Struggling to succeed

Struggling to succeed

There are 41 comments on the Honolulu Star-Bulletin story from Aug 3, 2008, titled Struggling to succeed. In it, Honolulu Star-Bulletin reports that:

A record number of Hawaii public schools are being restructured after failing to meet goals under the No Child Left Behind law.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Honolulu Star-Bulletin.

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kahaluu

Kaneohe, HI

#1 Aug 3, 2008
schools need the resources and talent to be able to reach the goals. you can't just raise the goals without support. the governor can release funds already she already cut.
David

San Antonio, TX

#2 Aug 3, 2008
The problems Hawaii has had with keeping up w/ Federal Standards do not surprise me. Low expectations, parental involvement, and cutting early education programs have all contributed to the results. The solution is to pay more, expect more, and hold children accoutable for their scores.
khi

Ewa Beach, HI

#4 Aug 3, 2008
When you don't really want to deal with a problem "restructuring" makes it look like your doing something. Here's the BOE rearranging the deck chairs. Has it ever occurred to you that a failing education system is what is wanted? It's not like there's a lot of challenging jobs for well trained graduates. The "culture" of the public education system began with the planter's control that was designed to create docile, and dim, graduates. Better off they not be so well educated. A well educated workforce would be trouble for the Big 5. Less frustration once you get out if you don't know so much. It started in 1893....
Notsosure

Honolulu, HI

#5 Aug 3, 2008
I agree with Mr. Hamada's assertion that: "...that a large portion of restructuring schools won't require too much intervention because they missed goals by just one or two student groups or separate requirements." It makes you wonder who really makes the decision(s) as to why a school, as described above, needs a costly, full reform model. Is it because there is a lot of money going into someone's pocket that is really driving this decision? Or is it possible that the DOE leadership is not all on the same page when it comes to knowing what the schools really need? Or is it all of the above? I'm Notsosure.
Tom

AOL

#6 Aug 3, 2008
A suggestion for the Hawaii schools system is to consider hiring some tough and demanding inner city school teachers and administrators from the main land. In addition the district needs to review who the human resource personnel are,how they were selected, and just what they are doing to bring in staff that will be a part of the solution and not a part of the problem. There is alway a possibilty of nepotism and cronyism in the hiring practices and that should be carefully exaimed as well.
IXTLAN

Kaneohe, HI

#7 Aug 3, 2008
the article never tells us what restructuring means. what happens, to who?
Brown man

Kaneohe, HI

#8 Aug 3, 2008
You have to have a strong administrator to help you pass the No Child Left Behind Act. If the school fails then the administrator should be replaced.
SBReader

Manassas, VA

#9 Aug 3, 2008
The Washington, D. C. schools were in a horrible rut. The district had a lot of financial resources put into it but the results were consistently abysmal. The city government fired the old administrator and brought in Michelle Rhee who is very innovative and instituted several programs that are out of the norm. The DC school district test results showed improvement last year and indications are progress is being made. Hawaii should study what DC did.
Okole Maluna

AOL

#10 Aug 3, 2008
Save our children!!!!!!!!
hpw19b

Kailua, HI

#11 Aug 3, 2008
"large portion of restructuring schools...missed goals by just one or two student groups or separate requirements."

Where can I see the entire list of schools which area they missed, and by how far? Each school should provide the complete details (handout or reference) to all parents, and explained what they did.
Bob_Mililani

San Diego, CA

#12 Aug 3, 2008
In some respects, it seems as though the DOE could be more proactive than reactive. It's essential that all within the system be held accountable to do their jobs well, and throwing more money into pay increases won't make mediocre teachers and administrators any better. Most importantly, parents need to get involved and provide their support. Teaching their kids discipline, respect, morals, values, etc., along with follow-up and consistency will go a long way to help.
Parent

Honolulu, HI

#13 Aug 3, 2008
Brown man wrote:
You have to have a strong administrator to help you pass the No Child Left Behind Act. If the school fails then the administrator should be replaced.
I agree. Strong leadership is hard to find.
CAUGHT

San Diego, CA

#14 Aug 3, 2008
darn the bar was set so low for since this began and cant even reach that!

