Drug Task Force
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PNTF

Richmond, KY

#1 Apr 9, 2009
There seems to be a lot of discussions regarding law enforcements on these forums. Due to the anonymous format, I felt this would be a perfect opportunity to discuss any drug problems or law enforcment issues with the Pennyrile Narcotics Task Force. I am a Detective with the aforementioned agency. We usually aren't afforded the opportunity to get out with the people and discuss things or answer questions.

So, I am "opening the door." Please talk to us about a multitude of topics. I will check this particular forum and answer any questions you might have regarding drug identification, current trends, side effects, indications of drug use, our policies, resources, or just about anything else. Feel free to inform us of anything we might need or want to know. You can even give a anonymous tip if you would like to. I don't even mind hearing complaints, which after reading severl posts, I am fully expecting. If I receive a complaint, I will investigate it and forward it to our Director and will carbon copy the response on this forum.

So, if you have any concerns at all. Please feel free. Just please be advised, I will not discuss any on-going information regarding current cases. I also will not confirm or deny any on-going investigation. Looking forward to the questions!
My 2 Sense

Port Orange, FL

#2 Apr 10, 2009
I'm curious about something..I have often wondered why you all go after "the small fish" to fry instead of the bigger ones.

Prisons are full of drug addicts trying to do a deal to support their own habit instead of them being full of the big fish.

I'm curious as to what it takes to get to the big dealer..

Mayfield in particular has had the same heavy hitters over the past 15 years but I have never heard of their arrests.

What's the point in locking up the minnow when it is clearly the 10 lb. bass you need to get?
My 2 Sense

Port Orange, FL

#3 Apr 10, 2009
1 other question..

Why don't you work to enforce very strict laws against farmers and companies that use that stuff they put in Meth? It seems to that if there were some strict laws against the people who use this stuff "legally", it wouldn't be so easy to get to to create these labs.

Fine the people/companies that store this stuff like $10,000 if it gets stolen. I can promise you, it wouldn't be so easy for the average street scientist to get to.
knowing

Denton, TX

#4 Apr 10, 2009
Dustin Farmer
PNTF

Richmond, KY

#5 Apr 10, 2009
My 2 Sense wrote:
I'm curious about something..I have often wondered why you all go after "the small fish" to fry instead of the bigger ones.
Prisons are full of drug addicts trying to do a deal to support their own habit instead of them being full of the big fish.
I'm curious as to what it takes to get to the big dealer..
Mayfield in particular has had the same heavy hitters over the past 15 years but I have never heard of their arrests.
What's the point in locking up the minnow when it is clearly the 10 lb. bass you need to get?
Great question. There is a misconception there that only the addicts are arrested. We TARGET traffickers. That is our function. We have done so since our begining. With that in mind, we don't ignore the users either. Both are volating state and federal law and we aggressively enforce those law. I can address a couple of things within that question. Working in narcotics is primarily covert work. Meaning, the less people know about what we are doing, the better we can do our jobs. With that in mind, a majority of our cases from start to finish are never brought to the media's attention. We are not politically affiliated. So the less media exposure we get, the more we can get accomplished. If you are familar with Mayfield, you can probably think of several "high level" dealers that all of a sudden disappeared. That is usually because they have been proscuted in the federal court as opposed to the state court.

Yes, we TARGET dealers, but don't ignore users either. We also tend to get users help through long term treatment.

One more thing, I am not interested in WHY someone is selling drugs. Some do so to support their habit and some do so for financial gain. Their reasons for doing it isn't that much of a concern. They are facilitating narcotics trafficking. You are either the problem or a part of the solution. That is their choice. They are selling drugs. We will actively and aggressivly pursue them. I am sure it is frustrating sometimes, because the general public sees drug dealers on the street corners selling dope and think the police aren't paying attention. What they don't know is that we are a couple of blocks away, hidden, watching and taping, and building our case. I hope that helps.
PNTF

Richmond, KY

#6 Apr 10, 2009
My 2 Sense wrote:
1 other question..
Why don't you work to enforce very strict laws against farmers and companies that use that stuff they put in Meth? It seems to that if there were some strict laws against the people who use this stuff "legally", it wouldn't be so easy to get to to create these labs.
Fine the people/companies that store this stuff like $10,000 if it gets stolen. I can promise you, it wouldn't be so easy for the average street scientist to get to.
I assume that you are refering to anhydrous ammonia or "annie." Annie is a widely used fertilizer that is a normal part of farming. It is incredibly useful for farmers. In the commonwealth of kentucky there are laws prohibiting the storage of large tanks within enclosures due to safety hazards i.e. exposive, and vapors. So the farmers and stores are very limited to where they can store them. There are laws being placed in effect to help combat those thefts and in my opinion, that is the appropriate measure to take.

