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1 - 6 of 6 Comments Last updated Dec 31, 2012
DSM Local

Ankeny, IA

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#1
Dec 29, 2012
 
WASHINGTON — Forget the fiscal crisis and the automatic budget cuts. Come Jan. 1, there is a threat that milk prices could rise to $6 to $8 a gallon if Congress does not pass a new farm bill that amends farm policy dating back to the Truman presidency.

Lost in the political standoff between the Obama administration and Congressional Republicans over the budget is a virtually forgotten impasse over a farm bill that covers billions of dollars in agriculture programs. Without last-minute Congressional action, the government would have to follow an antiquated 1949 farm law that would force Washington to buy milk at wildly inflated prices, creating higher prices in the dairy case. Milk now costs an average of $3.65 a gallon.

Higher prices would be based on what dairy farm production costs were in 1949, when milk production was almost all done by hand. Because of adjustments for inflation and other technical formulas, the government would be forced by law to buy milk at roughly twice the current market prices to maintain a stable milk market.

But the market would be anything but stable. Farmers, at first, would experience a financial windfall as they rushed to sell dairy products to the government at higher prices than those they would get on the commercial market. Then the prices customers pay at the supermarket would surge as shortages developed and fewer gallons of milk were available for consumers and for manufacturers of products like cheese and butter.

For dairy farmers like Dean Norton in upstate New York, who are struggling with high feed costs caused by this summer’s drought, a jump in prices would be welcomed.

“But it would be short-term euphoria followed by a long hangover that would be difficult for us to recover from,” said Mr. Norton, who is president of the New York Farm Bureau.“I don’t think customers and food processors are going to pay double what they are paying now for dairy products.”

The Senate passed a farm bill in July. A House version of the bill made it out of committee, but House leaders have yet to bring its version to the floor.
DSM Local

Ankeny, IA

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#2
Dec 29, 2012
 
Under the current program, the government sets a minimum price to cover dairy farmers’ production costs. If the market price drops below that, the government buys dairy products from farmers to buoy prices and increase demand. Since milk prices have remained above that minimum price in recent years, dairy farmers usually do better by selling their products commercially rather than to the government.

But if 1949 rules go into effect, the government would be required to buy dairy products at around $40 per hundredweight — roughly twice the current market price — to drive up the price of milk to cover dairy producers’ cost.

“It would be bad for consumer demand in the long run,” said Chris Galen, a spokesman for the National Milk Producers Federation, which represents more than 32,000 dairy farmers.

Mr. Galen and others in the dairy industry said reverting to 1949 policies could probably force the makers of butter, cheese, yogurt and other dairy products to look for cheaper alternatives, like imported milk from countries like New Zealand.

Most dairy companies declined to discuss plans to buy dairy supplies from abroad if they are forced to pay higher prices for milk.

But Land O’ Lakes, a dairy company based in Arden Hills, Minn., said the 1949 law could be potentially disruptive for dairy industry operations.

“Congress needs to pass a comprehensive farm bill that helps farmers continue to feed the world, keeps food prices affordable and provides farmers some financial stability in the very unpredictable profession of farming,” said Rebecca Lentz, a company spokeswoman.

In a conference call with reporters on Thursday, Tom Vilsack, the agriculture secretary, said the department was exploring all its options to deal with the possibility of the 1949 law going into effect.

“We will do whatever we are legally obligated to do,” said Mr. Vilsack, who declined to say what specific steps the department would take to prepare for what dairy lobbyists and industry officials are calling the “milk cliff.”

Among the options: the agriculture secretary could drag his heels on the milk purchases until Congress passes a new farm bill or an extension of the 2008 one that expired in September, said Vincent Smith, a professor of agriculture at Montana State University in Bozeman.

“This is a totally antiquated law that has nothing to do with farming conditions today,” Professor Smith said.“It was put as a poison pill to get Congress to pass a farm bill by scaring lawmakers with the prospect of higher support prices for milk and other agriculture products. Letting it go into effect for even a few months would be particularly disastrous for consumers and food processors.“
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/21/us/milk-pri...
DSM Local

Ankeny, IA

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#3
Dec 29, 2012
 
Milk free markets no government intervention.
Garys opinion

Allentown, PA

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#4
Dec 30, 2012
 
The government has no business propping up the price of anything. The market forces will take care of it by itself. If the price of milk, gasoline, or anything else gets to high, people will buy less of it and the price will fall.
The governments farm policies just funnels taxpayer money to people who collect it for not growing things.
I know somebody who had a small farm. He wasn't farming it but instead planted Christmas Trees. He never sold a tree, but did collect farm subsidies.
Anything the government does it does badly.
CRASSUS

United States

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#5
Dec 30, 2012
 

Judged:

1

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I saw a Jigger chase down and tackle a cow last night. Than he milked it. Probably sold the milk on the black market.
DSM Local

Ankeny, IA

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#7
Dec 31, 2012
 
Garys opinion wrote:
The government has no business propping up the price of anything. The market forces will take care of it by itself. If the price of milk, gasoline, or anything else gets to high, people will buy less of it and the price will fall.
The governments farm policies just funnels taxpayer money to people who collect it for not growing things.
I know somebody who had a small farm. He wasn't farming it but instead planted Christmas Trees. He never sold a tree, but did collect farm subsidies.
Anything the government does it does badly.
The funny thing is the left has been blaming the free markets as if the fact that they would buy and force the price to 7-8 dollars doesn't affect it at all, put it on the free market and if it goes up then it goes up and supply will increase and eventually it will decrease. Did you know government even forces DISCOUNTED MILK for CHEESE, why?

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