Nora Aunor is "All Time Greatest Arti...
meng

Saudi Arabia

#786 Dec 2, 2008
misslanie wrote:
<quoted text>
Class act ang mga anak ni Ate Guy! Kaya pala top rated ang show na yan eh...si Ate Guy ang favorite topic! Ang guapo naman ng Kenneth! Hi Carmelo!!!! Sama ako sa yo manood ng concert puede?
Ang nakaka-touch ay habang pinapanood mo yung show atnag-aantay isasagot o habang nag-e-explain si Matet, naka-close-up and dalawang magkapatid sa screen as in hinati ang screen para i-close-up and Matet and Kenneth. Ang napansin ko kay Kenneth ay parang seryosong seryoso ang bata at nag-i-smile siya kapag ipinagtatanggol ni Matet ang Nanay nila.
meng

Saudi Arabia

#787 Dec 2, 2008
Carmelo wrote:
Ang treatment ni Nora sa mga anak niya is different from the conventional way but just the same pareho ang suma. Lalabas pa rin kung ano ang itinuro niya sa mga kids niya.
Ang gusto ni Nora ay lumaki rin silang responsible adult later on. And I see this with Matet, Lot Lot, Kenneth, Kiko and Ian. If you will observe these kids, they are united to take care of each other, and always ready to defend their mom in any given situation. Same thing with Nora.
Yan ang tinatawag na pagmamahal kahit malayo sa isa't isa!
The mere fact na alam nating lahat na adopted kids ni Nora sina Lotlot, Matet, Kiko at Kenneth, these beautiful kids ay talagang sobra-sobra sa pagdadala kung papaano nila iginagalang at minamahal ang kanilang kinikilalang Nanay na si Nora Aunor. Hindi lang sa showbiz central napatunayan na talagang mababait na mga bata ang mga anak ni Nora kundi maraming beses na natin ito nakita sa TV at nabasa sa mga pahayagan.
meng

Saudi Arabia

#788 Dec 2, 2008
When writers talk of great performers, it is common to draw from samples of excellence and not from the regular and the ordinary. I take pride, therefore, in my find: Nora Aunor in a work that is scarcely remembered.

Fe, Esperanza, Caridad is a trilogy created by Premiere Productions of the Santiagos. It engaged the services of two giant filmmakers, Lamberto Avellana and Gerardo “Gerry” de Leon. The film was released in 1974, two years before Minsa’y Isang Gamu-Gamo, a film that presaged the power of Aunor in crafting characters in themes that are nothing but incendiary. Officially, if there is such a thing, Aunor was not yet acknowledged as an actress because it would be two years later when the Urian, the nation’s premier body of critics, would honor the actor for her work in Tatlong Taong Walang Diyos.

This can best explain why in the trilogy, the exposures of her leading men are substantial. The three stories are not focused on her. This is good for we see Aunor interacting with other actors, instead of being a nucleus of intensity around which pivot other characters. Aunor would be a physical and metaphorical force later that there was no way but for other actors to play off her energy field. For the students of cinema—and for the fans—this must be one of the last major films of Aunor where directors were not yet in awe of her presence.

The film is interesting on many levels. One curiosity is the presence of two directors who would soon be named National Artists for Film: Avellana, who would be so declared in 1976; and de Leon much belatedly getting it in 1982. The credit for the first story in this omnibus does not appear in my VCD but articles point to Cirio Santiago as the director. Short compared with the other two stories, the first one revolves around Fe, the singer discovered by a talent manager (Dindo Fernando). Fe soon becomes the big star, and then painfully witnesses her manager who is now her husband sink into despondency and booze. Even before the husband dies, yes, you know it already. It’s A Star is Born borrowed up to the last line of Judy Garland:“Hello, everybody. This is Mrs. Norman Maine” to Aunor’s “Ako si Mrs. Artiaga.”
meng

Saudi Arabia

#789 Dec 2, 2008
The second episode gives us a reason to appreciate Avellana’s insight as a filmmaker. Despite his elite background, Avellana had already earned his spurs in fleshing out poverty in the ‘50s, with his Badjao and Anak-Dalita. In Esperanza, Avellana is the antithesis of Brocka for where the latter displays poverty and squalor warts and all, the former takes us to the territory of the “poor” and, without much commentary and with no repulsion at all, shows us where they live.

