Best Use Of Fiber Optics In Downtown ...

Best Use Of Fiber Optics In Downtown Vallejo ???

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swamp dogg

Vallejo, CA

#167 Jul 29, 2014
first there will be a specific plan amendment and the vibsters will go wild!
don't tell me about goals, there is no goal to ban casinos, lol.
Port parrot

Vacaville, CA

#168 Jul 31, 2014
While the nation's largest internet service providers have been making lots of noise recently, the country's fastest network has stayed quiet, just like the Tennessee town it services.
The southern city of Chattanooga, Tennessee, with a population of about 170,000, boasts internet speeds up to a whopping gigabit per second, thanks to a local municipal fiber internet network, and has since last year. That's the same speed as Google Fiber, only there's no legacy tech giant pumping technology into the project.
The city of Chattanooga and the publicly owned electric utility EPB did it by themselves.
Big telecom companies like AT&T and Comcast put off plans to outfit southeastern Tennessee with high-speed internet, essentially forcing the city to look for internet solutions elsewhere, Motherboard reports. This is actually a trend. Though Chattanooga's internet is notable for its blinding speed, many small communities around the country are similarly taking on high-speed internet without the help of big-name ISPs.
In fact, often the ISPs are holding these neglected communities back. In 2011 Longmont, Colorado, passed a ballot referendum that lifted a 2005 state law stopping municipalities from selling services that rely on publicly owned infrastructures, the Denver Post reported. Cable companies like Comcast originally pushed for the law in 2005 because they felt it was "unfair to let tax-supported entities compete with tax-paying businesses," the Post said.
More than 20 states still have laws like this one on the books, Motherboard reported. The FCC recently said it would help small communities get past these laws if it meant faster internet for them. This was in June.
Earlier this month, Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tennessee) proposed an amendment that would make the FCC's move illegal. Almost every House Republican voted yes. Now the amendment is in the largely Democratic Senate where it's not likely to pass but still could, perhaps with a little help from big cable companies.
"Ultimately what it comes down to is these cable companies hate competition," said Chris Mitchell, the director of community broadband networks for the Institute for Local Self Reliance.
As director, Mitchell watches over issues like municipal networks, net neutrality, and the consolidation of cable companies, advocating for the public. "It's not about [cable's] arguments so much as their ability to lobby very well," he said.
He says that both Republicans and Democrats receive a lot of money from cable companies every year. Blackburn herself has recieved five-figure donations from AT&T, Verizon, and the National Cable and Telecommunications Association, opensecrets.org says.
Of course the anti-municipal fiber network crowd does have arguments. A common one is that local government-backed fiber networks are often failures that put tax dollars at risk, which Mitchell says is factually inaccurate. The other is that it's unfair to allow private companies to compete with government-backed entities, which Mitchell agrees is worth debating.
Municipal fiber internet networks certainly don't fit in every community. They're expensive to build — the Washington Post says Chattanooga's cost $330 million — and a handful have failed. Mitchell says most governments don't really want to have to build and run their own networks, despite their quality and popularity. Ideally, he says, local governments across the nation could fund the construction of a fiber network and then partner with a third party to run the service. This is happening in several cities nationwide, and it works well, though the number is climbing slowly.
"The first reason a community builds a network tends to be jobs. It helps existing businesses and draws in new ones," Mitchell said. "Most of these laws were passed in 2004, 2005. People didn't think the internet was essential for business."
a b see sammie

Vallejo, CA

#169 Jul 31, 2014
the nature of this thread is offensive to me, always some new scheme focused on downtown jewel by the sea.
now then, platzer, you still insist nobody wants to build on north mare island?
that's where the fiber is going with new infrastructure, not extended to cheap real estate in downtown.
advocate for all of vallejo not just the freaking downtown!
copy that?
Port parrot

Vacaville, CA

#170 Jul 31, 2014
Listen idiot boy, the fiber already exists on Mare Island. It can be taped into as easily on North Mare Island as it can be in downtown or Jessie Bethel High for that matter. It is everywhere in all of Vallejo. The question is what you want tapping into it? I don't care if it is a casino or what. The point is to use it.
a b see sammie

