News-Record & Sentinel: Madison man needs a miracle (20090420)

Mark Freeman doesn't just need the gift of a lifetime; he needs the gift of life. Full Story
a friend

United States

#1 Apr 20, 2009
No one really knows what it takes to go thru this type of illness. Every other day haveing to get dialysis treatment. People think it isn't happing to me so why do i care!!! Butt we all should care because it could be you or a loved one real soon. I am sending you my prays and my love your way. I am a A~ or i would give you one of mine.
Portia

Hometown, IL

#2 Apr 24, 2009
I am pulling for you, Mark. I am a dialysis patient myself. I don't have diabetes but I've seen the problems of my fellow dialysis patients who are diabetic. They have lost their eye sight and some have lost their limbs (legs). Stay focused on getting your kidney but always remember that God did not put us down here not to help one another. Pride will always hurt you, so do not be ashamed to ask for help. I'm sure you have helped a lot of people in your life, so now it's your turn to get help. Best of luck and keep us posted. You can check me out on www.myspace.com/portiawadley
Portia

Hometown, IL

#3 Apr 24, 2009
I am pulling for you, Mark. I am a dialysis patient myself and I have seen the problems of fellow dialysis patients that are diabetic. One lost their eye sight and some have lost their limbs (legs). In the article I read about you, you say that you do not like asking for help. Do not let pride get in your way, because God did not put us down here to not help one another. Do not feel ashamed that you are asking for help. I am sure that you have helped many people in your life, so now it is your turn to receive some help. Please keep us posted. You can check me out on www.myspace.com/portiawadley
LivingDonor101

Lorain, OH

#4 May 1, 2009
While I have the upmost sympathy for for Mr. Freeman, I take issues with a few points in this article.

1. Transplants are NOT a cure. Not every transplant is successful, and even of those that are, most recipients will require additional transplantation within their lifetime.

2. Being a living donor is not without its risks. They can suffer bleeding, blood clots, intestinal binding, testicular swelling, reduced adrenal gland function, hypertension, chronic fatigue and severely reduced kidney function.

OPTN/UNOS admits that some living donors have ended up on the waiting list themselves.

In addition, living donors can suffer from depression, anxiety and PTSD-like symptoms, yet transplant centers offer no aftercare or support.

In fact, while the medical community has been harvesting organs from living people for over 50 years, they have never felt us important enough to follow or study in a comprehensive manner, so they don't really know if it's safe in the long-term.

I encourage Mr. Freeman to research these issues before he asks a stranger to make this supreme sacrifice.

www.livingdonor101.com
Portia

Chicago, IL

#5 May 24, 2009
LivingDonor101 wrote:
While I have the upmost sympathy for for Mr. Freeman, I take issues with a few points in this article.
1. Transplants are NOT a cure. Not every transplant is successful, and even of those that are, most recipients will require additional transplantation within their lifetime.
2. Being a living donor is not without its risks. They can suffer bleeding, blood clots, intestinal binding, testicular swelling, reduced adrenal gland function, hypertension, chronic fatigue and severely reduced kidney function.
OPTN/UNOS admits that some living donors have ended up on the waiting list themselves.
In addition, living donors can suffer from depression, anxiety and PTSD-like symptoms, yet transplant centers offer no aftercare or support.
In fact, while the medical community has been harvesting organs from living people for over 50 years, they have never felt us important enough to follow or study in a comprehensive manner, so they don't really know if it's safe in the long-term.
I encourage Mr. Freeman to research these issues before he asks a stranger to make this supreme sacrifice.
www.livingdonor101.com
In regards to LivingDonor101 #1 point: Nowhere does the article state that transplantation is a cure. Every piece of transplant material that I have read always stated that transplantation is not a cure and that the person receiving the kidney will be on medications for the rest of their life. The material also stated that there is always a chance for kidney rejection with the person being placed (back) on dialysis.

In regards to point #2: The transplantation material that I have read (and much of it) always stated the risk of the donor, along with estimated expenses the donor may/may not have to pay, depending on their insurance.

Now LivingDonor101 is correct about the fact that there is no data on living donors. I have seen post transplant data and stats for the people who received an organ but I have never seen stats or data for living donors.

There is a website www.unos.org
which stands for United Network for Organ Sharing.
You can select Data from their menu and a drop down box will appear. Select View Data Reports.
Click on the link called National Data. The OPTN
(Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network) site comes up. On this page, Choose Category: Survival, Choose Organ: Kidney, Choose Survival Type: Patient and then click on the link Survial by Recipient (Blood Type/ Ethnicity/ Age/ Gender/ etc.) Your category, organ and survival type can be set at what you want. This is an example of how to bring up the survival data. If you click on ethnicity, you can view the Post Transplant Years for White, Black, Hispanic and Asian people, the Number Functioning/Alive, their Survival Rate and more.

I hope this helps someone. Thanks LivingDonor101 for your comment.

And for the reader's information: No, there is no cure to a lot of diseases but you have to realize that there is no money to be made in CURES, only money to be made in MEDICATIONS. Sad, very sad.
rebecca22

Asheville, NC

#6 Jun 26, 2011
I'm Mark's daughter.. and while I understand every one is entitled to their own opinions. LivingDonor, when it's YOUR dad, it's a little different. I couldn't possibly imagine what it would be like for him not to be here. He wouldn't ask, if he didn't need it. I still need him, at 22 years old, i'll always need him. He, thank the sweet Lord, got a kidney in February 2011. His donor died. I'm so very sorry for their loss, but I cannot express how greatful I am for their gift. I understand it isn't a cure. My heart use to stop everytime I got a call from his number, wondering if THIS was the call that was telling me he was gone, his kidneys had finally stopped working. Try considering it from my point of view, before you say he should consider what he's asking for. He's asking for a chance to be around for his twin daughters, son, and his widowed mother.

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