With Avellana telling the story of this cigarette vendor being wooed by a rich man even as her shy suitor, a jeepney driver, remains loyal, we see a tale of hope told without the ponderous air usually associated with that discourse. There is the subplot of a duplicitous “rich” boy passing on to Esperanza his drug dealing, without our heroine’s knowledge and this becomes, like any subplots, distracting. When the story, however, is on Doming, the driver, and Esperanza with her dreams and ambitions, the episode is a caper. Finely paced, the story has another gem, Rosa Aguirre not too old yet, delivering her lines, crisp and crackling, like the ultimate zarzuelista. Aguirre is sublime as a comedienne here and Aunor does her turn to remind us that the greatest tragediennes are those who can also make you laugh.

Gerry de Leon’s contribution demands a different kind of attention. A master of the gothic, de Leon opts to tell the story of a young nun courted by a gardener who turns out to be the Prince of Darkness himself. There lies the problem and there also swells the possibilities of the third and last story. You can snicker at the bad costume of the devil but your jaw will drop with the first scene—a monastery with nuns walking with candles. Headily theatrical, the scene generates for us the impression that the filmmaker knows this dark subject matter in both its camp and compelling incarnations.

Rakishly handsome, Ronaldo Valdez channels for the most part the long ancestral line of Judases and Lucifers and archvillains created for the Filipino silver screen and radio, from Ben David to Ramon D’Salva, from Johnny Monteiro to Paquito Diaz. The story seems to be built around him and, yet, it is when he is with Aunor, in dialogues that defy the apocryphal and the logical, that we get a truly original sense of evil, one that is deeply touching.

As Caridad, Aunor tries to convince the Devil to return to God. In return for that plea, Caridad will do anything, even jump off the cliff. Uneven because of limitations with the sets, the film soars when de Leon’s skills in mere shifts of the camera axis possess him. There is the shot of the blue skies and the clouds being taunted by the Devil and the camera going down to the ground and scaling above the treetops. There is Aunor at the terrace, the background a silvery blue gray. She is holding a rosary and praying to Virgin Mary there amid the evil lair. It is horrifying proposition: evil is as accessible as good. The realization is clear and troubling and it works because one senses these two actors—Valdez, for all his theatrics; Aunor and her underplaying—believe in the things they are doing.

The same year the omnibus was finished, Gerry de Leon would move on to make a full-length film with the Valdez and Aunor, with Christopher de Leon added for good measure. The film was Banawe. It would be acknowledged as de Leon’s last film. And Aunor’s valedictory to being merely superstar.
Boy Saudi

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

#790 Dec 3, 2008
misslanie wrote:
<quoted text>
Class act ang mga anak ni Ate Guy! Kaya pala top rated ang show na yan eh...si Ate Guy ang favorite topic! Ang guapo naman ng Kenneth! Hi Carmelo!!!! Sama ako sa yo manood ng concert puede?
They all looked refined and well educated. Iyan ba ang sinasabe ng iba na pinabayaan ang mga anak. Ang alam ko pag-pinabayaan mo ang anak mo nagwawala.
Carmelo

San Francisco, CA

#791 Dec 3, 2008
misslanie wrote:
<quoted text>
Class act ang mga anak ni Ate Guy! Kaya pala top rated ang show na yan eh...si Ate Guy ang favorite topic! Ang guapo naman ng Kenneth! Hi Carmelo!!!! Sama ako sa yo manood ng concert puede?
Sige manood tayo ng concert ni AG. I'll let you know, okay.

I have to contact a friend para makasama rin natin siya.