Vallejo, CA

#171 Jul 31, 2014
look moron, the point is fcuk downtown, see?
i already told you the fiber on mare island will be extended into the north mare island landfill development. did you miss that part?
vallejo heights?
downtown?
figures.
Port parrot

Vacaville, CA

#172 Jul 31, 2014
Susan Crawford says that in cities like Seoul and Stockholm, high-speed, high-capacity networks are taken for granted. "It really is astonishing what's going on in America," she says. "We're falling way behind in the pack of developed nations when it comes to high-speed Internet access, capacity and prices." (iStockphoto)

For an increasing number of Americans, access to high-speed Internet has become an essential part of our lives. We do work, email friends, find restaurants, watch videos and movies, and check the weather. And the Internet is increasingly used for important services, like video medical consults and online education, and is relied upon by businesses for critical operations.

Under a recent court decision, Internet service providers, primarily cable companies, aren't required to treat all websites equally. They can make deals to provide faster service to some, or slow down sites that refuse to pay them extra fees. Law professor Susan Crawford says you may be experiencing the effects of this — without realizing it.

Why, for example, do you have to wait for YouTube videos to buffer? Crawford explains: "You may think it's the YouTube application. You may think there is something wrong with your computer. It's probably the network provider making life unpleasant for YouTube because YouTube has refused to pay in order to cross its wires to reach you. And we'll be seeing much more of that kind of activity in the future."

Crawford, author of Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the Gilded Age, explains how we got to this point. "The [Federal Communications Commission] in the early 2000s really thought that competition would do the job of regulatory oversight — that that would protect Americans," she tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. The idea was that cable, telephone and wireless companies would battle it out, which would yield low prices for American consumers. "As it turns out, they were wrong and we've come into an era where these markets have consolidated and for most Americans, their only choice for high-speed, high-capacity Internet connection is their local cable monopoly."

Crawford says that American Internet service is falling behind other nations because cable companies have such dominance in many markets, and that will undermine our ability to compete in a global economy. She warns: "Unless somebody in the system has industrial policy in mind, a long-term picture of where the United States needs to be and has the political power to act on it, we'll be a Third World country when it comes to communications."
Anonymous

Vallejo, CA

#173 Aug 1, 2014
Download a movie in LESS than the blink of an eye: World's fastest network can download a film in 0.2 MILLISECONDS
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/articl...

Scientists have created the world's fastest network that can download a movie faster than you can blink, by using a new type of optical fibre to transfer 43 terabits per second. Researchers from the Technical University of Denmark used a new type of optical fibre (stock image pictured) to transfer 43 terabits per second.
Uppercut

Fairfield, CA

#174 Aug 1, 2014
How about just forget about fiber optics, its a waste of money. We cant support all these illegals and still have nice things.
a b see sammie

Vallejo, CA

#175 Aug 1, 2014
hey platzer, is blue homes on fiber? what's the deal?
forest service? touro?
is it in-use at all on mare island?
don't say "why don't you ask lennar"
give us the scoop.
Port parrot

Vacaville, CA

#176 Aug 1, 2014
Touro has fiber from AT&T. It is a very secure network that links to the main office in New York. The Forest Service has fiber too. Blue Homes probably does too. Lennar doesn't do a very good job of marketing access to fiber because they are a housing developer. The Navy left them with a ton of state of the art fiber before they left. If you read the 2001 technology report, a company called GST would delivery fiber to business users on an as needed basis. They have since gone out of business.
a b see sammie

Vallejo, CA

#177 Aug 1, 2014
there is NO DOUBT in my pea brain that cov will aim to include fiber in new construction on north mare island and in eventual new waterfront development in accordance with the bay area plan. the activists will scream bloody murder when we go after their precious waterfront sometime before next election.
the cost for cov to engage as a utility provider in the downtown area as inducement for hot new startups looking for cheap real estate is overly optimistic and foolhardy in my opinion.
our future is not suffering from lack of fiber, it's the abundance of affordable housing adding to social ills and repetitive councils fomenting same. it's political suicide in this town to come out against affordable housing.
a b see sammie

