awful mess
Another fella told me he had a sister that looked so fine
Instead of being my deliverance, she had a strong resemblance
To a cat named Frankenstein ohhhh....

Another Saturday night and I ain't got nobody
I got no money cuz I got no job
How I wish I had someone to talk to
I'm in awful mess
It's hard for a fella, when he don't know his way around
If I can't find me a honey to help me spend her money
I'm gonna have to blow this town ohhh....

Another Saturday night and I ain't got nobody
I got no money cuz I got no job
How I wish I had someone to talk to
Im in awful mess
Bushwhacked

Seattle, WA

#17 Mar 10, 2013
Spending all of Saturday night making posts to make fun of someone having nothing to do on Saturday night ? Teabagger "reality", huh ?

Seems money, makes any night my night off. In your case, insanity makes you OFF !! LMAOROTFU~!
Bushwhacked

Minneapolis, MN

#18 Mar 10, 2013
Bushwhacked wrote:
Spending all of Saturday night making posts to make fun of someone having nothing to do on Saturday night ? Teabagger "reality", huh ?
Seems money, makes any night my night off. In your case, insanity makes you OFF !! LMAOROTFU~!
Slewsie dear, you are the only one allowed to spend every Saturday night on here. You are the only one without a life after getting fired from the Post Office. Don't those loosers know that?
Bushwhacker

Seattle, WA

#19 Mar 10, 2013
I can hear it now-
Hey dude, what did you do Sunday ??

Played gay on the e web ?? LMAOROTFU~!

Why ??

"Politics"...

Ok ??? What do you usually do ?

Ummmmm ?? Ahhhhh ?? Ohhhh ???

LMAOROFU~! You've made a great loser, pal.
Bushwhacker

Minneapolis, MN

#20 Mar 10, 2013
Bushwhacker wrote:
I can hear it now-
Hey dude, what did you do Sunday ??
Played gay on the e web ?? LMAOROTFU~!
Why ??
"Politics"...
Ok ??? What do you usually do ?
Ummmmm ?? Ahhhhh ?? Ohhhh ???
LMAOROFU~! You've made a great loser, pal.
Slewsie dear, you are the only one allowed to spend every Saturday night on here. You are the only one without a life after getting fired from the Post Office. Don't those loosers know that?

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