Dr George's $13,000 windfall

Dr George's $13,000 windfall

Posted in the Middletown Forum

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MaryPatsGuy

Warwick, NY

#1 Sep 15, 2012
It's amazing that our super got a $13,000 merit pay bonus for doing his job. Almost half of that money was for Assembly of Successful Central Administrative Team and Expense Reductions. How can his central office administrative team be deemed successful when he's been on the job a whopping 7 months, and he hasn't completed his first full school year? And expense reduction? Isn't that part of his job description? He saved the district $107,000 out of a $140 million dollar budget, or .00076%, and for that he was given $3500???
7vens

Hewitt, NJ

#2 Sep 15, 2012
You should read his contract MPG. It is available online somewhere.

All of these perks, and more, were built into the contract so that they could circumvent Gov. Chrisitie's ill conceived and arbitrary salary cap for superintendents. But that is a topic for another thread.

Look at it this way. We have roughly 70,000 residents in Middletown. Why shouldn't we be able to decide if we want to spend an addition 20 cents a person per year to attract the best candidates possible for arguable the most important job in the town? Since when are Republicans opposed to letting the market decide what a person should earn? I digress.

That is correct, almost all of the merit pay bonuses were based on saving the district money or generating income for the district. Off hand, I believe that he had to also come up with a better teacher evaluation system.

The timing of the merit pay is built into the contract and I believe they review his progress every April, but I may be wrong about the month.

Assembling and retaining an administrative team was important for Middletown because our board president had driven almost all of the central office administrators out of town over the past few years. Literally 90% of them left for better paying positions or promotions in other districts.

Dave Healy, ex-Middletown assistant superintendent who was demoted by our board is now the superintendent for Matawan. They wanted to reduce our BA's salary by $9,000 at a board meeting and the next day he announced he was going to Toms River for a $10,000 raise. Jim S., another ex-Middletown assistant superintendent (I won't try to spell his name) is now the super in Red Bank.

Dr. George appears to be hard working and ethical. If they wanted to keep him in the district the board had to give him the merit pay. Imagine how the board would have looked if another super left the district? That would have made 5 or 6 in 3 years I think. For the record, he worked an entire month without being paid in the district before his contract took effect last year. That alone should justify the merit pay. IMHO.
MaryPatsGuy

Warwick, NY

#3 Sep 15, 2012
I understand why they gave him the incentive clauses, but come on, who is to say that this wonderful central administrative team he's assembled won't bail in a year or 2 like all the others have. Does he give the money back? And really? He gets $3500 for saving the district .00076 percent of the overall budget?

There's something about this guy that rubs me the wrong way. I don't know if its his arrogance, the way he struts like a peacock, I'm not sure what it is. But getting a $13,000 bonus after 7 months on the job seems a bit much. I'm also sure that it was in his contract, I remember reading it, and I didn't like it then.
7vens

Hewitt, NJ

#4 Sep 15, 2012
Yeah, I didn't like it either at the time. But I've come around since. Bilboa was making more than he is as I remember. Wasn't she around $187,000?

The fact is he is the CEO of a business that provides for the education and safety of 10,000 students with about 1,500 employees.

I don't think his pay is out of line with his responsibilty.

As far as him being arogant, I don't care as long as it doesn't hamper his abilty to gain the respect and cooperation of the people who he depends upon to run the schools. I don't want to hang out with him. I just want him to do a good job.
vandy

Ventnor City, NJ

#5 Sep 15, 2012
here's what irks me- one of my kids was assigned this past week to a class with 34 kids in it- not so bad? the room is small and there is room for 24 seats- we always seem to have money for the top and not for the reason at hand, which is properly educating the kids-
marypatsguy

Brooklyn, NY

#6 Sep 15, 2012
vandy wrote:
here's what irks me- one of my kids was assigned this past week to a class with 34 kids in it- not so bad? the room is small and there is room for 24 seats- we always seem to have money for the top and not for the reason at hand, which is properly educating the kids-
Hi Vandy

I heard that too about the huge class sizes.$13000 could buy a lot of new desks. I'm hearing mixed reviews on the new schedule. Lots of chaos during the lunch periods. You hear the same thing?
7vens

Hewitt, NJ

#7 Sep 15, 2012
Come on MPG, you know better than that. It's not a question of desks vs super's salary. If you want to reduce class size you have to hire more teachers. And the merit pay wouldn't pay a teacher's salary for half the school year.
7vens

Hewitt, NJ

#8 Sep 15, 2012
And for the record MPG. I heard that the lunches went very well, no problems at all.

Since: Sep 12

Location hidden

#9 Sep 17, 2012
Testing, testing, testing!

This was just a test. Had it been and actual attempt to go off topic in a thread there would have been a variety of "off topic" comments throughout this thread. I hope I've proven my point here and given you the opportunity to try and find the management group here at Topix so you prove to them that you are an anal nudge (aka pain in the ass), just like you've already done over on NJO.

