Renovations at Crawford Villa

Renovations at Crawford Villa

Posted in the McKeesport Forum

Per Tube City Almanac

Mckeesport, PA

#1 Jul 16, 2013
The Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency will offer tax credits to developers who are building replacements for housing in the city's Crawford Village area, as well as in Duquesne, state Sen. Jim Brewster announced today.

The 5.5-acre "Yester Square" development in McKeesport will replace existing buildings with 10 new two-story apartment buildings providing 58 housing units. Brewster said it's the first phase of the McKeesport Housing Authority's plan to revitalize what he called "poor conditions" and high population density at Crawford Village, located in the East End near the McKeesport-Duquesne Bridge.

>>>Read the entire article here http://www.tubecityonline.com/almanac/entry_2...
ghetto complex

West Mifflin, PA

#2 Jul 16, 2013
how many crack babies will be born in this 'new' housing complex? how many drug deals will go down?
how many shootings will take place?
should have a lottery to boost the economy..
I dont care

Pittsburgh, PA

#3 Jul 17, 2013
The best renovation woul be to rip it all down !
yep

Pittsburgh, PA

#4 Jul 18, 2013
I dont care wrote:
The best renovation woul be to rip it all down !
Exactly.

Instead of spending money to keep the welfare cycle going, spend that money to build REAL assets for the city instead.
Conflict of Interest

Mckeesport, PA

#5 Jul 18, 2013
Per Tube City Almanac wrote:
The Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency will offer tax credits to developers who are building replacements for housing in the city's Crawford Village area, as well as in Duquesne, state Sen. Jim Brewster announced today.
The 5.5-acre "Yester Square" development in McKeesport will replace existing buildings with 10 new two-story apartment buildings providing 58 housing units. Brewster said it's the first phase of the McKeesport Housing Authority's plan to revitalize what he called "poor conditions" and high population density at Crawford Village, located in the East End near the McKeesport-Duquesne Bridge.
>>>Read the entire article here http://www.tubecityonline.com/almanac/entry_2...
Would it be a conflict of interest for an elected official to assist in funding a project and then being its chairman? Nepotism and political friends and contractors get the jobs. The contractors that will build the village will contribute to the chairman. Seems like the TPC model to me and those guys are going to trial.

Where are you Feds and AG Kathy Kane? This guy must be an untouchable made of Teflon.
Hobo Jim

Mckeesport, PA

#6 Jul 19, 2013
Here we go again with more government waste! I will move from Palkowitz Estates for one of these homes.

New Detroit-Area Homes Demolished as Housing Project Goes Awry
The Detroit area remains one of the top 10 metros for foreclosed and vacated homes. Its abandoned residences often become hideouts for drug users and prostitutes, and occasionally scenes of murder. So it's no wonder that government officials want to simply tear down many of these homes. But in the community of Highland Park, Mich., several of the homes recently demolished were nearly new and never owned after a neighborhood revitalization project turned disastrous. And even the wreckers hired to do the job expressed shock at the waste.

"The project was supposed to transform a derelict section of Highland Park into a model neighborhood," reported Detroit TV station WXYZ. "But a lot of the homes built just eight years ago are now abandoned, stripped, burned and now being demolished by the state as a part of its "Michigan Blight Elimination Program."
Just recently, several homes built this decade were marked for demolition alongside some 60-year-old homes.(See the demolition slideshow below.) "Four houses over, there were abandoned homes more than 30 years old, but they had me come take out a new one," Bill Koresky, the owner of Able Demolition hired to raze the homes, told AOL Real Estate. "I called the inspector. I said 'There is no way I can rip these down. There are new doors, new windows. The interior has not even been painted yet.' "
But Koresky says the inspector confirmed that the homes had to come down by order of the state. Not because of mold. Not because of bad soil. Not because of chemical contamination. But, according to news reports, because of alleged mismanagement of funds and poor planning. It turned out that not many people wanted to spend $150,000 on a 1,100-square-foot home in a distressed community. Then at least one of the financiers behind the project in Highland Park -- an incorporated city essentially surrounded by Detroit -- was charged with conspiracy and money laundering in connection with real estate deals in Ohio. And the state official running HIghland Park's financial affairs also ran into legal trouble.
After the 2005 ground-breaking for the new properties in Highland Park - a city that was forced to follow the financial supervision of the state since 1990 -- its emergency financial manager was replaced by Art Blackwell, who's now on probation after pleading guilty to mismanaging funds while serving as the emergency manager. In addition, the construction of the new units were being privately financed by Aryeh Schottenstein of Oak Park, Mich., who was accused of running a house-flipping and money-laundering scheme in Columbus, Ohio, at the same time that he was supposed to be financing the Highland Park project. He pleaded guilty, and in 2009 Schottenstein was sentenced to 42 months in prison and ordered to pay $3,740,173 in restitution to the victim financial institutions.

