Is this an expression?
Kat

Jackson, MS

#1 Mar 12, 2011
"I never liked the taste of crow, but baby I ate it."

Or is it just random lyrics in a song?

“John 3:16”

Since: Sep 09

Location hidden

#2 Mar 12, 2011
Never heard of it.
lala

United States

#3 Mar 13, 2011
Yea it's An expression.. It means I didn't like it but I did it anyway.. Kinda like saying you'll never do something then b the first one to do it & saying "I ate my words on barbed wire bread" means it was tough to admit you did something you said you wouldn't do.. I know I said it the day I spanked my first son bc I said I'd never spank my kids
Alyssa

Amsterdam, NY

#4 Jul 23, 2012
Its also a lyric to the song you lie by the band perry

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#5 Jul 24, 2012
From Wikipedia:

Literally eating a crow is traditionally seen as being distasteful; the crow is one of the birds listed in Leviticus chapter 11 [4] as being unfit for eating. Scavenging carrion eaters have a long association with the battlefield, "They left the corpses behind for the raven, never was there greater slaughter in this island," says the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Along with buzzards, rats, and other carrion-eating scavenging animals, there is a tradition in Western culture going back to at least the Middle Ages of seeing them as distasteful (even illegal at times) to eat,[5] and thus naturally humiliating if forced to consume against one's will.[2]

In the modern idiomatic sense of being proven wrong, eating crow probably first appeared in print in 1850, as an American humor piece about a rube farmer near Lake Mahopack, New York.[3] The OED V2 says the story was first published as "Eating Crow" in San Francisco's Daily Evening Picayune (Dec. 3, 1851),[1] but two other early versions exist, one in The Knickerbocker (date unknown),[3] and one in the Saturday Evening Post (Nov. 2, 1850) called "Can You Eat Crow?".[3] All tell a similar story: a slow-witted New York farmer is outfoxed by his (presumed urban)[3] boarders; after they complain about the poor food being served, the farmer discounts the complaint by claiming he "kin eat anything", and the boarders wonder if he can eat a crow. "I kin eat a crow!", the farmer says. The boarders take him up on the challenge but also secretly spike the crow with Scotch snuff. The story ends with the farmer saying: "I kin eat a crow, but I be darned if I hanker after it."

Since: Apr 09

Location hidden

#6 Jul 24, 2012
LoosedAlien wrote:
From Wikipedia:
Literally eating a crow is traditionally seen as being distasteful; the crow is one of the birds listed in Leviticus chapter 11 [4] as being unfit for eating. Scavenging carrion eaters have a long association with the battlefield, "They left the corpses behind for the raven, never was there greater slaughter in this island," says the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Along with buzzards, rats, and other carrion-eating scavenging animals, there is a tradition in Western culture going back to at least the Middle Ages of seeing them as distasteful (even illegal at times) to eat,[5] and thus naturally humiliating if forced to consume against one's will.[2]
In the modern idiomatic sense of being proven wrong, eating crow probably first appeared in print in 1850, as an American humor piece about a rube farmer near Lake Mahopack, New York.[3] The OED V2 says the story was first published as "Eating Crow" in San Francisco's Daily Evening Picayune (Dec. 3, 1851),[1] but two other early versions exist, one in The Knickerbocker (date unknown),[3] and one in the Saturday Evening Post (Nov. 2, 1850) called "Can You Eat Crow?".[3] All tell a similar story: a slow-witted New York farmer is outfoxed by his (presumed urban)[3] boarders; after they complain about the poor food being served, the farmer discounts the complaint by claiming he "kin eat anything", and the boarders wonder if he can eat a crow. "I kin eat a crow!", the farmer says. The boarders take him up on the challenge but also secretly spike the crow with Scotch snuff. The story ends with the farmer saying: "I kin eat a crow, but I be darned if I hanker after it."
Not to be rude but what does that post have to do with the original question?

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#7 Jul 25, 2012
mentul_autocrat wrote:
<quoted text> Not to be rude but what does that post have to do with the original question?
Also not to be rude, but did you read it? Or are you just checking to make sure it is relevant before comitting the time? It is about the expression EATING CROW, which is EXACTLY what the original post was about.

_N0_N33D_T0_T33L _

Since: Apr 09

Location hidden

#8 Jul 25, 2012
The phrase 'eating crow' means that you had to admit you were wrong

Since: Apr 09

Location hidden

#9 Jul 25, 2012
LoosedAlien wrote:
<quoted text>
Also not to be rude, but did you read it? Or are you just checking to make sure it is relevant before comitting the time? It is about the expression EATING CROW, which is EXACTLY what the original post was about.
"I never liked the taste of crow, but baby I ate it." Was the original post, it does contain the words eating crow but also say's baby I liked it. I believe those are lyrics to a song. I did find you're post interesting though, I have heard the phrase but never knew where it originated.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#10 Jul 26, 2012
OK...I guess if you didn't know the expression "Eating Crow", it would seem like I answered a different question, but since I knew the phrase and it was obvious to me that the lyrics were based on the phrase, my reply made sense to me. Glad we managed to figure that one out.
Hello1

Denver, CO

#11 Sep 11, 2013
mentul_autocrat wrote:
<quoted text> "I never liked the taste of crow, but baby I ate it." Was the original post, it does contain the words eating crow but also say's baby I liked it. I believe those are lyrics to a song. I did find you're post interesting though, I have heard the phrase but never knew where it originated.
That song does NOT say, baby I liked it, whatsoever. Go listen to it.

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