Health Plan For Prisoners -- Courant.com

Health Plan For Prisoners -- Courant.com

There are 29 comments on the Hartford Courant story from Oct 14, 2007, titled Health Plan For Prisoners -- Courant.com. In it, Hartford Courant reports that:

Connecticut's struggle to shoehorn more inmates into an already crowded prison system is part of a national crisis that cannot be ignored.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Hartford Courant.

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john h

Hartford, CT

#2 Oct 15, 2007
The mentally-ill would not be in prison, at least not in the current numbers, if they had better access to health care in the first place. Better access to rehabilitation services would reduce the numbers of drug-related offenders. We spend too much money on the back end of these problems because we choose not to sepnd it on the front end, although that would be cheaper, less disruptive of society and more humane.
Obfuscator

United States

#3 Oct 15, 2007
What's missing here is that some prosecutors, judges, probation and parole officers--not to mention legislators, police officers and sherriff's deputies--are themselves "mentally ill," with or without a diagnosis. They are never locked up, even when they commit crimes because they are "above the law." That's you Jodi, Bloomy and Mike Lawless.

The system cannot be "improved." It must be overhauled from top to bottom by a reasonable and disinterested citizenry, operating in an historical context without hysteria. Too many players with too many debts owed to too many special interests, too much ignorance, too little adherence to common law, the Constitution and the enlightened intentions of the Founding Fathers.

Corrupticut, the Unconstitution State, a state in Denial. Between a rock and a hard place, Ct. will not improve in my lifetime. The whole world is watching,... and laughing at your hubris. Otherwise a timely editorial.

Since: Apr 07

Location hidden

#4 Oct 15, 2007
Again, what are the definitions or parameters used to define "mental illness"? Do they consider OCD a mental illness? Sociopathy? Substance abuse? Before we start getting bent out of shape over the statistics, the Courant and the readers should know this committees defining parameters.

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#5 Oct 15, 2007
john h wrote:
The mentally-ill would not be in prison, at least not in the current numbers, if they had better access to health care in the first place. Better access to rehabilitation services would reduce the numbers of drug-related offenders. We spend too much money on the back end of these problems because we choose not to sepnd it on the front end, although that would be cheaper, less disruptive of society and more humane.
Exactly.

And the main reason that addicts do not have good access to health care is because most doctors still believe that addiction is a moral and criminal problem, not a health problem.
frankie

United States

#6 Oct 16, 2007
Honestly, you have no idea what "the main reason is" nor do you have any factual evidence to support your opinion that this is what "most doctors" believe. Doctors do not control access to care or put up the barriers.

Also your use of language reveals your need to categorize and label people. It's not "the mentally ill", "the poor", or "addicts". Try "people with mental illness" "people with addictions" or "people with low incomes". You make it sound like you are Mother Theresa acknowledging the great unwashed. Of course you are fre to express yourself however you like to.

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#7 Oct 16, 2007
frankie wrote:
Honestly, you have no idea what "the main reason is" nor do you have any factual evidence to support your opinion that this is what "most doctors" believe. Doctors do not control access to care or put up the barriers.
Also your use of language reveals your need to categorize and label people. It's not "the mentally ill", "the poor", or "addicts". Try "people with mental illness" "people with addictions" or "people with low incomes". You make it sound like you are Mother Theresa acknowledging the great unwashed. Of course you are fre to express yourself however you like to.
Frankie,

Then who controls access to care or puts up the barriers?

QUOTE:

From "Addiction is a Disease, Not a Moral Failing"

"Despite the fact that it was long ago acknowledged that alcohol and drug dependency are diseases (the AMA accepted this a quarter of a century ago), the everyday world of medical practice often reflects the stigmatizing attitudes of medical personnel reported in Angel's story."

Source:
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerende...

QUOTE:
From "Stimga"

"The 1999 report on mental health by the Surgeon General of the United States was regarded as a landmark document in the United Kingdom, as well as the United States. This was because of its straightforward identification of the stigma associated with mental illness as the chief obstacle to effective treatment of persons with mental disorders. Stigma(plural, stigmata) is a Greek word that in its origins referred to a kind of tattoo mark that was cut or burned into the skin of criminals, slaves, or traitors in order to visibly identify them as blemished or morally polluted persons. These individuals were to be avoided or shunned, particularly in public places. The word was later applied to other personal attributes that are considered shameful or discrediting."