Enjoy your day, mate!
7vens wrote:
You should read his contract MPG. It is available online somewhere.
All of these perks, and more, were built into the contract so that they could circumvent Gov. Chrisitie's ill conceived and arbitrary salary cap for superintendents. But that is a topic for another thread.
Look at it this way. We have roughly 70,000 residents in Middletown. Why shouldn't we be able to decide if we want to spend an addition 20 cents a person per year to attract the best candidates possible for arguable the most important job in the town? Since when are Republicans opposed to letting the market decide what a person should earn? I digress.
That is correct, almost all of the merit pay bonuses were based on saving the district money or generating income for the district. Off hand, I believe that he had to also come up with a better teacher evaluation system.
The timing of the merit pay is built into the contract and I believe they review his progress every April, but I may be wrong about the month.
Assembling and retaining an administrative team was important for Middletown because our board president had driven almost all of the central office administrators out of town over the past few years. Literally 90% of them left for better paying positions or promotions in other districts.
Dave Healy, ex-Middletown assistant superintendent who was demoted by our board is now the superintendent for Matawan. They wanted to reduce our BA's salary by $9,000 at a board meeting and the next day he announced he was going to Toms River for a $10,000 raise. Jim S., another ex-Middletown assistant superintendent (I won't try to spell his name) is now the super in Red Bank.
Dr. George appears to be hard working and ethical. If they wanted to keep him in the district the board had to give him the merit pay. Imagine how the board would have looked if another super left the district? That would have made 5 or 6 in 3 years I think. For the record, he worked an entire month without being paid in the district before his contract took effect last year. That alone should justify the merit pay. IMHO.

Since: Sep 12

Location hidden

#10 Sep 17, 2012
LOL, aand the beauty is you can't tell I posted nor the topic of my post until you scroll down in the thread to read it.

Destroys you theory lad on how to avoid me or my posts!Gotcha!
7vens

Hewitt, NJ

#11 Sep 18, 2012
Vandy, Do you mind if I ask what grade you are talking about with 34 students in a class?
vandy

Ventnor City, NJ

#13 Sep 18, 2012
7vens wrote:
Vandy, Do you mind if I ask what grade you are talking about with 34 students in a class?
No, in fact, since you seem to have the inside info on our education program, I'll gladly tell you. It is a HS elective. How sad it is in this town that electives don't seem to get the respect they deserve or more than a pittance of money relative to the rest of the school operation/programs. Many kids do not do well in academics and need to be successful in the electives for a career or life skill yet we take away from them until they have a few dollars per kid left for the year!! Look at other local schools who have thriving students and programs in the arts areas, including acting and studio dance!! we have nothing like it. Please check it out!

I called over to see when my kid would get a seat and heard some revealing and revolting information. You see, 777's, the electives have had their funding harshly cut over the last 10+ years while enrollment has gone up- these staff members are expected to do more with less every year and the person in charge apparently raises up empty palms when they talk about supplies or over crowding- one positive note is that the band got nice new uniforms!

how would your household budget work if you had it cut in half three or four times while your in-laws moved in? how would the space issue work out if there were suddenly twice the people in your house space and your income was cut in half 3 or 4 times in 10 or 12 years?

my corporation could not function under those conditions yet we expect our teachers to eek out an education on a few bucks per kid per year!! and we are imposing more and more ridiculous hoop jumping than ever before! please tell me I am wrong 777's. go to your sources so that I can sleep better tonight.
7vens

Hewitt, NJ

#14 Sep 18, 2012
I will check it out. I'm not sure what elective you are talking about.

A lot of the funding you are talking about was cut because budgets were voted down and state aid was cut.

I'll get back to you.
7vens

Hewitt, NJ

#15 Sep 19, 2012
My magic eight ball tells me your kid's principal's name is Pat. How'd I do?

I can tell you this vandy. I don't think it is accurate to say that electives don't get the respect they deserve in this district. If electives are taking a back seat, as you claim, how can you explain that every single high school student got to choose an additional elective this year due to the block scheduling?
Instead of 7 periods there are now 8 periods and each student added an elective to their schedule.

Having said that, they don't have enough elective teachers right now. It has to do with the timing of budgeting, contract negotiations and the student's schedules.

In a perfect world the administration would have the student's schedules, determine how many teachers they need and budget for those teachers.

Because the negotiations with the union were ongoing the administrators didn't know if block scheduling was going to happen or not.

So what happened was the budget was passed, the anticipated number of teachers were hired, the contract was ratified and then the student's schedules were completed months later than normal. The exact number of teachers needed wasn't known until after the students schedules were completed long after the budget was passed.

I know vandy that you have a negative opinion of how our schools are run and I have a pretty good idea where you get it from. You have made some pretty derogatory and incendiary comments about our administrators in the past. We don't need to rehash that. Try and reserve those types of comments for the NJO forum where they are the norm.

But what about the positives from block scheduling? If you haven't already done it, go to the school district website and watch the videos about block scheduling. The core subjects have much smaller class sizes now and the teachers have more time to instruct. I think that the science classes have about twelve kids in them.

