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GetAClue

Ithaca, NY

#61 Feb 13, 2012
Opine wrote:
<quoted text>
Great googling there bro.
The poster said "stomach pain" assumed another stone, and moseyed on into the ER for a looksee.
Doesn't sound like an obtructing septic (high fever, vomiting, sweating balls, gray pallor, weak, thready pulse, dizzy, and delirious) presentation to me and the VAST majority of stones are passed with discomfort, on their own, not usually 4+ millimeter obtructing calculi.
If chronic Stoners were scanned every time, they'd have nuclear induced leukemia before middle age.
Its called "the big picture" and treating appropriately, sometimes going above and beyond in medicine is harmful.
Like people who whine about not getting antibiotics for viruses:
The reason we now have antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria.
You just don't seem to get it do you. Your entire solution to this problem that you've articulately pointed out is to assume everyone has a mild case and to send them home for basic treatment regimes. That's just not good medicine. It's techniques like this that leave one open for errors and missed diagnostics.
GetAClue

Ithaca, NY

#62 Feb 13, 2012
Opine wrote:
<quoted text>
But f the test is NEGATIVE and the incidence is RARE, then it is legally, ethically, and morally safe to assume the kid ate too many fruit loops or beets.
There's also another saying in medicine, first do the patient no harm and also 'where there is smoke there is fire.' It depends on what side of the fence you are on.

You can sit and spout all of the medical knowledge and 50 cent scenarios you want, however it comes down to the basic principle of an emergent condition: the patient is seeking help for something, and if it's brought them to the emergency room there is usually a pretty good reason - and it's by no means safe to assume they're there for nefarious reasons.
GetAClue

Ithaca, NY

#63 Feb 13, 2012
Opine wrote:
<quoted text>
Great googling there bro.
The poster said "stomach pain" assumed another stone, and moseyed on into the ER for a looksee.
[/quote]
I'm not your bro. I'm a licensed healthcare professional in the state of NY who currently practices in an acute setting. I didn't have to 'google' anything. It's basic knowledge of stone formation, signs and pathophysiology, and experience with patients who are suffering from renal calculi both acute and chronic.

[QUOTE who="Opine"]<quot ed text>
Doesn't sound like an obtructing septic (high fever, vomiting, sweating balls, gray pallor, weak, thready pulse, dizzy, and delirious) presentation to me and the VAST majority of stones are passed with discomfort, on their own, not usually 4+ millimeter obtructing calculi.
[/quote]

An obstruction can sometimes be asymptomatic. Sepsis, also, can be asymptomatic. And while you are right by saying a vast majority of stones are passed with discomfort on their own, again it is unwise to make an assumption that every clinical presentation will have the same outcome.

[QUOTE who="Opine"]<quot ed text>
If chronic Stoners were scanned every time, they'd have nuclear induced leukemia before middle age.
[/quote]

Which is exactly why patients with chronic kidney stones are subjected to urinalysis for detection of blood in the urine for subsequent diagnosis.

[QUOTE who="Opine"]<quot ed text>
Its called "the big picture" and treating appropriately, sometimes going above and beyond in medicine is harmful.
Like people who whine about not getting antibiotics for viruses:
The reason we now have antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria.
So your solution to this problem is conservative treatment and minimal medical investigation is warranted at all times. It's either black or white for you, isn't it.

And I agree. Antibiotics are overused and should be only given following a positive identification of a pathogen that can be treated by antibiotics.
GetAClue

Ithaca, NY

#64 Feb 13, 2012
Gosh darn it. I guess you can't do multiple quotes in one message.

I'm not your bro. I'm a licensed healthcare professional in the state of NY who currently practices in an acute setting. I didn't have to 'google' anything. It's basic knowledge of stone formation, signs and pathophysiology, and experience with patients who are suffering from renal calculi both acute and chronic. An obstruction can sometimes be asymptomatic. Sepsis, also, can be asymptomatic. And while you are right by saying a vast majority of stones are passed with discomfort on their own, again it is unwise to make an assumption that every clinical presentation will have the same outcome. Chronic CT scans can in fact be detrimental to ones health and in the case of chronic renal calculi formation a urinalysis to screen for blood is usually the first line of defense.

And finally Opine: Your solution to this problem is conservative treatment and minimal medical investigation is warranted at all times. It's either black or white for you, isn't it.

And I agree. Antibiotics are overused and should be only given following a positive identification of a pathogen that can be treated by antibiotics. "
GetAClue

Ithaca, NY

#65 Feb 13, 2012
In the end everybody; I think the moral of the story is to seek treatment from your family physician, and if you feel that the situation is emergent, go to the ER for further evaluation. It's better to be safe than sorry. You shouldn't feel guilty or persuaded not to seek care at a public hospital or receive attention from public servants because your 'case isn't an emergency'. That's what we're here for. To help _YOU_... not ourselves.
frctyresident

Syracuse, NY

#66 Feb 13, 2012
what about the girl in the er that takes all the info? she dresses like she is going out to a bar and not in a hospital setting, always texting no her phone, pathetic is what i say. maybe the big bosses should check out the er staff after hours.
hmmmmmm

New York, NY

#67 Mar 6, 2012
Upset wrote:
<quoted text>
if you could answer that i would greatly appreciate it. it is because we have child health plus, and AHMC wants to bill them more through the ER - this is all I can come up with
Has nothing to do with that whatsoever...Child Health Plus will not cover a "clinic" visit because the dr is not your primary dr. In order to be seen at any clinic. AHMC or Mountain Medical you would have to change your primary over to their provider. And if you were to do that you cannot switch it back for 30 days. Has nothing to do with more billing through the ER, get your facts straight....

