Studies show growing amount of phosphorus in rivers feeding Lake Er...

Full story: Columbus Dispatch

Researchers have recorded some of the highest phosphorus levels ever in rivers that feed into Lake Erie and cause huge algae blooms and growing oxygen-depleted "dead zones." Samples taken three times a day by Heidelberg University researchers show that the Maumee River has its highest-ever recorded dissolved phosphorus levels in 33 years of ...
Comments
1 - 19 of 19 Comments Last updated Jul 27, 2010
boneyard

Newark, OH

#1 Jul 26, 2010
Thanks alot Farn Bureau.
Kelly

Newark, OH

#2 Jul 26, 2010
Coincidence? The ocean, our Rivers and our Lakes waters being poisoned, polluted and all the dead zones so our fish and ways of life are disappearing? Get ready people, something is definitely going on and with this administration, it does not surprise me. They have an agenda alright!
Jon H

Columbus, OH

#3 Jul 26, 2010
boneyard wrote:
Thanks alot Farn Bureau.
pollution regulations don't apply to farmers or big business, just the little guys.
Sick of people

Columbus, OH

#4 Jul 26, 2010
So the planet is dying - as if I did not know that already. Human beings
are a real bummer.

I am a 74 yrs old female, I've seen alot. I have children, grandchilldren and
now great grandchildren. I am so sorry for them and the mess we are
leaving behind for them to try and fix, I can only hope.

Since: Jul 10

Columbus, OH

#5 Jul 26, 2010
Here comes phosphorus free dishwasher soap; here comes dishes that don't get clean! Thanks a lot, greenies!
analpore

Delaware, OH

#6 Jul 26, 2010
Good luck getting farmers to actually have a care for the land beyond their farms. "Kelly"- get a clue this has been going on for years just the highest in 33 years. I wonder what the nitrogen concentrations were? Louis Bromfield used crop rotation at Malabar Farm to prevent the use of so much fertilizer but todays farm is focused on money and money alone. Gone are the days when the farming was an avocation.Now farming like education and health care is focused on the bottom line not quality. Farmers used to plow and disc in the remains of the crop to enrich the soil, replenishing the nutrients they had removed through growing. Now use a seed drill and all the fertilizer you can, hence run off as the soil will only accept the amount it needs.Dupont said it best-"Better living through chemistry".

Since: Jun 10

Canal Winchester, OH

#7 Jul 26, 2010
Old news.
When those responsible become responsible and stop dumping excessive fertilizers and waste in our drainage, streams and rivers, there won't be a problem.
It is all about growing up and becoming responsible citizens (the government, politicians and the citizens).
ohio lawyer

Columbus, OH

#8 Jul 26, 2010
Our state officials need the guts to go after pollution from farms, which is preventable.
Steely Dan

Columbus, OH

#9 Jul 26, 2010
It's those doggone Amish and Mennonites.....They have organized against all of the other farmers and are obviously winning the war!!!!!!!!! They are a mean bunch......
oh boy

Bryan, OH

#10 Jul 26, 2010
Phosphrous free soap where you been? It has been in general use in the great lakes for a long time and if you read the article they traced it back to ag run off. It is time to move past the policy of education only for farmers and begin a fine system for failure to use best management practices.
HighFalutten

Columbus, OH

#11 Jul 26, 2010
Those darned "Libs" just wanna limit our freedom to destroy the environment !!!

Get the government off my back and lemme pollute as the Founding Fathers intended !!!

Since: Mar 10

Grove City, OH

#12 Jul 26, 2010
analpore wrote:
Good luck getting farmers to actually have a care for the land beyond their farms. "Kelly"- get a clue this has been going on for years just the highest in 33 years. I wonder what the nitrogen concentrations were? Louis Bromfield used crop rotation at Malabar Farm to prevent the use of so much fertilizer but todays farm is focused on money and money alone. Gone are the days when the farming was an avocation.Now farming like education and health care is focused on the bottom line not quality. Farmers used to plow and disc in the remains of the crop to enrich the soil, replenishing the nutrients they had removed through growing. Now use a seed drill and all the fertilizer you can, hence run off as the soil will only accept the amount it needs.Dupont said it best-"Better living through chemistry".
Mostly agree, but other factors are selling of farmland for more and more development, and constantly increasing population, which must be fed on less and less farmland. Thus, some of these procedures are due to these pressures. That does NOT absolve all farmers of doing the right thing.
HighFalutten

Columbus, OH

#13 Jul 26, 2010
Wilhelm Klink wrote:
Here comes phosphorus free dishwasher soap; here comes dishes that don't get clean! Thanks a lot, greenies!
MYTH BUSTER TIME !

I used Biokleen dishwasher detergent. Kroger had it marked down to $4 per 60-load canister ($4 from $6-$8), so I took a gamble and bought several canisters of the stuff.

To my surprise, Biokleen works VERY well on the most dried on / burnt on dishes. Not only does it work very well, but it doesn't "coat" your dishes with industrial chemicals like the big brand detergents do. Nor does it fill your kitchen / house with steam filled with industrial chemicals. After using Biokleen free & clear for several weeks... I went back and used my big brand detergent once... My eyes were watering like crazy, not being used to the regular brand's chemicals wafting through the air.

* Biokleen laundry detergent also works VERY well.
* Penguin Sport Wash works even better; it also preserves your clothing from layers of detergent buildup and chlorine fading.
* Toilet Bowl Cleaner from "Earth Friendly Products" works phenominally well.

Ditto for most of those organic, natural, eco friendly cleaners. The prices seem steep up front, but if you shop around you can usually get them on sale or on serious markdown (since they don't sell very fast here in Enviro-Clueless Ohio). And even at the retail price, the product is concentrated enough that you're almost always paying just as much for Tide.

