Akron's water supply shrinking

Akron's water supply shrinking

There are 46 comments on the Akron Beacon Journal story from Jul 18, 2007, titled Akron's water supply shrinking. In it, Akron Beacon Journal reports that:

At the city of Akron's East Branch Reservoir in Geauga County, the dominant colors are green and brown.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Akron Beacon Journal.

First Prev
of 3
Next Last

“At least I'm housebroken.”

Since: Jun 07

Canton, OH

#42 Jul 19, 2007
Fo Shizzle wrote:
<quoted text>
Brackish only refers to a sub type of what is generally referred to salt water. Thanks for playing. You are making yourself look rediculous. I think you are just mad that I am right about the smoking ban. Boo hoo.
Go ahead and be dismissive. Most people do that when they know that they are wrong, but aren't mature enough to admit it.

Brackish water is not the same as sea water, which is what people commonly refer to as salt water. Brackish water is fresh and salt water mixed together, and starts at a salinity of 0.5 parts per thousand and goes up to around 35 parts per thousand. The average salinity of the water in our oceans is 36 parts per thousand. So, there is a difference.

Part of the difference is evident by the vast differences in the biology found in fresh, brackish and sea water. The most important brackish water habitats are estuaries, where a river meets the sea. However, The Caspian Sea is the world's largest lake and contains brackish water with a salinity about one-third that of normal sea water.

This isn't something I came up with, but is the standard definition used by scientists. Look up the word "brackish". The Facts of File Dictionary of Marine Science defines brackish water as "water that contains too much salt to be drinkable (potable), but not enough to be seawater. Its average salt content ranges between about 0.5 and 1.7%."

Sorry if the facts don't agree with your world view.

Since: Mar 07

Toledo, OH

#43 Jul 19, 2007
The Big Lebowski wrote:
<quoted text>
Go ahead and be dismissive. Most people do that when they know that they are wrong, but aren't mature enough to admit it.
Brackish water is not the same as sea water, which is what people commonly refer to as salt water. Brackish water is fresh and salt water mixed together, and starts at a salinity of 0.5 parts per thousand and goes up to around 35 parts per thousand. The average salinity of the water in our oceans is 36 parts per thousand. So, there is a difference.
Part of the difference is evident by the vast differences in the biology found in fresh, brackish and sea water. The most important brackish water habitats are estuaries, where a river meets the sea. However, The Caspian Sea is the world's largest lake and contains brackish water with a salinity about one-third that of normal sea water.
This isn't something I came up with, but is the standard definition used by scientists. Look up the word "brackish". The Facts of File Dictionary of Marine Science defines brackish water as "water that contains too much salt to be drinkable (potable), but not enough to be seawater. Its average salt content ranges between about 0.5 and 1.7%."
Sorry if the facts don't agree with your world view.
You do not get it do you. I never said sea water. Can you not read? I said salt water. Salt water is a general term that is defied as any water with more than .5 ppThousand of salt minerals. That includes brackish. Brackish is not freshwater, and cannot be used without desalination processing, which was my original point. You are absolutely correct in your assessment, never said that you were wrong about your use of the finer granularity terms. But I am also correct in using the term salt water. We are just discussing the same topic, I am on a high level you took it one more step and broke down my general term of salt water.

Now, step off.

“At least I'm housebroken.”

Since: Jun 07

Canton, OH

#44 Jul 19, 2007
Fo Shizzle wrote:
<quoted text>
You do not get it do you. I never said sea water. Can you not read? I said salt water. Salt water is a general term that is defied as any water with more than .5 ppThousand of salt minerals. That includes brackish. Brackish is not freshwater, and cannot be used without desalination processing, which was my original point. You are absolutely correct in your assessment, never said that you were wrong about your use of the finer granularity terms. But I am also correct in using the term salt water. We are just discussing the same topic, I am on a high level you took it one more step and broke down my general term of salt water.
Now, step off.
Please provide a definition where brackish water is considered to be salt water. The terms salt water and sea water are used interchangeably. When you say salt water, the average person thinks of the ocean (sea water), not an estuary (brackish water).

“At least I'm housebroken.”

Since: Jun 07

Canton, OH

#45 Jul 19, 2007
Fo Shizzle wrote:
<quoted text>
You do not get it do you. I never said sea water. Can you not read? I said salt water. Salt water is a general term that is defied as any water with more than .5 ppThousand of salt minerals. That includes brackish. Brackish is not freshwater, and cannot be used without desalination processing, which was my original point. You are absolutely correct in your assessment, never said that you were wrong about your use of the finer granularity terms. But I am also correct in using the term salt water. We are just discussing the same topic, I am on a high level you took it one more step and broke down my general term of salt water.
Now, step off.
Before I "step off", please provide us with a definition of salt water that includes brackish water.

Happy hunting!
Ignorance Spotter

Columbus, OH

#46 Jul 19, 2007
Michael Myers of Akron wrote:
I hear that scientists who do not believe in a higher power think that they can make the weather do what they wish by putting certain chemicals in airplane fuel. Myth or not we all have to agree that since the very first cell reproduction clone type experiment these guys believe they are GOD. Well I say let them make it rain and fix this small problem. If they are successful, all I can say is "don't drink the water it's dangerous"
Your post made me laugh. Wasn't controlling the weather a plot of Lex Luther's in the Superman movie series?
Fo Shizzle

United States

#47 Jul 20, 2007
The Big Lebowski wrote:
<quoted text>
Before I "step off", please provide us with a definition of salt water that includes brackish water.
Happy hunting!
You have previously stated that "0.5 to 35 parts per thousand = brackish". This is a fact. I have stated that salt water is water that is more than 0.5 parts per thousand (google define:salt water). Now, mathematically, 0.5 to 35 ppthousand falls in the range greater than 0.5 ppthousand. Thus salt water does include brackish. This is not saying all salt water is brackish, but all brackish water is salt water.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 3
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Middlefield Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Ashley Nicole Welch and Frost Kennels (Sep '16) Sep '16 Rabboni 1
Sewer (Aug '16) Aug '16 Jean Amato 1
Loss of Burton Blog (Sep '13) Sep '15 NotAFan 4
David Filla (Apr '11) Sep '15 OhioMom 2
News Johnson Rubber says it won't close (Feb '08) Apr '15 Wentworth 26
News Norbalt Rubber's parent bankrupt, seeking buyer (Apr '08) Feb '15 cashin in 3
News Johnson Rubber to go out of business (Mar '08) Jan '14 mismanaged 9

Middlefield Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Middlefield Mortgages