Source:
http://www.minddisorders.com/Py-Z/Stigma.html

And YES, I have honestly talked to doctors and dentists and oncologists and hematologists and radiologists and neurologists from Connecticut and New York City who have ALL told me that they think that addiction is a CRIMINAL problem, NOT a health problem, and that they do not LIKE to treat criminals and that no one can FORCE them to help anyone they don't want to help.

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#8 Oct 16, 2007
Oh and I forgot the best one....psychiatrists.

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#9 Oct 16, 2007
Or rather, people who practice psychiatry.
Gloria CT-Expatriate

Phoenix, AZ

#10 Oct 16, 2007
Alcoholism is not a disease. Obesity is not a disease. Excessive gambling is not a disease. Sticking a dirty needle full of heroin into ones scarred arm is not a disease A ravenous desire for chunky peanut butter is not a disease. They are a combination of addiction, weakness of will, moral laxity, or any similar self-destructive predilection. These ‘diseases’ are a direct result of people making deliberate bad choices, and then expecting the rest of society to sympathize, coddle and treat them at our expense. It’s sickening that these people are subsidized by bleeding hearts, and certainly by the taxes of decent people who have made the right choices. Prisons should provide the minimum medical care to inmates and not waste excess taxpayer dollars on b-s treatments - we pay enough to keep the dregs away from us.
Get Real

East Granby, CT

#11 Oct 16, 2007
BS...many drug offenders end up in prison vs. dying on the street...the first offenders get ordered into rehab as a condition of release. Rehab only works for those who truly want it to. No-it's not easy...but to blame everyone els eincluding the healthcare system and those who work in it, is just plain ludicrous.

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#12 Oct 16, 2007
Gloria CT-Expatriate wrote:
Alcoholism is not a disease. Obesity is not a disease. Excessive gambling is not a disease. Sticking a dirty needle full of heroin into ones scarred arm is not a disease A ravenous desire for chunky peanut butter is not a disease. They are a combination of addiction, weakness of will, moral laxity, or any similar self-destructive predilection. These ‘diseases’ are a direct result of people making deliberate bad choices, and then expecting the rest of society to sympathize, coddle and treat them at our expense. It’s sickening that these people are subsidized by bleeding hearts, and certainly by the taxes of decent people who have made the right choices. Prisons should provide the minimum medical care to inmates and not waste excess taxpayer dollars on b-s treatments - we pay enough to keep the dregs away from us.
Well then I would consider addiction, obesity, gambling, and a ravenous desire for chunky peanut butter to be non-violent "crimes" in need of more creative punishments than locking them up all up in jail.

At this rate, then entire state of Connecticut will be locked up before you know it.

We can't just keep locking up people for not being perfect. There is beauty in our imperfections too you know.

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#13 Oct 16, 2007
Get Real wrote:
BS...many drug offenders end up in prison vs. dying on the street...the first offenders get ordered into rehab as a condition of release. Rehab only works for those who truly want it to. No-it's not easy...but to blame everyone els eincluding the healthcare system and those who work in it, is just plain ludicrous.
Another QUOTE from the above article:

"Individual clinicians can have a great impact on substance abuse through their role in identifying, treating, and preventing the disease. A review of 44 studies of brief interventions in healthcare settings showed that even brief interactions with medical personnel have significant effects on patients' drinking. The vulnerability of a patient in a medical encounter and the authority of the medical provider can be harnessed for the immediate and long-term benefit of the patient, whatever the level of severity of substance misuse."
Get Real

East Granby, CT

#14 Oct 16, 2007
Dana Herbert wrote:
<quoted text>
Well then I would consider addiction, obesity, gambling, and a ravenous desire for chunky peanut butter to be non-violent "crimes" in need of more creative punishments than locking them up all up in jail.
At this rate, then entire state of Connecticut will be locked up before you know it.
We can't just keep locking up people for not being perfect. There is beauty in our
imperfections too you know.
How many real addicts do you know that have not committed some crime against others?
So, if an addict needs money, we can send them to your place to steal whatever stuff might get them another fx?
High School Parent

