Appetite for organic food wilts as ec...

Appetite for organic food wilts as economy suffers

There are 42 comments on the TwinCities.com story from Dec 10, 2008, titled Appetite for organic food wilts as economy suffers. In it, TwinCities.com reports that:

The rotten economy is eating into sales of organic foods as fewer Americans put these often costly groceries on their plates.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at TwinCities.com.

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Ironic

Minneapolis, MN

#1 Dec 10, 2008
I find it ironic that on the same day that this article is posted, the World Health Organization announces "Cancer to be world's top killer by 2010."

Processed, chemical, dye and pesticide laden foods, are the reason that Cancer is now the #1 killer in 2010. This is one thing we should NOT be cutting back on!
Karen

Rochester, MN

#2 Dec 10, 2008
I think organic is a big waste of money. Just because the name says organic doesn't make that fruit or vegetable any better for you. I refuse to buy into the game and purchase organics.

“I'm not crying... Winning!”

Since: Oct 08

Twin Cities, USA

#3 Dec 10, 2008
I agree with Karen. It just seems like such a scam.
Joe

Winsted, MN

#4 Dec 10, 2008
The debate over whether organic food is healthier than conventionally grown food may be over, according to results from a $25-million study into organic food -- the largest of its kind to date.

The four-year, European-Union-funded study found that:

* Organic fruit and vegetables contain up to 40 percent more antioxidants

* Organic produce had higher levels of beneficial minerals like iron and zinc

* Milk from organic herds contained up to 90 percent more antioxidants

The researchers obtained their results after growing fruit and vegetables, and raising cattle, on adjacent organic and non-organic sites. They say that eating organic foods can even help to increase the nutrient intake of people who don’t eat the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.
Reg and the PFJ

Plymouth, MN

#5 Dec 10, 2008
"Thirty-Six percent of organic purchasers report household incomes over $100K?" Well, obviously this stuff is considered a luxury, to be reserved only for the top 5%-ers. When are we going to see some windfall taxes imposed on "Big Organic?"

Since: Apr 08

Minneapolis, MN

#6 Dec 10, 2008
Organic milk at 8 bucks a gallon, don't think so.

Organic eggs 4 dollars a dozen, don't think so.

I never bought into that, just another agenda by the wacky left and in some place subsidized with our tax dollar in some places.
herbie

United States

#7 Dec 10, 2008
"subsidized with our tax dollar"

think you are confusing that with GMOs(Genetically Modified Orgamisms...yummy thanks Monsanto). Eating organic is the only way to insure that you and your family aren't unwilling test subjects. Yea...NOT using pesticede and supporting local farms is "wacky left" conspiricy. Also you can grow your own and buy in bulk(my favorite part of natural food stores)to save $$$...it's not rocket science YO. Also the title is misleading..."appetite for organic wilts" event though it's still growing by 16% per year...lol. which is better than they ever thought it would!
Organic

Minneapolis, MN

#8 Dec 10, 2008
I think Kevin Trudeau nailed it on the head in his book when he gave the following illustration:

A friend of his couldn't understand why Kevin spent extra money on organics. So Kevin took out one of his organic apples out of the refrigerator and sprayed it with Raid. He gave it to him and said "here, this is what you get when you are buying fruits that are sprayed with pesticides", and the friend said "I wouldn't eat it like that".
So Kevin took the apple and ran it under water and said "ok, then here eat it now".

The friend got the point.

Since: Aug 08

Saint Paul, MN

#9 Dec 10, 2008
What on this God Given Earth happened when we didn't have all the organic this and that. Too much worry will be the #1 killer before the government gets their crap together.

Tell your doctor like I do when they ask what you eat. I say "what I can afford to eat."

“We're all connected”

Since: Feb 08

St Paul, MN

#10 Dec 10, 2008
Joe wrote:
The debate over whether organic food is healthier than conventionally grown food may be over, according to results from a $25-million study into organic food -- the largest of its kind to date.
The four-year, European-Union-funded study found that:
* Organic fruit and vegetables contain up to 40 percent more antioxidants
* Organic produce had higher levels of beneficial minerals like iron and zinc
* Milk from organic herds contained up to 90 percent more antioxidants
The researchers obtained their results after growing fruit and vegetables, and raising cattle, on adjacent organic and non-organic sites. They say that eating organic foods can even help to increase the nutrient intake of people who don’t eat the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.
Proof is in the (organic) pudding.

I don't know why anyone puts down organic food. It's a choice-as far as I've ever figured out, no one forces another person to buy organic.

I'm acutely aware that what I eat and how I feel is connected. I make limited organic food purchases, mostly with fruits, veggies and milk. My choice.

“We're all connected”

Since: Feb 08

St Paul, MN

#11 Dec 10, 2008
Organic wrote:
I think Kevin Trudeau nailed it on the head in his book when he gave the following illustration:
A friend of his couldn't understand why Kevin spent extra money on organics. So Kevin took out one of his organic apples out of the refrigerator and sprayed it with Raid. He gave it to him and said "here, this is what you get when you are buying fruits that are sprayed with pesticides", and the friend said "I wouldn't eat it like that".
So Kevin took the apple and ran it under water and said "ok, then here eat it now".
The friend got the point.
Ironically, much of the food pre-1940 was probably organic (free of pesticides, anyway). Funny how what we used to do is what many people want to do again, in terms of health, anyway.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pesticides
family farm

United States

#12 Dec 10, 2008
I agree with ironic

Support your local Family Farms (big organic wat?). Keeps more money in the local area. I'm not as concerned about buying organic as i am buying local as much as possible(which is usually organic).
Organic Agenda, eh? No pesticides on your food!! Riiiiight...What could be worse?
now go back to sh/leep...you have nothing to worry about, everyting will be just fine

“We're all connected”

Since: Feb 08

St Paul, MN

#13 Dec 10, 2008
family farm wrote:
I agree with ironic
Support your local Family Farms (big organic wat?). Keeps more money in the local area. I'm not as concerned about buying organic as i am buying local as much as possible(which is usually organic).
Organic Agenda, eh? No pesticides on your food!! Riiiiight...What could be worse?
now go back to sh/leep...you have nothing to worry about, everyting will be just fine
I try both at the farmer's market, downtown St Paul (still open, year 'round!!)