NOT GOOD
CAUGHT

San Diego, CA

#15 Aug 3, 2008
Bob_Mililani wrote:
In some respects, it seems as though the DOE could be more proactive than reactive. It's essential that all within the system be held accountable to do their jobs well, and throwing more money into pay increases won't make mediocre teachers and administrators any better. Most importantly, parents need to get involved and provide their support. Teaching their kids discipline, respect, morals, values, etc., along with follow-up and consistency will go a long way to help.
Thats the key ACCOUNTABILITY........with out that you get nothing.

How do you think businesses build their companies!
Who Cares

San Francisco, CA

#16 Aug 3, 2008
Why the push for "education".

Who cares?

Hawaii's industries are;

1) Hotels and tourism
2) Government
3) Contruction/Labor

How many college grads live in Hawaii doing menial jobs that really don't require a college education.

If everyone in Hawaii tomorrow had a college educaiton, would that make things better?

I doubt it. In fact it would be worse because you'ld have 1 million very frustrated workers.

Early education in Hawaii is for socialization. Kids should be allowed to leave at 10th grade to attend specific vocational high schools.

alice

Honolulu, HI

#17 Aug 3, 2008
no Hon. Early education stresses intense intellectual, emotional. cognitive and social development. It is critical to strengthening our k-12 schools. Hawaii needs to go bio-tech and hihg-tech to diversify its farming and unskilled labor sectors.
Environaut

Hilo, HI

#18 Aug 3, 2008
The list of schools in the various stages of restructuring is available on the DOE website. There are several levels that a school must meet before it gets to that stage.

If you know the school's location, you can generally guess where the school stands in the ranking: The higher the community's income and educational level, the more likely it is to be making Adequate Yearly Progress.

The problem most schools have - except in the poorest communities - is stated above: Most students meet or exceed the goals except for special needs students who are expected to pass the same set of exams.

Are we arguing that they should be forgotten by the public school system? Of course not - what they need is special education to meet their needs, not Congress's expectations.

If we turly believe in educating all of our children, then the law needs to be changed and it needs federal $$$.

However, if we do not want to invest the money in the future through universal education, then we need to set up a multi-tier educational system which tracks students into different types of educational programs by age 10.

This is how many other countries handle the situation. Unfortunately, most of those countries do not invest in adult education, however, so that once childen are put into a general education program and become a bus driver or a mechanic or housecleaner around age 18, that's pretty much where they will stay for the rest of their working lives.

What skills do today's 10-year-olds need to become workers in 2020? How will we handle mentally challenged kids or ones with severe physical difficulties or ones trying to learn a new language?

We need more than snarky comments from the public to resolve these problems.

BTW - when was the last time you volunteered at a nearby school? I have a good friend who works at a nearby elementary school in a decent middle-class neighborhood. Fewer than a quaarter of the parents volunteer. That's very different at most of the private schools. Most parents are required to do so as do many alumni.

No, I do not work for the DOE or any other public agency. No, I do not have children in the public school system. Yes, I regularly volunteer as a reading tutor at one of my neighborhood puiblic elentary schools. And, yes, I work fulltime.
Environaut

Hilo, HI

#19 Aug 3, 2008
Sorry:
turly should be truly
quaarter should be quarter
elentary should be elementary
Local Loco

Honolulu, HI

#20 Aug 3, 2008
The DOE continues to minimize the problem "because they missed goals by just one or two ...". Come on ..... Hawaii schools continue to struggle and I point the finger at teachers and administrators who continually focus on AYP instead of students as individuals and persons. Until ALL elementary schools can move kids onto middle school at a reasonable level of competence, then the upper levels will suffer. Until middle schools can reasonable engage kids to continue and prepare for high schools, then high schools will suffer. And high schools, with teachers who don't give a damn, why should students give a damn. Schools should be held accountable for delivering students at minimum competency levels to allow them the potential to develop. AYP today is the result of failures over the past 7 to 10 years .... with no correction in sight. What is DOE's "strategic plan" to fix this???? drug testing? How about having teachers get back to being caring nurturing individuals (or perhaps union rules don't allow that).... At least the kids will WANT TO ENGAGE AND LEARN.
CAUGHT

San Diego, CA

#22 Aug 3, 2008
You know who thought up this plan right? BUSH

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