TO give you an example: oxycodone or oxycontin is a miracle drug. Normally prescribed to terminal cancer patients or patiens whom are in terrible pain. I am sure you are aware that people abuse this drug. Most aren't patients that need the drugs, they are just addicts trying to get their "fix." So should we make this miracle drug illegal and punish good people who are in pain, or should we crack down on it from another avenue? Those are the questions that our congressmen decide.

I really appreciate the questions and I hope you have more. I have been asked these questions before and I think the key to cleaning up a community is teamwork and education. I hope I helped.
In the know

Frankfort, KY

#7 Apr 10, 2009
My 2 Sense wrote:
1 other question..
Why don't you work to enforce very strict laws against farmers and companies that use that stuff they put in Meth? It seems to that if there were some strict laws against the people who use this stuff "legally", it wouldn't be so easy to get to to create these labs.
Fine the people/companies that store this stuff like $10,000 if it gets stolen. I can promise you, it wouldn't be so easy for the average street scientist to get to.
I'd like to comment on this one. It is true that many people carelessly leave their tanks in the field or at least in a place that is not under constant watch. However, you'd be surprised the lengths that some of the major storage facilities go to, to secure their huge tanks. Despite their best efforts, the addicts take their lives into their own hands, and those of others by "cracking" the storage tanks, taking what they need and then leaving them to leak.

Some farmers will secure the tanks in barns with all the doors locked, and the criminals will rip off the metal walls to get into the tanks. Its alot like protecting the sudafed, meth makers are going to get their supplies one way or another, the best we can do is try to make it as hard as we can to stop them. But no effort is fool proof. The addiction is stronger than any effort we can take.
cuba cubs

United States

#8 Apr 10, 2009
sounds like you guys are on the right track keep it up. i have 2 little ones i would much rather see them educated.
My 2 Sense

Richmond, KY

#9 Apr 10, 2009
PNTF wrote:
<quoted text>
I assume that you are refering to anhydrous ammonia or "annie." Annie is a widely used fertilizer that is a normal part of farming. It is incredibly useful for farmers. In the commonwealth of kentucky there are laws prohibiting the storage of large tanks within enclosures due to safety hazards i.e. exposive, and vapors. So the farmers and stores are very limited to where they can store them. There are laws being placed in effect to help combat those thefts and in my opinion, that is the appropriate measure to take.
TO give you an example: oxycodone or oxycontin is a miracle drug. Normally prescribed to terminal cancer patients or patiens whom are in terrible pain. I am sure you are aware that people abuse this drug. Most aren't patients that need the drugs, they are just addicts trying to get their "fix." So should we make this miracle drug illegal and punish good people who are in pain, or should we crack down on it from another avenue? Those are the questions that our congressmen decide.
I really appreciate the questions and I hope you have more. I have been asked these questions before and I think the key to cleaning up a community is teamwork and education. I hope I helped.
Thanks..both answered nicely.
My 2 Sense

Richmond, KY

#10 Apr 10, 2009
In the know wrote:
<quoted text>
I'd like to comment on this one. It is true that many people carelessly leave their tanks in the field or at least in a place that is not under constant watch. However, you'd be surprised the lengths that some of the major storage facilities go to, to secure their huge tanks. Despite their best efforts, the addicts take their lives into their own hands, and those of others by "cracking" the storage tanks, taking what they need and then leaving them to leak.
Some farmers will secure the tanks in barns with all the doors locked, and the criminals will rip off the metal walls to get into the tanks. Its alot like protecting the sudafed, meth makers are going to get their supplies one way or another, the best we can do is try to make it as hard as we can to stop them. But no effort is fool proof. The addiction is stronger than any effort we can take.
I thought over the years I've seen it all in all forms of addiction. I've never seen anything like what Meth does to someone. It was bad enough to see someone who you hadn't seen in a long time who got addicted to crack. They look terrible. They've lost teeth. They've lost everything but omg to look at how Meth affects someone in such a short time, is amazing.