Supporting local has been my biggest change, since selling my car. I've really enjoyed the farmer's market experience.

I don't think it's exactly right for you to insinuate what you do about those who prefer organic. Some do it because they cannot tolerate pesticides or added chemicals. Some do it because they have kids. Some probably do it because they own stock in organics. But whatever the reason, it's their reason.
hdog

United States

#14 Dec 10, 2008
Karen wrote:
I think organic is a big waste of money. Just because the name says organic doesn't make that fruit or vegetable any better for you. I refuse to buy into the game and purchase organics.
Yeah, at one time it had some merit, but now I think it really is a money-making scam that feeds (sorry) off health fears. What they charge for some of this stuff is a joke. They deserve to take a hit.
hdog

United States

#15 Dec 10, 2008
Mellers wrote:
<quoted text>
Proof is in the (organic) pudding.
I don't know why anyone puts down organic food. It's a choice-as far as I've ever figured out, no one forces another person to buy organic.
I'm acutely aware that what I eat and how I feel is connected. I make limited organic food purchases, mostly with fruits, veggies and milk. My choice.
Not really putting down organic food itself, mind you, I just think that some of the markets have gotten carried away. At least the ones I've gone to are no longer the humble little 'ma and pa' deals, and they charge a fortune.

“We're all connected”

Since: Feb 08

St Paul, MN

#16 Dec 10, 2008
Ironic wrote:
I find it ironic that on the same day that this article is posted, the World Health Organization announces "Cancer to be world's top killer by 2010."
Processed, chemical, dye and pesticide laden foods, are the reason that Cancer is now the #1 killer in 2010. This is one thing we should NOT be cutting back on!
As I keep reading posts from the "organic food is a hoax" posters, your words keep echoing back to me. We ARE what we eat and cannot deny it. Of course, food isn't the only issue, but it is a direct connection between our environment and out bodies.
hmmm

Saint Paul, MN

#17 Dec 10, 2008
Grow your own - cheap AND organic.

Organic eggs straight from the farmer are worth every penny of that 4 bucks. They taste 100 times better than conventional eggs that have been sitting in a carton for a month or more.
Diane

Marquette, MI

#18 Dec 10, 2008
Overall, I find it less expensive to eat organic.

It has changed my appetite to where I prefer healthful food. I don't even want the junk food or fast food anymore. Which saves me a lot of money!

I shop the farmer's markets, local farms, farm shared. Often cheaper than the conventional grocery store.

Bulk foods section at a good co-op is inexpensive too.

I care more about knowing who grows my food (neighboring farms) and touring their farm to learn about their practices.

A great book for getting excited about local and sustainable food sources: Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver.

50 years ago the foods we ate were as nature intended, not engineered to withstand shipping, which took a lot of the flavor out of them.

Eating locally grown means less fuel costs attached to my food, too.

Eating locally raised meats, that eat what the animal was intended to eat - oh my gosh - that stuff tastes like meat used to taste when I was a kid!

I don't go for buying something just because it is labeled organic - that doesn't mean much.

But I do shop at a co-op where we owners investigate every vendor from whom we buy our food, and we know their growing practices, etc.

But don't believe those posting here - do some reading about both sides of the story - and then decide.

What we hear about food and what is the truth about food are often two very different things!
doomster

Saint Paul, MN

#19 Dec 10, 2008
Diane wrote:
Overall, I find it less expensive to eat organic.
It has changed my appetite to where I prefer healthful food. I don't even want the junk food or fast food anymore. Which saves me a lot of money!
I shop the farmer's markets, local farms, farm shared. Often cheaper than the conventional grocery store.
Bulk foods section at a good co-op is inexpensive too.
I care more about knowing who grows my food (neighboring farms) and touring their farm to learn about their practices.
A great book for getting excited about local and sustainable food sources: Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver.
50 years ago the foods we ate were as nature intended, not engineered to withstand shipping, which took a lot of the flavor out of them.
Eating locally grown means less fuel costs attached to my food, too.
Eating locally raised meats, that eat what the animal was intended to eat - oh my gosh - that stuff tastes like meat used to taste when I was a kid!
I don't go for buying something just because it is labeled organic - that doesn't mean much.
But I do shop at a co-op where we owners investigate every vendor from whom we buy our food, and we know their growing practices, etc.
But don't believe those posting here - do some reading about both sides of the story - and then decide.
What we hear about food and what is the truth about food are often two very different things!
You have way too much time on your hands. Do you want to live to be 100 yrs. old? I've been to nursing homes enough to know a few Big Macs will get me out of here at about 80yrs - just before the big decline usually starts. You'll be slurping up your meal through a straw at 101 years and I'll be resting in peace.
Alt

Cannon Falls, MN

#20 Dec 10, 2008
This is awful now all these financly well off people will be buying the only food I can afford and with the old supply and demand principal my cost for food will go up even more,I can't afford to pay more.

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