Low NM runoff from snow accumulation projected

Jan 9, 2013 Full story: KOB-TV 18

Forecasters with the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service say flow on the Rio Grande at a measuring point between Santa Fe and Los Alamos is projected to be just under half the average from 1981 to 2010.

Full Story

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#1 Jan 9, 2013
Seriously? Does it take a college educated(?) meteorologist to determine that? What's next, "Little Rain Means A Dry Summer"???
LOL

Los Alamos, NM

#2 Jan 9, 2013
CornDogz wrote:
Seriously? Does it take a college educated(?) meteorologist to determine that? What's next, "Little Rain Means A Dry Summer"???
nope, but it is nice to know someone will repeat the obvious, and what we see is actually what is happening.

I vote we stop letting water out of the state and US into mexico and naywhere else, too!

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#3 Jan 9, 2013
LOL wrote:
<quoted text>
nope, but it is nice to know someone will repeat the obvious, and what we see is actually what is happening.
I vote we stop letting water out of the state and US into mexico and naywhere else, too!
Something about a 1938 water law that prevents that. A law it would be impossible to change regardless of the # of attys assigned to do so. I don't know how the law is written but HOPE it addresses this as a % of water flowing in the river so when a drier year comes, less flows and less is allowed to get to TX etc. One thing we do know is TX will always whine for more water, regardless of flow.
IMNEVERWRONG

Oklahoma City, OK

#4 Jan 9, 2013
CornDogz wrote:
<quoted text>
Something about a 1938 water law that prevents that. A law it would be impossible to change regardless of the # of attys assigned to do so. I don't know how the law is written but HOPE it addresses this as a % of water flowing in the river so when a drier year comes, less flows and less is allowed to get to TX etc. One thing we do know is TX will always whine for more water, regardless of flow.
Get rid of you green grass lawns and recycle rain water for gray water usage. Texas always trumps nEW Mexico. It is irresponsible and environmentally destructive to restrict the natural flow process of rivers.

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#5 Jan 10, 2013
IMNEVERWRONG wrote:
<quoted text> Get rid of you green grass lawns and recycle rain water for gray water usage. Texas always trumps nEW Mexico. It is irresponsible and environmentally destructive to restrict the natural flow process of rivers.
Who said anything about restricting flow? I'm saying if its a drier year and less gets into the river, then that same % of less should be what TX gets.

Recycle rain water? What rain?

TX has lots of water, way more than NM has.
Concha Pena

Albuquerque, NM

#6 Jan 10, 2013
looks like I won't have a place to bathe now.

“I Am No One To Be Trifled With”

Since: Jun 09

Dread Pirate Roberts

#7 Jan 10, 2013
This drought is hitting many states hard...chile crops are gonna suffer big time...
IMNEVERWRONG

Oklahoma City, OK

#8 Jan 11, 2013
CornDogz wrote:
<quoted text>
Who said anything about restricting flow? I'm saying if its a drier year and less gets into the river, then that same % of less should be what TX gets.
Recycle rain water? What rain?
TX has lots of water, way more than NM has.
It a rather simple process to Capture rain water in order to supply water needed for your desert plants in your front and back yards. The SW states should make it mandatory to prohibit all grass lawns in residential and commercial property. SUGGESTION: Have the city Disconnect the outside faucets. Have a grade school student give you a lesson the amount of rain Texas receives. It's a fairly large state in the U.S.

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#9 Jan 11, 2013
IMNEVERWRONG wrote:
<quoted text> It a rather simple process to Capture rain water in order to supply water needed for your desert plants in your front and back yards. The SW states should make it mandatory to prohibit all grass lawns in residential and commercial property. SUGGESTION: Have the city Disconnect the outside faucets. Have a grade school student give you a lesson the amount of rain Texas receives. It's a fairly large state in the U.S.
Ok, since you wish to pick tiny points instead of grasp the concept as a whole, lets retry things.

- capturing the rain water is not the problem, its the lack of rain in the area that is. Hence your snide remark of a HS student is not warranted.
- if you don't want plants, don't have them. There is no cause to go to the overzealous methods/laws you suggest just because we live in a desert environment. Being frugal w/ our water is a good thing but it appears you want to go overboard with your conservation. Granted that many of the lawns in the Los Ranchos area are insanely large and use a ton of water to keep green, but they are the exception, not the rule.
- disconnecting all outside faucets would not be a brilliant idea if one finds they need water for an emergency.
- I travel TX a lot, particularly the Dallas area. Of course that isn't indicative of the entire state, but that region gets a lot of rain, and I do mean a lot. Just like portions of NM get a whole lot more rain than other areas do. I submit, my comment was based on the Dallas region in general. Now if we're talking just the Rio Grande then it only serves a small segment of the entire state.

In the end, if one wishes to live like Don Schraeder by UNM, take sponge baths once a week, recycly pee and all the crap he does, fine. However the vast majority of people here don't wish to go to those extremes.

