Mike Peterson

Jackson, MS

#41 Jun 4, 2013
William wrote:
Wait, hasn't the Catholic church been the same, yesterday and today?
Sounds like you've got something akin to a Disciples of Christ branch, a Stone branch, and a Campbellite branch to me.
A little family disagreement. When Constantine moved the business and social center of the World from Rome to Constantinople they got a little confused.
But they are an apsotlic Church with valid sacraments and believe in the real prescence and of course appreciates the Mother of God like us. Of coures they did a little splitting up without Authority.

They have beautiful cathredals and liturgies.
Come Back Lost Sheep

New York, NY

#42 Jun 4, 2013
William wrote:
Wait, hasn't the Catholic church been the same, yesterday and today?
Sounds like you've got something akin to a Disciples of Christ branch, a Stone branch, and a Campbellite branch to me.
The Catholic church changed when they rebelled and left the original church. They were hungry for power and many examples throughout history can prove they sill are power hungry. They like the phrase "successor to Peter" Successor of what? There is only one head and King and Jesus will not be succeeded. But have they did just that?
Come Back Lost Sheep

New York, NY

#43 Jun 4, 2013
Mike Peterson wrote:
<quoted text>
A little family disagreement. When Constantine moved the business and social center of the World from Rome to Constantinople they got a little confused.
But they are an apsotlic Church with valid sacraments and believe in the real prescence and of course appreciates the Mother of God like us. Of coures they did a little splitting up without Authority.
They have beautiful cathredals and liturgies.
Actually it was a little rebellious sheep that went astray and is still lost.
1. The real church does not crusade to power grab the world killing people.
2. The real church does not sell forgiveness of sins of loved ones for filthy gain.
3. The real church does not have problems with priests and little boys.

So is this church the real original church? No they left the real church. We are the real church and do not do those things. To find the real church all one has to do is open their eyes, look at the Catholic church and look at the Orthodox church.
William

Opelika, AL

#44 Jun 4, 2013
Constantine most definitely moved "The Business" to Rome.
Mike Peterson

Birmingham, AL

#46 Jun 5, 2013
William wrote:
Constantine most definitely moved "The Business" to Rome.
From Rome. Constantinople became the "new Rome"
Mike Peterson

Birmingham, AL

#47 Jun 5, 2013
The Early Church Fathers on Infant Baptism:

Irenaeus

"He [Jesus] came to save all through himself; all, I say, who through him are reborn in God: infants, and children, and youths, and old men. Therefore he passed through every age, becoming an infant for infants, sanctifying infants; a child for children, sanctifying those who are of that age ...[so that] he might be the perfect teacher in all things, perfect not only in respect to the setting forth of truth, perfect also in respect to relative age" (Against Heresies 2:22:4 [A.D. 189]).

"‘And [Naaman] dipped himself ... seven times in the Jordan’[2 Kgs. 5:14]. It was not for nothing that Naaman of old, when suffering from leprosy, was purified upon his being baptized, but [this served] as an indication to us. For as we are lepers in sin, we are made clean, by means of the sacred water and the invocation of the Lord, from our old transgressions, being spiritually regenerated as newborn babes, even as the Lord has declared:‘Except a man be born again through water and the Spirit, he shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven’[John 3:5]" (Fragment34 [A.D. 190]).



Hippolytus

"Baptize first the children, and if they can speak for themselves let them do so. Otherwise, let their parents or other relatives speak for them" (The Apostolic Tradition 21:16 [A.D. 215]).



Origen

"Every soul that is born into flesh is soiled by the filth of wickedness and sin.... In the Church, baptism is given for the remission of sins, and, according to the usage of the Church, baptism is given even to infants. If there were nothing in infants which required the remission of sins and nothing in them pertinent to forgiveness, the grace of baptism would seem superfluous" (Homilies on Leviticus 8:3 [A.D. 248]).

"The Church received from the apostles the tradition of giving baptism even to infants. The apostles, to whom were committed the secrets of the divine sacraments, knew there are in everyone innate strains of [original] sin, which must be washed away through water and the Spirit" (Commentaries on Romans 5:9 [A.D. 248]).

Cyprian of Carthage

"As to what pertains to the case of infants: You [Fidus] said that they ought not to be baptized within the second or third day after their birth, that the old law of circumcision must be taken into consideration, and that you did not think that one should be baptized and sanctified within the eighth day after his birth. In our council it seemed to us far otherwise. No one agreed to the course which you thought should be taken. Rather, we all judge that the mercy and grace of God ought to be denied to no man born" (Letters 64:2 [A.D. 253]).

