John Switzer commentary: Johnny Apple...

John Switzer commentary: Johnny Appleseed sheltered winter amid warmth of many loved ones | The C...

There are 10 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Jan 16, 2011, titled John Switzer commentary: Johnny Appleseed sheltered winter amid warmth of many loved ones | The C.... In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

Johnny Appleseed was a man without a hearth or home. He was basically a man of the woods, cooking his vegetarian meals over an open fire.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Columbus Dispatch.

You had good ideas

Roy, WA

#1 Jan 16, 2011
If colorful Johnny lived now he would be considered a "hippie-type"--free

spirited, come-a-you-please...happy...no 9-5...no house payments...no

nagging to listen to...living in a van down by the river. Society doesn't like

those types now...nose to the grindstone..be productive...die from stress

& high taxes before you're 60. Thanks Johnny for showing us there's other

ways to experience & enjoy life.... and I love apple pie.

Alternative Seeker
You Never Know

Cambridge, OH

#2 Jan 16, 2011
Then again he might be a botanist with a PhD trying to improve apple quality through genetic manipulation of apple tree dna.

You just never know.
hamburger pimp

United States

#3 Jan 16, 2011
You had good ideas wrote:
If colorful Johnny lived now he would be considered a "hippie-type"--free
spirited, come-a-you-please...happy...no 9-5...no house payments...no
nagging to listen to...living in a van down by the river. Society doesn't like
those types now...nose to the grindstone..be productive...die from stress
& high taxes before you're 60. Thanks Johnny for showing us there's other
ways to experience & enjoy life.... and I love apple pie.
Alternative Seeker
Those are good ideas, they just haven't been viable for most Americans since the early 70's. besides, you sound like a dangerous Tea Party member with that crack about high taxes. Turn yourself in to DHS immediately.
Traditions modified

Roy, WA

#4 Jan 16, 2011
I've updated Johnny's work, but I plant marihuana instead of apples. I plant in forrests, my neighbor's yard...everywhere I go...la-la-la. Now
I'm working on cross-breeding apples & weed. What a combo. It would be like Mrs. Smith Pies meet Zig Zag rolling papers. What a great country...what great ideas.
Lynn144

Reynoldsburg, OH

#5 Jan 16, 2011
Yes was aware he died in Indiana...growing up in Fort Wayne his grave is there and kept up nice by the city so always good to hear stories of him and his life.
Marilyn Horne

Carlsbad, CA

#6 Jan 16, 2011
Johnny Appleseed would never have gone for the genetically modified monstrousities of today. Only one good way to modify a variety and that is to crossbreed them as nature intended.
Paved the way

Wooster, OH

#7 Jan 16, 2011
I love hearing about him. The importance of Johnny Appleseed's work is often overlooked. Without the apple as a staple, settling the interior of the Ohio country would have been far more difficult.
Will Burns

Twin Lakes, WI

#8 Jan 16, 2011
Traditions modified wrote:
I've updated Johnny's work, but I plant marihuana instead of apples. I plant in forrests, my neighbor's yard...everywhere I go...la-la-la. Now
I'm working on cross-breeding apples & weed. What a combo. It would be like Mrs. Smith Pies meet Zig Zag rolling papers. What a great country...what great ideas.
I don't care if plant weed, but could you stop leaving those plastic gallon jugs laying around. Oh leave my licorice and ramps alone too.
UU for Life Graduate

Chillicothe, OH

#9 Jan 16, 2011
The article should have also stated that his real name was John Chapman and, along with spreading apple seeds and trees throughout the region, he also was a follower of the Swedenborg religion which also founded Urbana University in 1850. I can recall eating aples from a "Johnny Appleseed" tree. They were never the well formed apples we all prefer seeing today but they were excellent to eat from the tree and for baking. A combination most apples cannot match today.
Don Muenz

Columbus, OH

#10 Jan 17, 2011
Hi, John.
I love reading your column.
We live one block south of Graceland Shopping Center, near Morse Road and North High Street.
Today, I got the surprise of the winter in my backyard.
I was looking out to check our two tube thistle feeders, when I saw motion beneath them. We had a hawk making a meal of a squirrel!
Last year, we had a hawk hanging around our thistle feeder and seed feeders in the backyard, but this is the first time I have ever seen one that close.
We have two small dogs who will not be going out in the backyard until spring.
Any thoughts on how to shoosh the hawk away and still be able to feed the hungry birds? The hawk has taken up residence, high in a fifty-year-old Austrian pine in our backyard.
Thank you, John.

Don

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