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Since: Jul 12

Oceana, WV

#1 Jun 22, 2013
You all LOVE some sports, don't you?

I think there are fewer things more boring than watching other people play games. However, the men in my household are super-obsessed with basketball & football - I have tried to watch and care, but I find it completely uninteresting.

I assessed long ago that Netflix and the internet covers our "at home viewing" and that cable only annoyed us with it's incessant news - think of the money I could save by eliminating our cable bill. We carry cable for no other reason than to watch basketball and football. I draw the line at purchasing cable sports packages - my family would spend weeks unable to stop watching one game after another.

I heard some bitter attitudes towards school sports - why are sports so great they get more funding than subjects that may better prepare the children for the future? Why do sports events earn so much money? Do we encourage children to choose sports over arts?

Why do you like sports so much?
Dave P

Lexington, KY

#2 Jun 22, 2013
Sports are a distraction from life; a way to relive our childhoods and dreams. Men I think are competitive by nature, so they appeal to us.

Sports can become obsessive with many people. It is a passion that rivals almost nothing else. WVU football is probably close to that. Idolatry is actually a good honest term for many's views toward sports.

I had to quit watching sports. Kentucky is basketball crazy, it is 24/7/365 and just too much. I am a huge Cincinnati Bengals fan, and last season was a good but nerve-racking season. Not a good combination for someone having bad anxiety attacks.

It also takes too much time away from other stuff. And you are right about money-we spend all this money in high school and colleges to pay for uniforms, fields, bus trips, the athletic departments while teachers get laid off and kids use 10 year old text books. Ridiculous.

Plus, I wholeheartedly believe sports are rigged for gambling too. Bottom line-sports are soap operas for men. Much like pro wrestling.
William

Pell City, AL

#3 Jun 22, 2013
I played sports growing up and in college. Learned about teamwork, sacrifice, hard work, and the real differences between winning and losing.

Plus it was always fun, and I made lots of friends. Good memories. I coach girls basketball now for my daughter's teams and we have a lot of fun.
Dave P

Lexington, KY

#4 Jun 22, 2013
William wrote:
I played sports growing up and in college. Learned about teamwork, sacrifice, hard work, and the real differences between winning and losing.
Plus it was always fun, and I made lots of friends. Good memories. I coach girls basketball now for my daughter's teams and we have a lot of fun.
That's the benefits of sports, and they are good. Like everything, too much can be a bad thing.
Bobby

Fort Worth, TX

#5 Jun 23, 2013
Awesome_Steve_Monkey wrote:
You all LOVE some sports, don't you?
I think there are fewer things more boring than watching other people play games. However, the men in my household are super-obsessed with basketball & football - I have tried to watch and care, but I find it completely uninteresting.
I assessed long ago that Netflix and the internet covers our "at home viewing" and that cable only annoyed us with it's incessant news - think of the money I could save by eliminating our cable bill. We carry cable for no other reason than to watch basketball and football. I draw the line at purchasing cable sports packages - my family would spend weeks unable to stop watching one game after another.
I heard some bitter attitudes towards school sports - why are sports so great they get more funding than subjects that may better prepare the children for the future? Why do sports events earn so much money? Do we encourage children to choose sports over arts?
Why do you like sports so much?
Very good points. I once followed the cowboys faithfully, but now hardly ever watch them, never cared much for anything but football. As for tv we have dish and I am annoyed that I must buy a hundred other channels just to get fox news and the western channels. Everything is geared toward making us believe we must have this, that or the other. I grew up without tv, telephone, running water, electricity or indoor toilets. Life was good, I learned to pluck the feathers off a chicken, draw water out of a well and ride horses. We even had an old ford pickup and a tractor which I learned to drive as a kid- Life was hard but it was good! I remember going to a tent revival because we were looking for entertainment. If we could save up 15 cents we went to the movies-guess what most of them were- westerns.
Mike Peterson

Jackson, MS

#6 Jun 23, 2013
Bobby wrote:
<quoted text>
Very good points. I once followed the cowboys faithfully, but now hardly ever watch them, never cared much for anything but football. As for tv we have dish and I am annoyed that I must buy a hundred other channels just to get fox news and the western channels. Everything is geared toward making us believe we must have this, that or the other. I grew up without tv, telephone, running water, electricity or indoor toilets. Life was good, I learned to pluck the feathers off a chicken, draw water out of a well and ride horses. We even had an old ford pickup and a tractor which I learned to drive as a kid- Life was hard but it was good! I remember going to a tent revival because we were looking for entertainment. If we could save up 15 cents we went to the movies-guess what most of them were- westerns.
Try watching ch 261 on Dish and record The Journey Home show. Be careful though. It has caused thousands of converts and reverts over the years.

Since: Jul 12

Oceana, WV

#7 Jun 23, 2013
My family claims I am simply jealous of how they like something that I don't. I think it is because I am the opposite of competitive - I always sympathize with the losers. It is even more interesting to them because there is literally millions and billions of dollars thrown around based on people throwing a ball around - it is just as entertaining to follow the careers of the athletes and couches, managers and teams. I find it to be unbelievable! But then, I find our society in general to be outrageous in lots of ways - professional sports is only one.