“26.2”

Since: Feb 08

Santa Fe, NM

#10 Jan 11, 2013
CornDogz wrote:
Seriously? Does it take a college educated(?) meteorologist to determine that? What's next, "Little Rain Means A Dry Summer"???
It's more complicated than you may think, CD. Many mountain areas have dismal snowpack so far, but Chama has a good 12-18 inches in town right now with 3 feet+ in the high country. Go take your snowmobile up there if you don't believe me.
IMNEVERWRONG

Oklahoma City, OK

#11 Jan 12, 2013
CornDogz wrote:
<quoted text>
Ok, since you wish to pick tiny points instead of grasp the concept as a whole, lets retry things.
- capturing the rain water is not the problem, its the lack of rain in the area that is. Hence your snide remark of a HS student is not warranted.
- if you don't want plants, don't have them. There is no cause to go to the overzealous methods/laws you suggest just because we live in a desert environment. Being frugal w/ our water is a good thing but it appears you want to go overboard with your conservation. Granted that many of the lawns in the Los Ranchos area are insanely large and use a ton of water to keep green, but they are the exception, not the rule.
- disconnecting all outside faucets would not be a brilliant idea if one finds they need water for an emergency.
- I travel TX a lot, particularly the Dallas area. Of course that isn't indicative of the entire state, but that region gets a lot of rain, and I do mean a lot.
A GRADE SCHOOL student, not HIGH SCHOOL son. In addition, I was referring to having a GRADE SCHOOL student teach you the different amounts of rainfall an area receives. The DFW area has experienced, along with others parts of this country, what's called a prolonged drought. Get some sleep and proof read your post, before responding.
dpb

Westcliffe, CO

#12 Jan 12, 2013
January 09, 2013

DALLAS — Nearly two-thirds of the state’s 254 counties have been declared federal primary natural disaster areas from drought and heat in a step toward providing help.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Wednesday included 157 Texas counties in the 2013 designation. Qualified farm operators are eligible for low-interest emergency loans.

National Climate Data Center numbers released Tuesday indicated 2011 and 2012 were the state’s warmest two-year span in more than 100 years. Texas had its driest year ever in 2011.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack overall designated 597 counties in 14 states as primary natural disaster areas due to lingering drought and hot weather.

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#13 Jan 12, 2013
Lobo Viejo wrote:
<quoted text>
It's more complicated than you may think, CD. Many mountain areas have dismal snowpack so far, but Chama has a good 12-18 inches in town right now with 3 feet+ in the high country. Go take your snowmobile up there if you don't believe me.
Agreed, that why I'm saying it doesn't take a college degree and then some to determine that a low snow pak will result in less runoff. Some areas will, some won't, but in aggregate they equate to a poor runoff. Maybe I should be a weather forecaster<G>, couldn't do much worse!

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#14 Jan 12, 2013
IMNEVERWRONG wrote:
<quoted text> A GRADE SCHOOL student, not HIGH SCHOOL son. In addition, I was referring to having a GRADE SCHOOL student teach you the different amounts of rainfall an area receives. The DFW area has experienced, along with others parts of this country, what's called a prolonged drought. Get some sleep and proof read your post, before responding.
Really? Since I was just there for a month I beg to differ with you. And since I see all the lakes and ponds in that region, I also beg to differ. Is it drier than normal, yes, but not near on the same level as we are. Their parameters are far from ours. Two days ago they just had a 1½" rainfall w/ much more closeby. And Abq has had?

Grade school was a typo, the G key is next to the H key.

Son? ROTFLMAO...
IMNEVERWRONG

Oklahoma City, OK

#15 Jan 12, 2013
CornDogz wrote:
<quoted text>
Really? Since I was just there for a month I beg to differ with you. And since I see all the lakes and ponds in that region, I also beg to differ. Is it drier than normal, yes, but not near on the same level as we are. Their parameters are far from ours. Two days ago they just had a 1½" rainfall w/ much more closeby. And Abq has had?
Grade school was a typo, the G key is next to the H key.
Son? ROTFLMAO...
Please look at the drought monitor across the U.S. to grasp an idea of the lack of rainfall across the country. You live in what is called desert.,Many past civilizations have either moved or died off in times of extended drought. We all need to conserve. That means no residential and commercial grass lawns.

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#16 Jan 12, 2013
IMNEVERWRONG wrote:
<quoted text> Please look at the drought monitor across the U.S. to grasp an idea of the lack of rainfall across the country. You live in what is called desert.,Many past civilizations have either moved or died off in times of extended drought. We all need to conserve. That means no residential and commercial grass lawns.
Seeing it with my own eyes is much better than relying on some skewed data spin populating a map.

Your reference to "You live in..." tells me you are a resident of Norman, OK as opposed to Abq or even NM. So why do you care about our runoff? It has no bearing whatsoever on OK, so why are you even posting here? An environmental zealot perhaps? Don't like lawns, don't have one.
IMNEVERWRONG

Oklahoma City, OK

#17 Jan 12, 2013
CornDogz wrote:
<quoted text>
Seeing it with my own eyes is much better than relying on some skewed data spin populating a map.
Your reference to "You live in..." tells me you are a resident of Norman, OK as opposed to Abq or even NM. So why do you care about our runoff? It has no bearing whatsoever on OK, so why are you even posting here? An environmental zealot perhaps? Don't like lawns, don't have one.
Did the turnip truck stop? There are two major rivers that flow from New Mexico through parts of Texas and into Oklahoma. Go onto the Internet to figure out their names. Where I live should be no concern of yours. It is not necessary to waste water, I've told you, use runoff from the rainfall. If it is not enough for grass, grow cacti! Your fiction writing is very good, you can make up most anything.

“US Navy”

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#18 Jan 12, 2013
IMNEVERWRONG wrote:
<quoted text> Did the turnip truck stop? There are two major rivers that flow from New Mexico through parts of Texas and into Oklahoma. Go onto the Internet to figure out their names. Where I live should be no concern of yours. It is not necessary to waste water, I've told you, use runoff from the rainfall. If it is not enough for grass, grow cacti! Your fiction writing is very good, you can make up most anything.
I don't know, did you fall off the turnip truck? Two rivers may flow there but the Rio Grande is not one of them. That's what the thread was all about, runoff into the RG. Bye bye

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