Sana available na ang CD niya at the the concert!
pinoyny77

Shelbyville, IN

#792 Dec 3, 2008
Social Realism and/in Philippine Cinema by Avie Felix Dec 2,'08 10:53 PM
for everyone
“Worst times produce best works.”
- Kidlat Tahimik
September 2007, speech in one of the Friday Film Bar Series
Ishmael Bernal Gallery, UP Diliman
When asked to name the best pinoy films, we often spiel out the titles Manila By Night (1980), Maynila Sa Mga Kuko Ng Liwanag (1975), Batch ’81 (1982), Himala (1982), Tinimbang Ka Ngunit Kulang (1974), Ganito Kami Noon, Paano Kayo Ngayon (1976), Insiang (1976), Oro, Plata, Mata (1980), Minsa’y Isang Gamugamo (1976), and a few others. As a matter of fact, in Nestor Torre’s article entitled Gems of the Filipino Film: A Quest for Excellence, these films were described as “exceptional” and as examples of films that “shed light on the Filipino identity”[1].
A study of Philippine film’s history during the 1970s to early 1980s necessitates a recollection of the socio-political context of the time. The following is a walk-through to that context.
Martial Law
Ferdinand Marcos was inaugurated as president of the Philippines in December 30, 1965.[2] In his inaugural speech he spoke of the many promises and attractive plans he had for the country.
In 1965, the Philippines was considered a “showcase of democracy in Asia”. Elections were consistent and relatively believable. The Congress was functioning well. The judicial system was independent. Many realized that the country’s strength was its democracy. Unfortunately, President Marcos was not one of them.
Economic Situation
Marcos continued the ‘economic liberalization’ policy of his predecessor President Macapagal through hyped-up export endeavors and rigid monitoring of the trade market.
Marcos’ reign paved the way for large-scale infrastructure projects all over the country but those projects were highly dependent on foreign financial assistance. From 1961 (Macapagal’s election) to the end of Marcos’ first term in 1969, the country’s foreign financial obligations rose from $277.7 million to $840.2 million while the country’s debt to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank leaped from $58 million to $286 million[3].
Marcos also geared up agricultural production which proved helpful in sustaining the needs of the country, except that agricultural monopolies were awarded to a handful of hacienderos and business tycoons who had affiliations with the president[4]. Economic policies which heightened export-based endeavors favored the elite, drastically marking up their revenues. On the other hand, the poor failed to experience the economic growth that the government was claiming to have achieved.
Marcos, together with his running mate Fernando Lopez, was re-elected in 1969. He was the first and only Philippine president to be re-elected.[5]
The Military
The presidential proclamation in September 21, 1972 marked the beginning of a more painful suffering of the nation and increased resistance of a people growing in anger. In guise of saving the economy, pacifying violence, and reforming the society, Ferdinand Marcos declared Martial Law. In the constitution, there was no detailed and indicated duration of martial law; the power and decision were in the hands and full control of the president.[6]
Under the martial rule, the administrative role and political authority of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) was expanded. With the empowerment of the AFP, the president was to serve as commander-in-chief. Military strategies were supported by the American government in the form of military supplies provisions, equipment assistance and training programs. Top-of-the-line weapons were imported at the same time that security strategies were intensified.[7] As the military was claiming to impose discipline among the people, curfews and restrictions were implemented.
pinoyny77

Shelbyville, IN

#793 Dec 3, 2008

Social Realism and/in Philippine Cinema by Avie Felix Dec 2,'08 10:53 PM
for everyone

“Worst times produce best works.”

- Kidlat Tahimik

September 2007, speech in one of the Friday Film Bar Series

Ishmael Bernal Gallery, UP Diliman



When asked to name the best pinoy films, we often spiel out the titles Manila By Night (1980), Maynila Sa Mga Kuko Ng Liwanag (1975), Batch ’81 (1982), Himala (1982), Tinimbang Ka Ngunit Kulang (1974), Ganito Kami Noon, Paano Kayo Ngayon (1976), Insiang (1976), Oro, Plata, Mata (1980), Minsa’y Isang Gamugamo (1976), and a few others. As a matter of fact, in Nestor Torre’s article entitled Gems of the Filipino Film: A Quest for Excellence, these films were described as “exceptional” and as examples of films that “shed light on the Filipino identity”[1].