I think playing sports and watching sports are two different things. I agree that children need to get out of their chairs and run around for whatever reason - sports encourages them to explore the potential of their bodies - physical fitness is definitely a way to train our children to be adults.

There is a point when the children's sports turn commercial - less about training children and more about drawing attention and being profitable. It is in High School when the half-interested kids get cut from the team and sports can become the MOST important activity in school to some kids and many parents as well.

To be successful in sports is to "strive for excellence" and who could blame anyone from wanting the attention and pride that goes with being the best? Actually, it feels so good that it's extended to those "fans" who didn't actually accomplish anything, but who are as proud and boastful as any team member. That "pride" is converted to dollars and that is how a game is converted to a business - I suggest that our public schools would better prepare our children if they avoided "doing business" with the children's activities. But, they need funds to support these "extra" subjects like sports - if sports are that important to our children's development, why aren't they included in the school's budget? They don't need to be, their profitability will support them - it's as if the only logical way to support our sports programs is through profits from sports activities - and that the sport's profits should ALL be funneled back into the team - sports is so popular and well-funded because it is so profitable.

College is a continuation of the same - only accomplished HS players are accepted on teams - "learning" a sport you've never played before in college is more like a past-time than a subject studied. College athletes are trained to be professional athletes - professional sports is Big Business. It becomes something so different from the sports that are played for fun - is it really the same?
William

Millbrook, AL

#8 Jun 23, 2013
ASM, an extremely low percentage of college athletes ever even sniff pro sports. Most aren't even on scholarship, let alone a full ride scholarship (which is subject to being renewed annually).

Since: Jul 12

Oceana, WV

#9 Jun 23, 2013
It is a rare occasion that any professional basketball or football team take on a member who has NOT played college sports. Even if college athletes have no desire to pursue sports professionally - they are trained to treat their bodies like the temple it would have to be if they WERE to play their sport professionally. I'd say former college athletes must be the most enthusiastic sports fans since they know from experience all the work behind the show.

So, you know, I'm not MAD that people like to watch sports or play sports - I am happy for people to do what they enjoy doing. I am simply bumfuzzled about what makes sports so worthy of the attention and athletes so worthy of their salaries.

For example: I spent 13 months cross-stitching a set of 3 5x7 pictures of vegetables that now hang in my kitchen and are quite priceless to me. Certainly, I am not a professional cross-stitcher, but many, many hours were invested in my project that I could possibly sell for $200 on a good day. That's less than $1 per hour. Fact: cross-stitching is NOT a profitable investment of time and effort. What is it about sports that makes people so interested in it and motivates them to spend so much money to be entertained by it? Why is cross-stitching so worthless?

I think Dave was on the right track when he mentioned competitiveness and gambling. That's what cross-stitching lacks.
William

Millbrook, AL

#10 Jun 23, 2013
I bet you could start a competitive cross-stitching league.

You know you could!

Since: Jul 12

Oceana, WV

#11 Jun 23, 2013
William wrote:
I bet you could start a competitive cross-stitching league.
You know you could!
I could never do that! If any of my competitors needed my help, I would drop my project to help with theirs. I don't want to be the best cross-stitcher - I just like to cross-stitch. Perhaps I should start a cross-stitching club. The only problem with that is: I am the only person left in the world who cross-stitches. I'm already a member of the one-person cross-stitch club.

Let me think of a better example: suppose two couples have quintuplets - not a profitable venture. Each couple must have the skills and financial support to raise 5 children at once. However, let's say one couple works constantly to pay nannies and day-cares, while the other couple allows their lives to be filmed and produced as a cable show. One of these couples have commercialized their lives - which one has acted in the best interest of their children? A cable show is definitely more profitable than working for the cable company - but it is society that has deemed the skills of one couple more valuable than the same skills of the other couple. It is the "entertainment" factor - the same one that determines that scoring touchdowns is worth millions of dollars. Why does our society invest so much money in being entertained??

Again - I'm not complaining - please, carry on following your favorite teams and purchasing jerseys and foam fingers. But do you agree at all that society holds professional sports as a much larger priority than it actually is? How do you think our failing economy will effect professional sports? Our society as a whole is going to HAVE to cut costs to continue to live within our decreasing dollar - do you think sports will gradually get the ax?

Since: Jul 12

Oceana, WV

#12 Jun 24, 2013
OK OK - how about this one:

Suppose two boys played on a basketball team together from grades: 3-8. They were good buddies and very much alike. Upon entering HS, one boy played basketball well enough to join the Varsity BB team, while the other played JV like most freshmen. Boy A becomes very popular and well-known for his BB skills, mentioned by teachers and parents as a fine example for kids his age - so ambitious. Boy B practices constantly and performs averagely, gaining no recognition and feeling little pride - perhaps the JV team has not been very successful and so a divide grows between Boy A and Boy B. Boy B grows jealous of the attention and praise aimed at Boy A and the divide grows larger. Years pass and by 10th grade, Boy B is eager for his chance to play Varsity - his hopes are dashed when he does not make the team - Boy A cannot be honest and tell his friend that he was not "good enough" but they both know it is true. The bitter divide between the boys grows larger when Boy A spends his time at BB practice while Boy B goes home and plays virtual BB on his PS3. Boy A is so successful with his BB, he earns money to attend a popular college where he will continue to be glorified as a hero. Boy B just plain graduated and went to just plain college where he is just one drop in a bucket.