Just got a thought...these people I spoke of didn't lose anything, they gave in to the drug and then gave up. So, I guess they gave away everything because of their addiction.
PNTF

Richmond, KY

#11 Apr 10, 2009
"In the Know" thank you for that comment. So many farmers go out of their way to help us in combating anny thefts and it is always appreciated. I don't think I have ever responded to a hit tank, no matter its location, that they didn't leave leaking.
stop it cold

Murray, KY

#12 Apr 10, 2009
you should spend some time in Wingo. A lot of traffic there.
PNTF

Port Orange, FL

#13 Apr 11, 2009
stop it cold wrote:
you should spend some time in Wingo. A lot of traffic there.


Are there any particular places in Wingo, i.e. apartment complex, streets, back roads, or blocks?
Also, is their a certain time that you see more traffic?
tidbit

Bethel, PA

#14 Apr 11, 2009
you should look at some of the law enforcement officals who "look the other way" when their palms are greased... i know of one who actualy introduced a young girl to the trade guaranteeing her she would never need for money again - and according to her he was right - but she realized and got clean now he is hellbent on punishing her for it using various court systems including pointing the finger at her for drug use & dealing when he was the one who took her into "Little Mexico" and hooked her up...
PNTF

Port Orange, FL

#15 Apr 11, 2009
"tidbit" I need a little more information regarding your last post. If you feel uncomfortable posting more than what you already have. You can email me at [email protected]

Again, I will keep you posted on the status of the investigation. Thank you for that post.
greg

Mayfield, KY

#16 Apr 12, 2009
paying off snitches is bad practice.
greg

Mayfield, KY

#17 Apr 12, 2009
stop it cold wrote:
you should spend some time in Wingo. A lot of traffic there.
you aint kiddin the mart in wingo had the "i love you roses" (aka crack pipes) and the chore boy right together on the front counter. i was sickened by it.how can they get by with that crap.its not right.meth and crack are killing people and they always tend to go after pot. i just dont get it.
i kinda retract my previous statement,i know you have to have informants but when you use drug addicts as informants,it just dont work.we all want meth and crack GONE tho,thats for sure.
make them all go to mandatory rehab,jail wont work they will just use again when they get out,or find it in the can.crack and meth both are nothing but death wishes.
My 2 Sense

Richmond, KY

#18 Apr 12, 2009
greg wrote:
<quoted text>
you aint kiddin the mart in wingo had the "i love you roses" (aka crack pipes) and the chore boy right together on the front counter. i was sickened by it.how can they get by with that crap.its not right.meth and crack are killing people and they always tend to go after pot. i just dont get it.
i kinda retract my previous statement,i know you have to have informants but when you use drug addicts as informants,it just dont work.we all want meth and crack GONE tho,thats for sure.
make them all go to mandatory rehab,jail wont work they will just use again when they get out,or find it in the can.crack and meth both are nothing but death wishes.
Mandatory rehab doesn't work either. They're forced into getting clean. They have to want it for it to work.
PNTF

United States

#19 Apr 12, 2009
Once again, I am glad we created this forum to get people to think as a community. The problem is way more complicated than the average citizen believes. As a community, everyone shold come together and not tolerate this behaiviour. It is YOUR community isn't it? Let's take it back!

Let me address another misconception. No we don't ONLY prosecute marijuana offenders. We prosecute any illegal substanct being sold in our streets, It is similar to my earlier post....we don't target marijuana users, but we don't ignore them either.

Informants are the way of the world. Unfortunately they are a necessity in today's time, but they are nothing alone. They combined with surviellance and good old fashion police work gets things done and they are don correctly.

I agree. For a rehab to be truly successful it must come from inside the addict. I can't be forced upon or thrust on. They have to really WANT to become clean. They are the ones who make themselves clean! The great news is that there are plenty more out there!

As an enforcer, I don't shy away from an addict. I take them to get help. If help means being charged and speding some time in jail....then yes, that's what it means. Sometimes you have to wake them up.

Thanks for listening and great comments. Please keep them coming!
Tim

Bossier City, LA

#20 Apr 14, 2009
Why not post this in the river counties.

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