misslanie

Inglewood, CA

#794 Dec 3, 2008
Boy Saudi wrote:
<quoted text>
They all looked refined and well educated. Iyan ba ang sinasabe ng iba na pinabayaan ang mga anak. Ang alam ko pag-pinabayaan mo ang anak mo nagwawala.
Hahahahahaha! Yeah! Some crazy Vilmanian made a comment like that on Youtube and I'm not gonna mention Jhun's name but that was what exactly said in full context! Oh God forgive him!

I really admire those children especially Ate Guy for raising them to become fine and decent men and women . I wish them all the very best and happiness in the world!
meng

Saudi Arabia

#795 Dec 3, 2008
Himala

Himala is a landmark 1982 film directed by Ishmael Bernal. It tells the story of a young woman in a small town in the Philippines who claims to have seen an apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary and suddenly begins to exhibit healing powers. More than a movie about faith-healing, the film is an excellent commentary on Third World poverty and backward and contradictory rural customs. The lead role is superbly played by one of the country's premier dramatic actresses, Nora Aunor.

The film is set in the sleepy, dry town of Cupang (actually shot on location in Ilocos Norte). The locals believe the drought to be a curse placed on them for driving away a leper. However, after Elsa (Nora Aunor) claims to see an apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the sad, forgotten town is consumed with commercialism and exploitation. Elsa mysteriously acquires healing powers and the whole village becomes a bustling venue for mass-produced statues of saints, tours, bottles of miraculous water, and souvenir T-shirts. Hundreds of people come to see her: from overweight matrons in fancy cars to undernourished beggars and countless sick people with diseased and malformed bodies.

There are two subplots. The first is the homecoming of Elsa's close friend (Gigi Dueñas), who is labeled the town's harlot. The second subplot revolves around a cynical film director (Spanky Manikan), who is obssessed with filming Elsa's healing sessions. In the process, he unknowingly films a dark secret about Elsa, which leads to the suicide of her elder sister. Meanwhile, Elsa herself is thoroughly exploited and the course of her life is manipulated beyond her control. The film's most memorable line comes when Elsa finally yells to a crowd of people "Walang himala! Ang himala ay nasa puso ng tao...ang himala ay nasa puso nating lahat!" (There is no miracle! The miracle is in the heart of a person...the miracle is in all our hearts!)

Himala swept the major awards at the Metro Manila Film Festival in 1982 and was accorded the prestige of opening the 1983 Manila International Film Festival under the auspices of then First Lady Imelda Marcos. The film was produced by the Experimental Cinema of the Philippines on a budget of three million pesos, triple the normal amount then for a Tagalog movie.

The film itself won numerous awards, including Best Picture from the 1982 Metro Manila Film Festival and the 1983 Catholic Mass Media Awards. The film's international honors include the Bronze Hugo Prize at the 1983 Chicago International Film Festival. Himala is also the Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino's choice as one of the best films of the 1980s.

Superstar Nora Aunor's role in this movie has been called the best performance of her career. It won her the Best Actress trophy at the Metro Manila Filmfest and was eventually nominated for top acting accolades by all the other award-giving bodies in the country. She almost won the best actress prize at the 1983 Berlin International Film Festival where the film vied for the Golden Bear Award, having been personally handpicked by Festival Director Moritz de Hadeln himself to be part of the official selection.



Reviews

Celebrity, religion, poverty, and fanaticism collide in "Himala", arguably one of the best Filipino films ever made...If you can choose only 1 Filipino film to watch, let it be "Himala".



Himala is a very good film...However, what makes it not only a good film but a great one are the questions it dares to ask. Celebrity, religious hyprocricy and commercialism, poverty, and fanaticism collide in "Himala". In a country overwhelmingly spoon-fed with Catholicism, "Himala" dares to question the institutions and truths we've created and challenges us to do the same.
meng

Saudi Arabia

#796 Dec 3, 2008
Nora Aunor, the best female actors ever to breathe God’s air?