Vallejo, CA

#178 Aug 1, 2014
here's what will happen under the "platzer plan".
cov will take on becoming a comm services provider at all costs.
cov will start the incremental system extension into downtown.
small tech start-ups will give vallejo a look because of the cheap real estate next to ferry landing.
demand from tech industry will drive up rents, start-ups will bid on space. since buck owns most of the downtown, he will raise the rents since they are chomping the bit to have the high speed internet, according to platzer.
buck will be attacked for being a greedy property owner.
buck is no dummy, if there is money to be made in fiber service, he can start and run a local provider service in a public/private deal, right?
isn't that what the other cities call it when they turn over the system to sonic dot net?
then he will be attacked for getting a sweet gob deal because of the existing 28 miles of service network. but wasn't it grant money that built it, then so what if the provider gets it free of charge. i imagine there will be cries that cov should sell it for some value vib will come up with.
a b see sammie

Vallejo, CA

#179 Aug 2, 2014
more downtown crowing by frank malifrando lte today. frank, the rest of vallejo does give a ratsass about your downtown.
change is in the air?
the only thing in the air downtown this time of year is the piss stink wafting out of the alleys.
actually, i do hope to see all these start-ups chomping the bit to move to downtown after platzer gives them fiber optic. it will drive up rents and force out all these bullschmidt art galleries that do not put a dime in the general fund.
Port parrot

Vacaville, CA

#180 Aug 2, 2014
Seeing little competition and questionable demand, Internet service providers have shrugged at spending the billions of dollars needed to boost U.S. Internet speeds to match other parts of the world.
But efforts by Google Inc. and a few cities including Los Angeles are provoking an about-face.
In recent weeks, Time Warner Cable and AT&T Inc. have eagerly responded that they too are capable of delivering lightning-fast speeds in Los Angeles and other big, lucrative markets.
Though analysts see more posturing than certainty in the announcements, it’s clear that online video watchers, technology startups and financial companies might see a dramatic upgrade in Internet speeds by the end of the decade.
“Regardless of what Google ends up doing, what they’ve successfully done is introduce the idea of gigabit broadband and ask the relevant question of why more of America doesn’t have it,” said analyst Jeff Heynen at consulting firm Infonetics Research.
“We’re at the point where the threat of competition has prompted a lot of me-too responses,” Heynen said.
Since 2012, Google has offered an Internet service known as Fiber in Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan. Upload and download speeds reach 1 gigabit a second, about 40 times faster into the home and 100 times quicker out the door than the typical service used by Los Angeles residents, according to network testing company Ookla.
Nationwide, about 10 percent of households with broadband Internet get it through a fiber-optic network, according to data from a survey released this week by a trade group called Fiber to the Home Council Americas. The fiber users saved 49 hours a year waiting for Web files to load, the council estimated.
Construction of Google Fiber could begin in 34 more cities by the end of this year, and analysts said that expansion threat has in part scared more familiar Internet service providers such as Time Warner Cable Inc., Charter Communications Inc. and Cox Communications Inc. The area from Google’s home city of Mountain View to San Jose is among those potentially in the next group for Google Fiber expansion.
The other push has come from local governments. Los Angeles, for example, plans to start seeking bids late in the year on a project to make gigabit speeds accessible to all residents and businesses.
The city doesn’t plan to subsidize construction costs, but it is willing to offer up to $1 billion in incentives, including expedited permitting and a guarantee to become a customer. In turn, city officials could receive an assurance that low-income neighborhoods are not left behind.
The city’s initial questionnaire to the technology industry prompted 16 companies, including Time Warner Cable, AT&T and IBM Corp., to respond by a July 18 deadline.
Google declined to comment on why it didn’t respond, and AT&T declined to share its responses beyond that Los Angeles remains a potential target for a gigabit network. For companies like Google that lack a footprint in Los Angeles, building a network would require a significant amount of trench-digging, an expensive endeavor.
Meanwhile, Time Warner Cable said that it has plenty of upgrades planned. By modifying its existing cable network, the company said, it would triple the speed of its most expensive service in Los Angeles to 300 megabytes per second by the end of the year.
The plan is to start replacing equipment, including networking switches at the company’s plants and cable modems in people’s homes, to get to 1,000 megabytes a second — a gigabit — in 2016.
But Time Warner Cable is not promising a quick rollout. Its schedule has not been announced. When the gigabit speeds will be made available to even half of local households hasn’t been determined, leaving analysts to question the offering.
“They are trying to make it look like they have a competitive technology — they’ll get some gains, but 100 percent fiber, that’s where the future is,” said Christopher Antlitz,
Port parrot