"If, in the case of the worst sinners and those who formerly sinned much against God, when afterwards they believe, the remission of their sins is granted and no one is held back from baptism and grace, how much more, then, should an infant not be held back, who, having but recently been born, has done no sin, except that, born of the flesh according to Adam, he has contracted the contagion of that old death from his first being born. For this very reason does he [an infant] approach more easily to receive the remission of sins: because the sins forgiven him are not his own but those of another" (ibid., 64:5).

Mike Peterson

Jackson, MS

#48 Jun 17, 2013
Was this Holy man a Protestant?

St. Ignatius of Antioch - Died 107 A.D.  Ignatius was a convert to the Faith and a disciple of St. John the Evangelist. St. Chrysostom says that St. Peter appointed him Bishop of Antioch, which See he governed for forty years. The saint longed to shed his blood for Christ but the opportunity was not granted him during the persecution under Domitian. While the short reign of Nerva lasted the Church was in peace, but under Trajan persecution broke out anew. In the year 107, the Emperor came to Antioch. St. Ignatius was seized and brought before him. Having confessed Christ, he was condemned to be taken in chains to Rome, there to be exposed to the wild beasts. During this last journey he was welcomed by the faithful of Smyrna, Troas, and other places along the way. He arrived in Rome just as the public spectacles in the amphitheater were drawing to a close. The faithful of the city came out to meet him. He was at once hurried to the amphitheater, where two fierce lions immediately devoured him. He ended his saintly life by a glorious death, exclaiming, "May I become agreeable bread to the Lord." His remains were carried to Antioch, where they were interred. In the reign of Theodosius they were transferred to a church within the city. At present they are venerated in Rome. During his long journey he addressed seven epistles to various congregations, in which, as a disciple of the Apostles, he testifies to the dogmatic character of Apostolic Christianity.  His feast day is October 17th.
Dave P

Lexington, KY

#49 Jun 17, 2013
I think it highly possible that we'll see Ignatius in heaven someday.

St. Chrysostom says that St. Peter appointed him Bishop of Antioch, which See he governed for forty years.

*I think the above line is garbage. Second, third hand info; Peter appointing one man a bishop? No chance. Shows the apostacy from the NT was apparently in full swing in 107 AD.

Since: Jan 10

Royse City

#50 Jun 17, 2013
See you soon. Just one week.

www.roysecitycoc.org
Dave P

Lexington, KY

#51 Jun 17, 2013
You can't see me Heath.
Mike Peterson

Birmingham, AL

#52 Jun 18, 2013
Dave P wrote:
I think it highly possible that we'll see Ignatius in heaven someday.
St. Chrysostom says that St. Peter appointed him Bishop of Antioch, which See he governed for forty years.
*I think the above line is garbage. Second, third hand info; Peter appointing one man a bishop? No chance. Shows the apostacy from the NT was apparently in full swing in 107 AD.
The NT did not exist until AD 382.

Let's see, you believe the Crusades happened? Why do you believe that?

What about Constantine? How do you know he existed?

What about the Inquisitions? Do you believe that?

You can't use SS on history.
Mike Peterson

Birmingham, AL

#53 Jun 18, 2013
St. Barnabas - Died 61 A.D. All we know of Barnabas is to be found in the New Testament. A Jew, born in Cyprus and named Joseph, he sold his property, gave the proceeds to the Apostles, who gave him the name Barnabas, and lived in common with the earliest converts to Christianity in Jerusalem. He persuaded the community there to accept Paul as a disciple, was sent to Antioch, Syria, to look into the community there, and brought Paul there from Tarsus. With Paul he brought Antioch's donation to the Jerusalem community during a famine, and returned to Antioch with John Mark, his cousin. The three went on a missionary journey to Cyprus, Perga (when John Mark went to Jerusalem), and Antioch in Pisidia, where they were so violently opposed by the Jews that they decided to preach to the pagans. Then they went on to Iconium and Lystra in Lycaonia, where they were first acclaimed gods and then stoned out of the city, and then returned to Antioch in Syria. When a dispute arose regarding the observance of the Jewish rites, Paul and Barnabas went to Jerusalem, where, at a council, it was decided that pagans did not have to be circumcised to be baptized. On their return to Antioch, Barnabas wanted to take John Mark on another visitation to the cities where they had preached, but Paul objected because of John Mark's desertion of them in Perga. Paul and Barnabas parted, and Barnabas returned to Cyprus with Mark; nothing further is heard of him, though it is believed his rift with Paul was ultimately healed. Tradition has Barnabas preaching in Alexandria and Rome, the founder of the Cypriote Church, the Bishop of Milan (which he was not), and has him stoned to death at Salamis about the year 61. The apochryphal Epistle of Barnabas was long attributed to him, but modern scholarship now attributes it to a Christian in Alexandria between the years 70 and 100; the Gospel of Barnabas is probably by an Italian Christian who became a Mohammedan; and the Acts of Barnabas once attributed to John Mark are now known to have been written in the fifth century. His feast day is June 11th.