Here is good news we Filipinos (and Noranians alike) can really be proud of: Online voters CNN chose “Himala”(Miracle) as the best Asia-Pacific film in history during the recently concluded Asia Pacific Asia Viewers’ Choice Awards held at the Gold Coast in Queensland, Australia. The 1982 Ishmael Bernal classic, which was a story of a simple provincial girl who claims to be chosen by the Blessed Virgin Mary as a messenger of good faith, turning her into a faith healer in a backward town, bested other masterpieces from other countries like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (China), The Seven Samurai (Japan), Old Boy (South Korea), Pather Panchali (India), Gallipoli (Australia), Infernal Affairs (Hong Kong) and Spirited Away (Japan). According to CNN, voters for the shortlist of the 10 finalists are critics, industry insiders, Asian Film stars and CNN viewers. Online poll was conducted last October. Hmm, could it be that the legions of fans of the Superstar have something to do with this victory as they went online and clicked their votes? And that can be considered a starting point to rejuvenate the waning luster of one of the best female actors ever to breathe God’s air? I say it’s time for her to do a really solid project for her to turn her career around. If you haven’t watched the movie, check out the Youtube clip below and get awed on how her brilliant acting takes those bubble gum-popping shreik-filled actress-wannabes of today to school. Oh, I also scored a trailer.

November 12, 2008 &#8901; http://blournalist. com/2008/ 11/12/cnn- himala-is- best-asia- pacific-film- of-all-time- watch-clip- here/
meng

Saudi Arabia

#797 Dec 3, 2008
Nora Aunor, the best female actors ever to breathe God’s air?

Here is good news we Filipinos (and Noranians alike) can really be proud of: Online voters CNN chose “Himala”(Miracle) as the best Asia-Pacific film in history during the recently concluded Asia Pacific Asia Viewers’ Choice Awards held at the Gold Coast in Queensland, Australia. The 1982 Ishmael Bernal classic, which was a story of a simple provincial girl who claims to be chosen by the Blessed Virgin Mary as a messenger of good faith, turning her into a faith healer in a backward town, bested other masterpieces from other countries like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (China), The Seven Samurai (Japan), Old Boy (South Korea), Pather Panchali (India), Gallipoli (Australia), Infernal Affairs (Hong Kong) and Spirited Away (Japan). According to CNN, voters for the shortlist of the 10 finalists are critics, industry insiders, Asian Film stars and CNN viewers. Online poll was conducted last October. Hmm, could it be that the legions of fans of the Superstar have something to do with this victory as they went online and clicked their votes? And that can be considered a starting point to rejuvenate the waning luster of one of the best female actors ever to breathe God’s air? I say it’s time for her to do a really solid project for her to turn her career around. If you haven’t watched the movie, check out the Youtube clip below and get awed on how her brilliant acting takes those bubble gum-popping shreik-filled actress-wannabes of today to school. Oh, I also scored a trailer.
meng

Saudi Arabia

#798 Dec 3, 2008
Comments on Himala: A Cinematic Achievement In A Time of Cinematic Doldrum
Entertainment News, News & Info
November 13, 2008
http://citizenonmars.blogsome.com/20...matic-...

Nora Aunor’s acting is the highlight of the movie and without it “Himala” would have been entirely mediocre and insignificant.

22 Comments »

indie movies are good nowadays.
Comment by bingskee — November 13, 2008 @ 11:24 pm

I gotta check out “Himala”. If it gains such a prestigious accolade, it must be a real good movie. Thanks for the info.
Comment by bw — November 14, 2008 @ 11:25 pm

Wow… ayan, nacurious tuloy ako. I don’t remember seeing this film…Been watching classic movies lately — watched James Stewart’s “It’s a Wonderful Life” last night (ah, brought tears to my eyes!). Probably the best christmas movie of all time! Oh, how’ve you been, Major Tom? ;-)
Comment by bokbok — November 15, 2008 @ 12:35 am