As if all that wasn't enough, WXYZ reported that the properties in the project that were bought and occupied were found by owners to be poorly constructed and subject to flooding. And the recent recession probably didn't help either.
So the lesson is, just because you build it, that doesn't mean buyers will come, or that money from the state and others will continue to flow. But there was enough money for the tear-down. The demolition of 24 homes in Highland Park was being paid for by a $13.8-million grant through the federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program, with three-quarters of the money being used to level vacant, dilapidated structures along several streets in the vicinity, reported The Detroit Free Press.

"Essentially, you and I are paying for the demolition with taxes," said Koresky in his phone interview with AOL Real Estate. "Parts of the homes at least could have been donated. Given to Habitat for Humanity. Big money was just being thrown away."
Hobo Jim

Mckeesport, PA

#7 Jul 19, 2013
New Detroit-Area Homes Demolished as Housing Project Goes Awry

The Detroit area remains one of the top 10 metros for foreclosed and vacated homes. Its abandoned residences often become hideouts for drug users and prostitutes, and occasionally scenes of murder. So it's no wonder that government officials want to simply tear down many of these homes. But in the community of Highland Park, Mich., several of the homes recently demolished were nearly new and never owned after a neighborhood revitalization project turned disastrous. And even the wreckers hired to do the job expressed shock at the waste.

"The project was supposed to transform a derelict section of Highland Park into a model neighborhood," reported Detroit TV station WXYZ. "But a lot of the homes built just eight years ago are now abandoned, stripped, burned and now being demolished by the state as a part of its "Michigan Blight Elimination Program."

Just recently, several homes built this decade were marked for demolition alongside some 60-year-old homes.(See the demolition slideshow below.) "Four houses over, there were abandoned homes more than 30 years old, but they had me come take out a new one," Bill Koresky, the owner of Able Demolition hired to raze the homes, told AOL Real Estate. "I called the inspector. I said 'There is no way I can rip these down. There are new doors, new windows. The interior has not even been painted yet.' "

But Koresky says the inspector confirmed that the homes had to come down by order of the state. Not because of mold. Not because of bad soil. Not because of chemical contamination. But, according to news reports, because of alleged mismanagement of funds and poor planning. It turned out that not many people wanted to spend $150,000 on a 1,100-square-foot home in a distressed community. Then at least one of the financiers behind the project in Highland Park -- an incorporated city essentially surrounded by Detroit -- was charged with conspiracy and money laundering in connection with real estate deals in Ohio. And the state official running HIghland Park's financial affairs also ran into legal trouble.

After the 2005 ground-breaking for the new properties in Highland Park -- a city that was forced to follow the financial supervision of the state since 1990 -- its emergency financial manager was replaced by Art Blackwell, who's now on probation after pleading guilty to mismanaging funds while serving as the emergency manager. In addition, the construction of the new units were being privately financed by Aryeh Schottenstein of Oak Park, Mich., who was accused of running a house-flipping and money-laundering scheme in Columbus, Ohio, at the same time that he was supposed to be financing the Highland Park project. He pleaded guilty, and in 2009 Schottenstein was sentenced to 42 months in prison and ordered to pay $3,740,173 in restitution to the victim financial institutions.

As if all that wasn't enough, WXYZ reported that the properties in the project that were bought and occupied were found by owners to be poorly constructed and subject to flooding. And the recent recession probably didn't help either.

So the lesson is, just because you build it, that doesn't mean buyers will come, or that money from the state and others will continue to flow. But there was enough money for the tear-down. The demolition of 24 homes in Highland Park was being paid for by a $13.8-million grant through the federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program, with three-quarters of the money being used to level vacant, dilapidated structures along several streets in the vicinity, reported The Detroit Free Press.

"Essentially, you and I are paying for the demolition with taxes," said Koresky in his phone interview with AOL Real Estate. "Parts of the homes at least could have been donated. Given to Habitat for Humanity. Big money was just being thrown away."

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