If you can't afford to pay the "organic markup," Big Lots sells a Phosphorous free brand called SUN-Sations for only $1 per bottle.
Sorry But

Canal Winchester, OH

#14 Jul 26, 2010
I have never found a "green"-branded household cleaning product that worked even half as well as a regular namebrand product. Many wasted dollars.
In the Know

Delaware, OH

#15 Jul 26, 2010
The OEPA has spent two decades pushing stormwater treatment as an unfunded mandate on communities across Ohio. These harmless silt and sediment particles have been diverted from our rivers and into landfills instead. Guess what? Phosphorus attaches itself to silt and sediment (and becomes harmless) as one of nature's beutifal way of balancing the environment. The Mr. Wizards at the OEPA have created an imbalance in our rivers by reducing silt and sediment. How long is it going to take the media to catch on to this? Another decade?
Sandy Lake Erie

Toledo, OH

#16 Jul 26, 2010
Water is the oil of the future - it is an economic driver. Places that have good water should thrive..
Since 2003 the amount of algae in Western Lake Erie has increased. The bad algae - microcystis(some say this is bacteria) is from too many nutrients. The problem is not unique to Lake Erie. Chesapeake Bay, the Mississippi/Gulf, Florida lakes and rivers have too much bad algae. What are those areas doing? The Chesapeake is mandating % nutrient reductions coming into the tributaries. Florida(and Wisconsin) are proposing nutrient standards with discharge limits. The main oppoosiition to nutrient reductions in waters is the Farm Bureau..
If we think there can be algae reductions in Lake Erie through voluntary actions..think again..
If water is a valued resource we need to adopt nutrient standards and reduce the nutrient loads coming into Lake Erie.. This is not limited to farms - the Detroit Wastewater plant has dumped billions of gallons of sewage overflows in the last month into Lake Erie. The Detroit wastewater plant is the largest in North America.
Ohioans should require Michigan to keep theie own sewage and not dump it into Lake Erie where few Michiganders are impacted. Along with reinstituting the Ohio Michigan Water War, Ohio needs to get serious about reducing phosphrous in Lake Erie by adopting discharge limits. We need to defend the water we need for our future.
mark

Columbus, OH

#17 Jul 26, 2010
I have a boat and family condo up on lake erie. The algae blooms are as bad as advertised. When you see one, the water looks radioactive green. Lake Erie is our greatest natural wonder by far as well as an economic driver (I'm living proof - I've spent untold amount of money up on the north coast). Once again, the environment takes a distant 2nd to business and farm interests. There should be nutrient limits and environmental regulations that should be mandatory and punitive, not optional. The farmers and rural politicians they control will never go for this. It's up us enlightened ones to make a difference. Before you brand me as just another hippie liberal, I must disclose I'm a republican; mostly because I happen to live in Columbus.

Since: Jul 10

Columbus, OH

#18 Jul 26, 2010
HighFalutten wrote:
<quoted text>
MYTH BUSTER TIME !
I used Biokleen dishwasher detergent. Kroger had it marked down to $4 per 60-load canister ($4 from $6-$8), so I took a gamble and bought several canisters of the stuff.
To my surprise, Biokleen works VERY well on the most dried on / burnt on dishes. Not only does it work very well, but it doesn't "coat" your dishes with industrial chemicals like the big brand detergents do. Nor does it fill your kitchen / house with steam filled with industrial chemicals. After using Biokleen free & clear for several weeks... I went back and used my big brand detergent once... My eyes were watering like crazy, not being used to the regular brand's chemicals wafting through the air.
* Biokleen laundry detergent also works VERY well.
* Penguin Sport Wash works even better; it also preserves your clothing from layers of detergent buildup and chlorine fading.
* Toilet Bowl Cleaner from "Earth Friendly Products" works phenominally well.
Ditto for most of those organic, natural, eco friendly cleaners. The prices seem steep up front, but if you shop around you can usually get them on sale or on serious markdown (since they don't sell very fast here in Enviro-Clueless Ohio). And even at the retail price, the product is concentrated enough that you're almost always paying just as much for Tide.
If you can't afford to pay the "organic markup," Big Lots sells a Phosphorous free brand called SUN-Sations for only $1 per bottle.
Interesting. I bought some crappy "greenie" soap at Aldi's and threw it in the trash and went back to Cascade.
ohio lawyer

Columbus, OH

#19 Jul 27, 2010
Sandy Lake Erie wrote:
Water is the oil of the future - it is an economic driver. Places that have good water should thrive..
Since 2003 the amount of algae in Western Lake Erie has increased. The bad algae - microcystis(some say this is bacteria) is from too many nutrients. The problem is not unique to Lake Erie. Chesapeake Bay, the Mississippi/Gulf, Florida lakes and rivers have too much bad algae. What are those areas doing? The Chesapeake is mandating % nutrient reductions coming into the tributaries. Florida(and Wisconsin) are proposing nutrient standards with discharge limits. The main oppoosiition to nutrient reductions in waters is the Farm Bureau..
If we think there can be algae reductions in Lake Erie through voluntary actions..think again..
If water is a valued resource we need to adopt nutrient standards and reduce the nutrient loads coming into Lake Erie.. This is not limited to farms - the Detroit Wastewater plant has dumped billions of gallons of sewage overflows in the last month into Lake Erie. The Detroit wastewater plant is the largest in North America.
Ohioans should require Michigan to keep theie own sewage and not dump it into Lake Erie where few Michiganders are impacted. Along with reinstituting the Ohio Michigan Water War, Ohio needs to get serious about reducing phosphrous in Lake Erie by adopting discharge limits. We need to defend the water we need for our future.
Agreed, Sandy.

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