Himala won? Wow! That makes me happy. I actually voted for “Himala” on the CNN website a few days ago. Nice to know now that it won the CNN award! I think that some — not all — Philippine movies made in the ’70s and ’80s are really good,“Himala” included. I liked one particular film that featured a young Ace Vergel (a story about a man’s relationship with his mom). The title escapes me now…. The script was so good…so natural-sounding. I understand that there are lots of Pinoy indie films being made now. But unfortunately, I haven’t seen any since I’m here in Switzerland.
Comment by Jayred — November 15, 2008 @ 12:40 am

Itim, Insiang and Sister Stella L. are also good ones.
Comment by myepinoy — November 15, 2008 @ 1:39 am

Major Tom, I remember the film now:“Pieta”! Given a chance, I’d like to buy a copy of this film, along with other classic Pinoy films.
Comment by Jayred — November 15, 2008 @ 6:34 pm

To Bingskee: I’ve notice that too ma’am but somehow they can be too unaccessible to the public. I hope our film authorities could remedy this.
Comment by Major Tom — November 16, 2008 @ 2:33 am

To BW: The film is so old and I’ve read how a German film institute had to do some reworking on it. The recent issue I’ve seen on TV had that cleaner look, but the original is a little scratchy.
Comment by Major Tom — November 16, 2008 @ 2:36 am

To bokbok: Nice to hear from you again madame and how’s life over there in France. I am just being fine. I hope you do try seeing this classic movie if it’ll be ever available there. The story itself is so rivetting. Now that you mention it, I might as well try looking out for that James Stewart movie; it must be real good as you said.
Comment by Major Tom — November 16, 2008 @ 2:38 am

To Jayred: I’ve also seen that and do similarly remember how good it was. Actually, after I saw that movie so many years ago, I became a fan of Mr. Ace Vergel, even if as an action star, he wasn’t as popular as some others then. But it was a very strong movie, and very well-acted.
Comment by Major Tom — November 16, 2008 @ 2:41 am
meng

Saudi Arabia

#799 Dec 3, 2008
Comments on Himala: A Cinematic Achievement In A Time of Cinematic Doldrum
Entertainment News, News & Info
November 13, 2008
http://citizenonmars.blogsome.com/20...matic -...

To myepinoy: Oh, they are all good as you mentioned especially Sister Stella L. by the great late director Lino Brocka. It felt so much like a Brian de Palma film, the way he does it in “San Salvador” or like Oliver Stone. Truly, Lino Brocka is so at par with othet great international filmmaker.
Comment by Major Tom — November 16, 2008 @ 2:43 am

Difficult access to local film classics is a huge hindrance. Which is why I support “piracy” of old movies that are worth watching. Capitalists should lay their hands off of the thought of sacking profit by taking advantage of this thirst for the glorious past.
Comment by [splice]— November 16, 2008 @ 1:17 pm

Cool. Good for the makers of Himala’s. I agree there’s probably one too many cheesy love stories in the movies. But I’ve always believed that they’ll keep making them as long as people keep watching them.
Comment by Wil — November 16, 2008 @ 1:54 pm

i didnt know this movie received big awards. i think i have to watch it. i only overhear words like “walang himala” in the past decades.
Comment by dong ho — November 16, 2008 @ 9:57 pm

I haven’t seen this movie yet even though I’ve heard very good things about it. The only reason I avoided in the past was a shallow one: I never liked Nora Aunor. Hehehe. But this movie came from a golden period in Philippine cinema: the 1970s when directors like Brocka, Bernal, Castillo, Cervantes, and O’Hara left their mark on a number of great Filipino movies. Efforts should be made to preserve these movies for future generations.
Comment by Panaderos — November 17, 2008 @ 12:45 am

To Splice: I was at the video rental store and can’t find “Himala” so I think that’ll justify some bootlegging. I’ve heard that ABS-CBN is releasing a DVD copy of it for the public but it’ll be too costly perhaps…
Comment by Major Tom — November 17, 2008 @ 8:51 am