Since: Sep 08

Silver Spring, MD

#68 Mar 6, 2012
I wonder how many contractors work at the hospital.
I'm not talking about temp worker like construction. People who work at the hospital everyday, thy look like hospital employees, doing the same work, but get their pay ck from someplace else.

xd
disgustedhospita lworker

Tully, NY

#69 Mar 6, 2012
catfish jack wrote:
<quoted text>
If you had a severe infection...this was coming for a while...see your dcotor instead of clogging up the ER....it is for life emergencies not routine care
You should not put anyone down for clogging up the ER. A severe infection could be very serious. I myself would have chosen a different hospital though...
disgustedhospita lworker

Tully, NY

#70 Mar 6, 2012
Malonian wrote:
I think it's kind of creepy that some of these posts have been marked as spam! Do the people that have voted these posts this way work in the hospital? Would you rather we talk about nonsensical things like xdrunk and max? Really? This is a ''nutty' post?
Get a job.
I work there now. I have seen it all first hand....It is horrible and dirty there.
Thank You

Syracuse, NY

#71 Mar 6, 2012
catfish jack wrote:
<quoted text>
If you had a severe infection...this was coming for a while...see your dcotor instead of clogging up the ER....it is for life emergencies not routine care
Yes! Too many people hot foot it to the ER just because of one little thing or the other. So many times people show up there for some ailment that they've had for days and now want medicine for. Or they had a minor accident that a band aid would have taken care of. Or they have a belly ache or a head ache or whatever. My daughter works as a PA at CVPH and tells me you wouldn't believe the bleeding hearts that take the time away from TRUE emergencies. But I told her I do. I've been to the Alice Hyde ER myself.
Get a life people. EVERYTHING IS NOT AN EMERGENCY. Learn some basic First Aid. What's worse is so many of these people are on welfare or some other form of payment derived from tax payers. And don't tell me they're not. THey're the worst according to my daughter. Maybe if people had to actually PAY for the service, they'd think twice about using it. I'm not saying to NOT use the ER if you need it, just use your head about it.
really?

Orange, CA

#72 Mar 6, 2012
disgustedhospitalworker wrote:
<quoted text>I work there now. I have seen it all first hand....It is horrible and dirty there.
if its that bad....why are you still working there?
Yup

Adams Center, NY

#73 Mar 6, 2012
It's too bad Yup Malone has always been too lazy to work - he would fit in great as an employee of the ER!

LOL!
yeah sure

Syracuse, NY

#74 Mar 6, 2012
disgustedhospitalworker wrote:
<quoted text>I work there now. I have seen it all first hand....It is horrible and dirty there.
Yeah. Like we believe this. Tell us another story.
disgustedhospita lworker

Tully, NY

#75 Mar 9, 2012
[QUOTE who="really?"]<qu oted text>
if its that bad....why are you still working there?[/QUOTE] Actually I just quit working there lol....funny you said that
disgustedhospita lworker

Tully, NY

#76 Mar 9, 2012
Love alice hyde just love it.....gaggy hole
justme

Watervliet, NY

#77 Sep 27, 2012
yeah sure wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah. Like we believe this. Tell us another story.
what would you like to know?
banana split

New York, NY

#78 Sep 27, 2012
Thank You wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes! Too many people hot foot it to the ER just because of one little thing or the other. So many times people show up there for some ailment that they've had for days and now want medicine for. Or they had a minor accident that a band aid would have taken care of. Or they have a belly ache or a head ache or whatever. My daughter works as a PA at CVPH and tells me you wouldn't believe the bleeding hearts that take the time away from TRUE emergencies. But I told her I do. I've been to the Alice Hyde ER myself.
Get a life people. EVERYTHING IS NOT AN EMERGENCY. Learn some basic First Aid. What's worse is so many of these people are on welfare or some other form of payment derived from tax payers. And don't tell me they're not. THey're the worst according to my daughter. Maybe if people had to actually PAY for the service, they'd think twice about using it. I'm not saying to NOT use the ER if you need it, just use your head about it.
There is so many truths in this statement. Luckily we now have Mountain Medical in Malone which does not accept welfare. It is so nice not to have to deal with the welfare drama and ignorance when you are sick and need to see a doctor.

Since: Sep 12

New York, NY

#79 Sep 27, 2012
catfish jack wrote:
<quoted text>
If you had a severe infection...this was coming for a while...see your dcotor instead of clogging up the ER....it is for life emergencies not routine care
infections be life threatening

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