Since: Jun 11

Location hidden

#54 Jun 18, 2013
Two books for your library:

The Roman Martyrology

The Externals of the Catholic Church

Since: Jun 11

Location hidden

#55 Jun 18, 2013
MarkEden wrote:
Two books for your library:
The Roman Martyrology
The Externals of the Catholic Church
And two more:

The Mass of the Early Christians

Four Witnesses: The Early Church in Her Own Words
Mike Peterson

Birmingham, AL

#56 Jun 18, 2013
MarkEden wrote:
<quoted text>
And two more:
The Mass of the Early Christians
Four Witnesses: The Early Church in Her Own Words
I currently have this one on the way. It is fairly new.

History of the Catholic Church: From the Apostolic Age to the Third Millennium . James Hitchcock
Dave P

Lexington, KY

#57 Jun 18, 2013
Mike Peterson wrote:
<quoted text>
The NT did not exist until AD 382.
That's exactly why I don't believe the quote about Peter appointing one man as a bishop to be head of a local congregation.
Dave P

Lexington, KY

#58 Jun 18, 2013
Mike Peterson wrote:
St. Barnabas - Died 61 A.D. All we know of Barnabas is to be found in the New Testament.
Exactly. And that's all we need to know. Anything after is spam.

Since: Jul 11

Location hidden

#59 Jun 18, 2013
Mike Peterson

Birmingham, AL

#60 Jun 18, 2013
Dave P wrote:
<quoted text>
Exactly. And that's all we need to know. Anything after is spam.
So you don't believe the inquisitions and crusades happened ? They were not in the Bible.
Mike Peterson

Birmingham, AL

#61 Jun 18, 2013
When I find a Protestant I will be sure to post it.

Probably around 1520.

St. Irenaeus - Born 125 A.D. Died 202 A.D. The writings of St. Irenaeus entitle him to a high place among the fathers of the Church, for they not only laid the foundations of Christian theology but, by exposing and refuting the errors of the gnostics, they delivered the Catholic Faith from the real danger of the doctrines of those heretics. He was probably born about the year 125, in one of those maritime provinces of Asia Minor where the memory of the apostles was still cherished and where Christians were numerous. He was most influenced by St. Polycarp who had known the apostles or their immediate disciples. Many Asian priests and missionaries brought the gospel to the pagan Gauls and founded a local church. To this church of Lyon, Irenaeus came to serve as a priest under its first bishop, St. Pothinus, an Oriental like himself. In the year 177, Irenaeus was sent to Rome. This mission explains how it was that he was not called upon to share in the martyrdom of St. Pothinus during the terrible persecution in Lyons. When he returned to Lyons it was to occupy the vacant bishopric. By this time, the persecution was over. It was the spread of gnosticism in Gaul, and the ravages it was making among the Christians of his diocese, that inspired him to undertake the task of exposing its errors. He produced a treatise in five books in which he sets forth fully the inner doctrines of the various sects, and afterwards contrasts them with the teaching of the Apostles and the text of the Holy Scripture. His work, written in Greek but quickly translated to Latin, was widely circulated and succeeded in dealing a death-blow to Gnosticism. At any rate, from that time onwards, it ceased to offer a serious menace to the Catholic faith. The date of death of St. Irenaeus is not known, but it is believed to be in the year 202. The bodily remains of St. Irenaeus were buried in a crypt under the altar of what was then called the church of St. John, but was later known by the name of St. Irenaeus himself. This tomb or shrine was destroyed by the Calvinists in 1562, and all trace of his relics seems to have perished. His feast is June 28th.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Martinsville Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Sola fide? 27 min Bobby 49
Are You Ready? 3 hr HEATH - 72 125
Why They Left: Listening to Those Who Have Left... (May '12) 4 hr Bobby 41
Catholics (Feb '14) 7 hr Bobby 1,006
COC and KJV Bible (Jan '13) Thu _Randy_ 85
Which church is this Thu Bobby 37
What Does Johnny Robertson Say Thu Mitchell_Ferguson 2
•••
•••
•••

Martinsville Jobs

•••
•••
•••

Martinsville People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

•••

Martinsville News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Martinsville
•••

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]
•••