Wil: It’s been that way for ages I bet, it’s human nature I think…
Comment by Major Tom — November 17, 2008 @ 8:52 am

To dong Ho: That has become sort of a huge Filipino euphemism,“Walang Himala!”; that’s how big this movie had been, and even until now, despite that in the beginning the audience would not really appreciate it, sue to the simplicity of production, but as the movie goes on, the story takes hold and becomes riveting and intriguing the most…
Comment by Major Tom — November 17, 2008 @ 8:56 am

To Panaderos: A german film institute in fact had done some preservation on it; they liked it that much.
Comment by Major Tom — November 17, 2008 @ 9:04 am

Great movie… in fact I watched it with my Tagalog teacher years ago.
Comment by Sidney — November 18, 2008 @ 10:57 am

To Sidney: It has a strong storyline and well-knitted, and very eloquent use of the Tagalog dialect…
Comment by Major Tom — November 19, 2008 @ 11:19 pm

I completely agree with you regarding the movies spewed out in the Philippines today (there are probably the rare exceptions). Just watching the trailers turn me off. My Filipino cinematic experiences are few and far between so I’m no expert but I remember liking Pepe & Pilar, The Perfumed Nightmare by Kidlat Tahimik and The Crying Ladies with Sharon Cuneta. Coincidentally, these three movies are the only ones I’ve seen since 1983. Pretty sad, huh? When I was still in the Philippines, I loved watching the old black and white movies, especially Dolphy’s comedies. He was so funny. I think the acting back then was better - more natural, without the overly dramatic flair that is so common these days. I haven’t seen a Filipino horror movie so if you know of a good one, let me know. I’ll be looking for Himala… Thanks for the tip!
Comment by joanne — November 20, 2008 @ 3:49 am
filintoronto

Toronto, Canada

#800 Dec 4, 2008
hi guys! i was away for a while! hey i found this wonderful videos at youtube.

be amazed and be very amazed!:)-

nobody can ever do it other than La Aunor



http://www.youtube.com/watch...

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Roly

Manila, Philippines

#801 Dec 4, 2008
i've been a nora fan since 1969. I admire no other star but only ate guy. i missed her so much na. i miss her kind of films. The movies nowadays are trash compared to what she has done before. All quality and classic films. My collection of her albums in alpha records are complete. all 21 albums in CDs. I buy all her films in CDs whenever i saw them in record and video bars. Sana ma transfer din in CDs ang mga movies nya under her own production outfit. Ang NV at NCV Films.
Carmelo

San Francisco, CA

#802 Dec 5, 2008
thanks filintoronto for these links of DH. Ang galing talaga ni AG

panoorin niyo rin itong version/rendition ni Ate Guy ng Greatest Love of All:

pinoyny77

Shelbyville, IN

#803 Dec 6, 2008
UP Film Institute Screens Sa Likod ng Himala

The UP Film Institute (UPFI), in cooperation with the International Circle of Online Noranians (ICON), will hold free screenings of Sa Likod ng Himala, a movie-in-the- making documentary on IshmaelBernal' s masterpiece Himala (ECP,1982), fittingly at the UPFI Ishmael Bernal Gallery on December 16, 2008 (Tuesday), starting at 7 pm.

In Super 8mm format, this 20-minute documentary was made by the in-house staff of the former UP Film Center (now expanded into the UP Film Institute). It features raw footage of Bernal, the staff, and the cast in action during the filming of the movie's momentous stampede scene. The UPFI has preserved the original 26-year-old reel of the film in its archives in almost pristine state—a miracle of sorts

This one-night-only event is meant to honor the film Himala, starring Superstar Nora Aunor and penned by Ricky Lee, for winning the CNN APSA Viewers' Choice Award for Best Asia-Pacific Film of All Time, presented recently at the 2ndAsia-Pacific Screen Awards held in Queensland, Australia (see video).