South Windsor, CT

#15 Oct 16, 2007
Gloria CT-Expatriate wrote:
Alcoholism is not a disease. Obesity is not a disease. Excessive gambling is not a disease. Sticking a dirty needle full of heroin into ones scarred arm is not a disease A ravenous desire for chunky peanut butter is not a disease. They are a combination of addiction, weakness of will, moral laxity, or any similar self-destructive predilection. These ‘diseases’ are a direct result of people making deliberate bad choices, and then expecting the rest of society to sympathize, coddle and treat them at our expense. It’s sickening that these people are subsidized by bleeding hearts, and certainly by the taxes of decent people who have made the right choices. Prisons should provide the minimum medical care to inmates and not waste excess taxpayer dollars on b-s treatments - we pay enough to keep the dregs away from us.
I agree 100%. I never have and never will believe in alcoholism being a disease. And furthermore, we need to provide health care for all the american LAW ABIDING citizens, before we provide for those low lives in prison. It's pretty ironic that you need to be a criminal to be considered for health care and law abiding citizens that struggle and those working hard cant afford it. Pretty pathetic if you ask me. This country and state needs to get its priorities straight. Let the addicts dry out cold turkey. They deserve it.
Get Real

East Granby, CT

#16 Oct 16, 2007
Dana Herbert wrote:
<quoted text>
Another QUOTE from the above article:
"Individual clinicians can have a great impact on substance abuse through their role in identifying, treating, and preventing the disease. A review of 44 studies of brief interventions in healthcare settings showed that even brief interactions with medical personnel have significant effects on patients' drinking. The vulnerability of a patient in a medical encounter and the authority of the medical provider can be harnessed for the immediate and long-term benefit of the patient, whatever the level of severity of substance misuse."
What a crock.

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#17 Oct 16, 2007
Get Real wrote:
<quoted text>
What a crock.
Beautiful.

Since: Apr 07

Location hidden

#18 Oct 17, 2007
High School Parent wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree 100%. I never have and never will believe in alcoholism being a disease. And furthermore, we need to provide health care for all the american LAW ABIDING citizens, before we provide for those low lives in prison. It's pretty ironic that you need to be a criminal to be considered for health care and law abiding citizens that struggle and those working hard cant afford it. Pretty pathetic if you ask me. This country and state needs to get its priorities straight. Let the addicts dry out cold turkey. They deserve it.
Addiction is a disease. The key component of it's individual cure is a willing participant. The problem is that most that occupy detox centers don't want to participate. They are there by order of courts to avoid prison. They are there to keep warm, they are there to socialize with others of the same lifestyle.
Look at the joke they call methadone maintenance where people are on this drug for YEARS. Why not methadone detox?? Why not wean people from heroin rather than maintain their use at their existing levels? Aside from keeping detox centers in business and people employed there their successes are few and far between. Do these minimal successes rationalize the millions in government and insurance funds spent yearly?
High School Parent

South Windsor, CT

#19 Oct 17, 2007
Middletown Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
Addiction is a disease. The key component of it's individual cure is a willing participant. The problem is that most that occupy detox centers don't want to participate. They are there by order of courts to avoid prison. They are there to keep warm, they are there to socialize with others of the same lifestyle.
Look at the joke they call methadone maintenance where people are on this drug for YEARS. Why not methadone detox?? Why not wean people from heroin rather than maintain their use at their existing levels? Aside from keeping detox centers in business and people employed there their successes are few and far between. Do these minimal successes rationalize the millions in government and insurance funds spent yearly?
I still dont condone it as a disease. I know many people do, I dont. Its all voluntary and was not forced into their bodies. They werent born with it. However, I agree with what you said about
trying to wean them off rather than keep them on it. Personally, I think cold turkey is best. I dont feel sorry for drug addicts.
Francis

United States

#20 Oct 17, 2007
DSM 297.1
Bootboyrick

United States

#21 Oct 17, 2007
How come prisoners can have a health plan and not me? Me who has worked all his life. Never got into trouble, never gone to jail, obey all the laws and i get screwed. Of course i'm sure a lot of us must feel the same way. Pretty soon the prisoners will want their a--'s wiped. Prisoners have more rights than regular Americans. That shouldn't be the way.

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