Vacaville, CA

#181 Aug 2, 2014
Seeing little competition and questionable demand, Internet service providers have shrugged at spending the billions of dollars needed to boost U.S. Internet speeds to match other parts of the world.
But efforts by Google Inc. and a few cities including Los Angeles are provoking an about-face.
In recent weeks, Time Warner Cable and AT&T Inc. have eagerly responded that they too are capable of delivering lightning-fast speeds in Los Angeles and other big, lucrative markets.
Though analysts see more posturing than certainty in the announcements, it’s clear that online video watchers, technology startups and financial companies might see a dramatic upgrade in Internet speeds by the end of the decade.
“Regardless of what Google ends up doing, what they’ve successfully done is introduce the idea of gigabit broadband and ask the relevant question of why more of America doesn’t have it,” said analyst Jeff Heynen at consulting firm Infonetics Research.
“We’re at the point where the threat of competition has prompted a lot of me-too responses,” Heynen said.
Since 2012, Google has offered an Internet service known as Fiber in Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan. Upload and download speeds reach 1 gigabit a second, about 40 times faster into the home and 100 times quicker out the door than the typical service used by Los Angeles residents, according to network testing company Ookla.
Nationwide, about 10 percent of households with broadband Internet get it through a fiber-optic network, according to data from a survey released this week by a trade group called Fiber to the Home Council Americas. The fiber users saved 49 hours a year waiting for Web files to load, the council estimated.
Construction of Google Fiber could begin in 34 more cities by the end of this year, and analysts said that expansion threat has in part scared more familiar Internet service providers such as Time Warner Cable Inc., Charter Communications Inc. and Cox Communications Inc. The area from Google’s home city of Mountain View to San Jose is among those potentially in the next group for Google Fiber expansion.
The other push has come from local governments. Los Angeles, for example, plans to start seeking bids late in the year on a project to make gigabit speeds accessible to all residents and businesses.
The city doesn’t plan to subsidize construction costs, but it is willing to offer up to $1 billion in incentives, including expedited permitting and a guarantee to become a customer. In turn, city officials could receive an assurance that low-income neighborhoods are not left behind.
The city’s initial questionnaire to the technology industry prompted 16 companies, including Time Warner Cable, AT&T and IBM Corp., to respond by a July 18 deadline.
Google declined to comment on why it didn’t respond, and AT&T declined to share its responses beyond that Los Angeles remains a potential target for a gigabit network. For companies like Google that lack a footprint in Los Angeles, building a network would require a significant amount of trench-digging, an expensive endeavor.
Meanwhile, Time Warner Cable said that it has plenty of upgrades planned. By modifying its existing cable network, the company said, it would triple the speed of its most expensive service in Los Angeles to 300 megabytes per second by the end of the year.
The plan is to start replacing equipment, including networking switches at the company’s plants and cable modems in people’s homes, to get to 1,000 megabytes a second — a gigabit — in 2016.
But Time Warner Cable is not promising a quick rollout. Its schedule has not been announced. When the gigabit speeds will be made available to even half of local households hasn’t been determined, leaving analysts to question the offering.
“They are trying to make it look like they have a competitive technology — they’ll get some gains, but 100 percent fiber, that’s where the future is,” said Christopher Antlitz, senior analyst at Technology Business Researc
Anonymous

Vallejo, CA

#182 Aug 6, 2014
Here's a link to the Broadview information on broadband internet speed State by State. California is ranked 20th out of 50th in America for broadband internet speed on average. What a shame... the State with Silicon Valley not in the top 5. And the US in turn not even in the top 10 internationally for broadband speed. This was published in the Washington Post and the UK Daily Mail.

http://www.broadviewnet.com/blog/2014/08/inte...
Port parrot

Vacaville, CA

#183 Aug 9, 2014
Download a movie in LESS than the blink of an eye: World’s fastest network can download a film in 0.2 MILLISECONDS
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/articl...