This special tribute, a surprise year-ender for the UPFI, has been planned even before Himala got the CNN APSA award. "The fact that this Bernal film has been shortlisted with the works of world cinema masters like Akira Kurosawa, Satyajit Ray, Wong Kar-wai, and Ang Lee," said UPFI Programming Director Nonoy Lauzon, "is a great feat by itself."

Described by critic Alfred Yuson as"definitely world class," Himala holds the distinction of opening the 2nd Manila International Film Festival in 1983. It was handpicked by Berlin festival director Moritz de Hadeln, no less, to be part of the competition film selection of Berlin International Film Festival in the same year, the first and only Filipino film so far that competed for the Golden Bear. It was then screened in key Russian cities—Moscow, Kiev, andAlma-ata—before it went to the Chicago International Film Festival where it won the Bronze Hugo Award for Best Feature Film.

Himala has remained as one of NationalArtist Ishmael Bernal's most exhibited films in both local and international film events. From the '80s to the current decade, it has been shown in world's key cities such as Taipei, Bangkok, Tokyo, Jakarta, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, Vienna, and New York. This year, Himala was included in the programs of Berlin Hot Shots Film Festival and Paris Film Festival.

The Bernal Gallery on the same day will showcase amini Himala exhibit, organized by the International Circle of Online Noranians. The group will also conduct a short program honoring the film and some of the people behind it. In between screenings of the documentary, ICON will also hold activities such as film discussion and forum with distinguished guests.
misslanie

Glendale, CA

#804 Dec 7, 2008
JHUN wrote:
Based on awards and achievements, Vilma Santos is the greatest Philippine actress of all time second to none.
You misspeled none my dear...it should be Second to N O R A!
meng

Saudi Arabia

#805 Dec 7, 2008
FILM IDOL OF THE PHILIPPINES HAS LARGER-THAN-LIFE AURA (Cannes)
By Jay Scott

“There is not much difference between a movie star and a saint.”- Filipino director Lino Brocka

CANNES – No secular celebrity in the western world is comparable to Nora Aunor, a Filipino singer who attended the Cannes Film Festival in connection with the European premiere of Bona, Lino Brocka’s superb melodrama in which an 18-year-old student (Miss Aunor) becomes the lover and slave of a male movie star (Philip Salvador). Her fans meet once a week in Miss Aunor’s hometown, and they wear T-shirts proclaiming their reason for living.“I am a Noranian,” those T-shirts say, and their bearers mean the message with a fervency that makes the screams of Elvis fans look like polite whispers of approbation.

In Bona, an incisive study of the erotic religiosity of celebrity worship, Miss Aunor becomes infatuated with Salvador, a star of action movies (in real life, Salvador, the lead in last year’s jaguar, is himself a sometime star of action movies). She waits on him: lights his cigarets, wipes the sweat from his brow, bathes him. Imagine Barbra Streisand cast as a groupie.(Except that Miss Aunor has the self-effacing ability to carry the casting off.)

“I began to think more and more of the project when I got to know Nora Aunor,” Brocka, the most accomplished director in the Philippines, said.“When I first worked with Nora, on Whore of a Mother, I was shocked to see the adulation of her fans. They were forever wiping her sweat with their handkerchiefs. All day long they talk about how beautiful she is – how proportional her legs are, her eyes, her nose, her eyelashes – when you know very well that she isn’t beautiful. I know a lot about screaming fans, but these beat them all.”

If Nora walks unescorted and undisguised into the streets of Manila, a riot breaks out. Her concerts are held in the largest arenas available. Brocka attributes to her more power than any star he has ever seen.“After the premiere of Whore of a Mother, a big crowd waited for outside the lobby. People were unruly. Her car was being rocked. All she did was put a finger on her lips, and it was like the parting of the Red Sea. You could hear a pin drop.”

Salvador, her co-star in Bona (and on stage in the Philippines in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof), whispered to me at the opening of the picture in the Directors’ Fortnight section of the Cannes Film Festival,“She’s small, isn’t she? You cannot imagine how large she is on stage. You cannot imagine the hysteria there would be if we were in Manila.”

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