What is the difference between Boy A and Boy B? Is it Basketball skills? Or is it that: People treat Boy A differently because of his Basketball skills? Is Boy A a more valuable person because he has such basketball skills? Suppose Boy B is an Eagle Scout - not much glory in that - but those really ARE valuable skills! Still, Boy A will ride on the shoulders of his peers while Boy B will be trampled underneath their feet.

Society glorifies athletes. I just don't get it.
William

Columbus, GA

#13 Jun 24, 2013
Boy A blows out his knee one year out of college and failed to earn a marketable degree, and now he works at Pizza Hut.

Boy B runs Apple now.

Since: Jul 12

Oceana, WV

#14 Jun 25, 2013
So, when Boy A is injured and no longer valuable to the BB team - would you say he would be surprised about suddenly NOT being glorified as he has been until that point? Do you think his focus on sports contributed to his failure to earn a marketable degree? Do you think that settling for a minimum wage job is a result of his disappointment about not being a successful athlete?

I do not pity Boy B either - certainly he had to better prioritize his goals since playing basketball just wasn't working our for him. Doesn't it seem like his future benefited by being excluded from the sports team?

This only supports my idea that sports are ranked too far up on the list of important things. Perhaps Boy A should have known better than to invest so much time, effort, and hope into an activity that doesn't REALLY prepare him to become a successful adult. How could he have known better when the "fans", his supporters, had been re-enforcing the opposite idea since he was just a freshman in HS?
William

Birmingham, AL

#15 Jun 25, 2013
"This only supports my idea that sports are ranked too far up on the list of important things. Perhaps Boy A should have known better than to invest so much time, effort, and hope into an activity that doesn't REALLY prepare him to become a successful adult."

Kids will be kids, but if they listen to the myriad of people telling them to get a solid education and manage to learn how to work the discipline of sports into a work ethic after they leave sports, they will always come out ahead. The same ethic can be applied to the military, where you learn discipline, prioritization, and teamwork that carries you into non-military careers well ... but only if you apply yourself and what you learned. It always comes back to self-will.

That's what worked for me.

Since: Jul 12

Oceana, WV

#16 Jun 25, 2013
The difference between sports and the military is that professional athletes earn around $400,000-$1,800,000 per year. Do you think the work that the military does is less important than the work of athletes? Why wouldn't they be paid as much?

I know why! Society is whack!

Why do performers get paid millions to sing songs and act in movies? Why do our school teachers have summer jobs? Who's job is more important?

Selling movies and albums is profitable. Teaching children is not. Society values profit, not job performance.

I love listening to music and watching movies and I know you love watching sports. There's nothing wrong with pursuing the entertainment that is available to us. My issue is that entertainment is so much more valuable to our society than activities that actually benefit the members of our society. We support a society that has taught us that this is true. It's not really true.

Building bridges is more important than scoring touchdowns - why aren't the people doing those things accurately compensated?
William

Fruithurst, AL

#17 Jun 25, 2013
Entertainment and sports are not valuable to society as a whole. They are past-times and are assigned value based on what the market will bear for them.

Regarding the military, is a Navy SEAL, an Air Force fighter pilot, or a Marine sniper worth more to the nation than a Navy cook, an Army postal clerk, or a Coast Guard truck driver?

Since: Jul 12

Oceana, WV

#18 Jun 25, 2013
YES! They are more skilled. They hold more important positions because they are more experienced, more specifically trained, and literally risking their lives to perform their duties. The cooks and clerks and drivers SUPPORT those who fight, but do not actually fight, so their compensation SHOULD be less. The positions are all important ones, but risking death is worth more than cooking food.

Again, the main difference between athletes and military members is that playing sports is profitable and fighting wars is not. In the past, war stimulated our economy - back when WE produced the tools of war. The US hardly produces anything anymore - China does. THIS war has not created jobs - except military jobs - and it has benefited our country least of any war before. If war is profitable to anyone, it is Big Business, not military personnel or the general population.

But you already agree with me: entertainment is valuable based on it's profitability - it's marketability. Profit is how our society decides what is and is not important. I suggest that it is a poor way to judge value.
William

Birmingham, AL

#19 Jun 26, 2013
It is a poor way to judge value to society at large. An NFL quarterback is highly unlikely to develop a cold fusion power source, and a PhD physicist is highly unlikely to lead an NFL team to a Super Bowl victory.
Dave P

Sarasota, FL

#20 Jun 26, 2013
And which of those is most important? Decline of the Roman Empire is what we're seeing with America. Politicians, athletes, entertainers making more than everyone else.
What's that old quote Babe Ruth gave when he found out he made more than the POTUS? "I had a better year than he did". That was over 80 years ago.

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