Scientists have created the world¿s fastest network that can download a movie faster than you can blink, by using a new type of optical fibre to transfer 43 terabits per second. Researchers from the Technical University of Denmark used a new type of optical fibre (stock image pictured) to transfer 43 terabits per second.
Anonymous

Vallejo, CA

#184 Aug 29, 2014
Where you can get blazing-fast Internet speeds
https://homes.yahoo.com/news/where-you-can-ge...

A growing number of Americans have home Internet speeds that make your broadband connection look like dial-up.

Ultra-fast Internet is quickly spreading across the United States. By fast, we mean gigabit-per-second speeds, roughly 100 times faster than the average home Internet connection.

There are now 27 U.S. cities that offer gigabit Internet speeds to consumers -- up from just two cities as recently as a year ago.

AT&T, Google and CenturyLink have been the main drivers of ultra-fast Internet for home customers.
Port parrot

Vallejo, CA

#185 Oct 16, 2014
Of the more than 400 communities around the country that have built and benefitted from community networks, the town of The Dalles in Oregon may have a case for the title of “most bang for the buck.” Their commitment of $10,000 12 years ago to leverage a $1.8 million “QLife” fiber optic network has lead to a massive,$1.2 billion dollar investment from Google in the form of a huge data center, employing nearly 200 people and generating millions in tax revenues for the local community. And at the end of September, the QLife board of directors announced that they had paid off the loans used for network construction more than three years ahead of schedule.

We covered part of The Dalles’ network story two years ago: a small city of just 13,000 was told by Sprint in 2000 that it would have to wait 5 to 10 years for broadband Internet access. Meanwhile, local manufacturing was declining and employers were overlooking the town due to its outdated infrastructure. Before building the QLife network, The Dalles had no access to the major long haul fiber pathway that happened to run right through town. As city manager Nolan Young told Andrew Blum in an interview for his book “Tubes,” it was like “being a town that sits next to a freeway but has no on ramp.”

The city decided enough was enough, and partnered with the county and the local public utility district on a plan for a $1.8 million, 17 mile fiber optic loop through the community that would connect anchor institutions and offer middle mile access to private providers.

The nascent network faced opposition from a local telecom in the form of a lawsuit, which scared the public utility district away from the partnership. It had another setback when a private partner declared bankruptcy, saddling the public agency with an $800,000 loan. The city and Wasco County pressed forward with their partnership, however, and secured half of the needed $1.8 million in state and federal grants while covering the rest with loans. The city made a one-time contribution of $10,000. QLife pursued a cautious strategy, building in successive phases only after enough subscriber revenue commitments were in place to cover the requisite loan payments.

The city’s small investment has paid off many, many times over. Major network construction was completed in 2003, and in 2005 Google announced they would locate a major new data center in the town, bringing 150 jobs and a $600 million investment. Pleased with their easy access to major fiber optic infrastructure and seeing massive growth in the demand for cloud-based applications, Google announced last year that they would double down on The Dalles, investing another $600 million and creating dozens more jobs to grow their already huge facility.

The benefits of the network aren’t limited to a single major employer. Schools, a community college, a hospital, and a network of medical offices all use QLife’s fiber directly for fast, reliable, and secure data services. Seven different telecom and internet providers also lease fiber from QLife, increasing the competition and service quality available in the area.

Even Sprint, the incumbent who told the city to wait a decade for broadband, started upgrading their own network six months after QLife construction began. QLife and Google have even partnered to provide free WiFi throughout downtown and many of the surrounding areas. Now, with their debt retired ahead of schedule, the network is running an operating surplus in the hundreds of thousands that could be put to any number of good uses.

Of course, not every town that builds a fiber optic network will immediately get a $1.2 billion data center. The Dalles had several factors working in their favor when wooing Google, including cheap hydroelectric power from Bonneville Power Administration dams along the Columbia River and long haul fiber optic lines running right past their doorstep.
Anonymous

Vallejo, CA

#186 Jan 14, 2015
Obama wants to expand broadband, siding with local communities that want either to expand competition or provide municipal services themselves.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-29095...

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