Block scheduling was a huge undertaking that has been in the works for years in the district. There were bound to be some kinks the first year. I think in general it is being well received by the students and the teachers. You too should be pleased to see the district moving forward.
MaryPatsGuy

Warwick, NY

#16 Sep 19, 2012
Hi 7vens,

Actually, I believe the teachers have less instructional time with block. They meet every other day with a given class, for 80 minutes. Last year, the classes were for 47 or 48 minutes, can't remember which. Regardless, multiply that times 2, and over a 2 day period, the teachers are actually losing anywhere from 14-16 minutes of instructional time every 2 days.

I won't argue your point about scheduling and whatnot, because I simply don't know anything about that. Having said that, if block scheduling was in the works for years as you claim, then what harm would have come to waiting one more year to make sure the schedules were tight, they had enough teachers so class sizes weren't high, and all that kinda stuff? Or maybe there was some merit pay involved for a certain educational leader to get this off the ground ASAP.
MaryPatsGuy

Warwick, NY

#17 Sep 19, 2012
Vandy

I heard the same thing about class sizes, particularly about the electives. I couldn't agree with you more about the electives. While I admit I'm not one too revved up about the arts, I think it was terrible when the district eliminated electives like wood and metal shops, automotive, things along that line. We have a mentality in this town that all students must and will go to college, and there is plenty of need for blue collar workers in things like construction, electricians, plumbers, AC and heating, mechanics, etc., well respected and in some cases, very lucrative occupations. Imagine kids using picnic tables at lunchtime made by their fellow classmates, or teachers using a lecturn made by the woodshop, or integrating these classes with things like stagecraft, or landscaping and field maintenance performed by the kids so they can take some pride and ownership in their building.
7vens

Hewitt, NJ

#18 Sep 19, 2012
Again MPG, according to the video on the district website there is more instructional time with block scheduling. I'm no expert but I don't think you factored in the time saved by not changing classes and taking attendance twice in your calculations.

Waiting a year would have solved nothing. That just means that the teacher's contract would have to be negotiated next year. Since there is no way to know how long the negotiations will take the administrators would have been in the same position next year as they were this year and they would have lost a year of block scheduling.

I don't think that there was any merit pay for Dr. George with regard to the scheduling.

I don't know why the district stopped wood shop, metal shop, auto repairÂ…etc. I know it was quite a while ago. I can imagine that insurance might have had something to do with it, but I don't know why they stopped them. You may be right that it simply reflects the mentality that high school is for preparing kids for college. That's a good question for someone to ask at a BOE meeting.
vandy

Ventnor City, NJ

#19 Sep 19, 2012
MaryPatsGuy wrote:
Vandy
I heard the same thing about class sizes, particularly about the electives. I couldn't agree with you more about the electives. While I admit I'm not one too revved up about the arts, I think it was terrible when the district eliminated electives like wood and metal shops, automotive, things along that line. We have a mentality in this town that all students must and will go to college, and there is plenty of need for blue collar workers in things like construction, electricians, plumbers, AC and heating, mechanics, etc., well respected and in some cases, very lucrative occupations. Imagine kids using picnic tables at lunchtime made by their fellow classmates, or teachers using a lecturn made by the woodshop, or integrating these classes with things like stagecraft, or landscaping and field maintenance performed by the kids so they can take some pride and ownership in their building.
Exactly right!! All of the trades need a starting place and why not in high school to train the kids who will benefit from life skills and job skills? the demand is there- is it better to have them unprepared for anything else, other than college in today's world? and many need remedial classes when they get to college so is all that college prep working? I talked to teachers who were there when the shops were ripped out because things like wood was too expensive! so they put in a phenomenal amount of expensive televison equipment where the shop was- how many tv producers do you know?

my kid took the elective to get some learning exposure in that class- I feel bad because I'd sooner find placement in an uncrowded room- but guess what? the kid wants to be in that teacher's class after meeting the teacher! it's called inspiration and motivation- thank goodness that is not a budget item they can cut out!
7vens

Hewitt, NJ

#20 Sep 20, 2012
Your kid will be fine vandy. It is a crowded class because it is popular. There may be sharing of resources and working in teams that may actually add to the experience.

Who knows? This may be the class that your child meets a lifelong friend. I am still close friends with people that I shared one class with in high school. And that was during the Lincoln administration.

If the only complaint that you have vandy about the way the administration handled the transition to block scheduling is that some elective classes are crowded, I would say that it is a huge success. Especially given some of the adjectives you have used to describe the administrators in the past. Agreed?
7vens

Hewitt, NJ

#21 Sep 20, 2012
Your kid will be fine vandy. It is a crowded class because it is popular. There may be sharing of resources and collaborative learning that may actually add to the experience.

Who knows? This may be the class where your child meets a lifelong friend. I am still close friends with people that I shared one class with in high school, and that was during the Lincoln administration.

Vandy, if the only complaint that you have about the way the administration handled the transition to block scheduling is that some elective classes are crowded, I would say that it is a huge success. Especially given some of the adjectives you have used to describe the administrators in the past. Agreed?

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