people in military bases in France in...
David Vally

United States

#2328 Oct 16, 2012
Robert Ballester wrote:
<quoted text>BUSSAC FRANCE
My dad was station there would love to see pictures or know what part of france the base was as I live there with him and was in the 4 grade so I don't remember much.His Name was David Vally
.Please e-mail me at [email protected]

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#2329 Oct 16, 2012
Tom Johnson wrote:
<quoted text>
My dad was Navy, so I know what you mean (lol). I rode a troop ship to Germany in 1963, the USS Gieger (not sure of the spelling), then a train to France. That was the only ship I was ever on. I saw that ship again in Vietnam six years later.
Tom
I too rode a troopship from Brooklyn to Bremerhaven, in November, 1963. Took 11 days, should have taken much less, but the north Atlantic is stormy in November. Worst case of seasickness I've ever seen, everyone was sick. Miserable trip. Took a train from Bremerhaven to Paris. Conductors served us some 5$ Croissants, and strong coffee. Took advantage of some green GIs.
Tom Johnson

Munday, TX

#2330 Oct 16, 2012
Butch Wester wrote:
<quoted text>
I too rode a troopship from Brooklyn to Bremerhaven, in November, 1963. Took 11 days, should have taken much less, but the north Atlantic is stormy in November. Worst case of seasickness I've ever seen, everyone was sick. Miserable trip. Took a train from Bremerhaven to Paris. Conductors served us some 5$ Croissants, and strong coffee. Took advantage of some green GIs.
We had smooth sailing that May. I'm sure a few got seasick, but I didn't. I also lucked out by not having to work. I was on the roster for kitchen duty during the trip, but I had a sore on a finger, and when the cook saw it, he refused to let me work in his kitchen. The guard roster was already filled, so I read and played cards the whole voyage. I loved the train ride from Bremerhaven to Paris, then on into Poitiers. I went to Paris two more times, but don't remember anything about it. Oh, I flew home. By 1966, I think most of the ships were being used for Southeast Asia.
charliebllute

Beverly, MA

#2331 Oct 17, 2012
I was on a MATS ship that left Bermerhaven and sailed across the Atlantic to New York. It took about 13 days, and it was rather peaceful the whole trip. I had a soft job on the ship, working on the ship's newspaper. When we arrived in the harbor at New York, all I could see was duffill bags going over the side. I bet there are tons of uniforms down there. I hope everyone is having a great fall.
David Vally

United States

#2332 Oct 17, 2012
MERCIER Jean-Pierre wrote:
I wrote two books and prepares TOME 3, the camps Captieux, Bussac Forest, Bordeaux, Périgueux, The Braconne, Fontenet-St Jean d'Angely, Chizé.
FRANCE ALAN SUTTON Editions 2009 and 2011
Would love to check out the books.Can you get a english [email protected]
John Beard

Raleigh, NC

#2333 Oct 17, 2012
I sailed from Staten Island to Bremerhaven in October, 1954, on the USS Upshur. It was announced that our bay would pull KP for the trip. I was picked to work the 1st shift for the evening meal. Was assigned to work for a short, friendly cook whom I assumed was Chinese. He told me I would make chocolate pudding. Emptied a case of powdered mix in a huge steam pot. As I was adding water to the mix, the cook told me "Seasickness all in head--Don't think about it." Finished addding water, the heat was turned on & I was given a large wooden paddle to stir the mix. Steam was comming up from the pot onto my face. The cook then gave me a bottle of worchestershire sauce, saying "you feel sick, sprinkle on tongue, you'll feel better." I dang near drank the whole bottle while I stirred the mix. Finally it was done. The cook showed me how to drain the pudding into a dozen or so large stainless steel bowls. My queasiness was almost over. Then the cook said, "Now we decorate." He opened a large box of shreaded coconut--colored blue, yellow and green. It was the green that got me. I rushed to the head. I was ill for most of the evening, but by morning was OK. And, while I was pulling KP, it had been decided that our bay would pull guard duty instead of KP. The guard crews were assigned while I was on KP so I had nothing to do but read, play cards and watch the evening movies. But, on the 3rd or 4th day out, while we were finishing chow, the KPs brought out the dessert--in was my chocolate pudding in the stainless steel bowls with the blue, yellow and green strewn on top. I got sick again. Otherwise it was a smooth sail to Bremerhaven.
Tom Johnson

Munday, TX

#2334 Oct 18, 2012
John Beard wrote:
I sailed from Staten Island to Bremerhaven in October, 1954, on the USS Upshur. It was announced that our bay would pull KP for the trip. I was picked to work the 1st shift for the evening meal. Was assigned to work for a short, friendly cook whom I assumed was Chinese. He told me I would make chocolate pudding. Emptied a case of powdered mix in a huge steam pot. As I was adding water to the mix, the cook told me "Seasickness all in head--Don't think about it." Finished addding water, the heat was turned on & I was given a large wooden paddle to stir the mix. Steam was comming up from the pot onto my face. The cook then gave me a bottle of worchestershire sauce, saying "you feel sick, sprinkle on tongue, you'll feel better." I dang near drank the whole bottle while I stirred the mix. Finally it was done. The cook showed me how to drain the pudding into a dozen or so large stainless steel bowls. My queasiness was almost over. Then the cook said, "Now we decorate." He opened a large box of shreaded coconut--colored blue, yellow and green. It was the green that got me. I rushed to the head. I was ill for most of the evening, but by morning was OK. And, while I was pulling KP, it had been decided that our bay would pull guard duty instead of KP. The guard crews were assigned while I was on KP so I had nothing to do but read, play cards and watch the evening movies. But, on the 3rd or 4th day out, while we were finishing chow, the KPs brought out the dessert--in was my chocolate pudding in the stainless steel bowls with the blue, yellow and green strewn on top. I got sick again. Otherwise it was a smooth sail to Bremerhaven.
hahaha Great story, John. I remember watching those movies too. I think we sat on the floor, and the movie was shown on a screen at the front. We also had a writer with us, and he conned the crew into letting him write a continuing story for the voyage. Something about a Dolphin, if I remember right. It was a daily adventure until we arrived at Port. Good grief, that was almost fifty years ago!
Frawley BECKER

Burbank, CA

#2335 Oct 18, 2012
To Charlie BLUTE:

What is a MATS ship?(What do the letters stand for?) And what year did you make the Bremerhaven-New York trip? Did the ship have a name? Why did it take 13 days? When I sailed on the French Line's "Île-de-France in 1955,from New York to Cherbourg,France it took 6 days. Of course that was a commercial liner." I assume that there were duties (guard, KP) if you were on a military transport ship. Were dependents traveling with you? If not, how did they return to the States? Much thanks!
FRAWLEY BECKER [email protected]
Jim Blackburn

Toivola, MI

#2336 Oct 18, 2012
Frawley BECKER wrote:
To Charlie BLUTE:
What is a MATS ship?(What do the letters stand for?) And what year did you make the Bremerhaven-New York trip? Did the ship have a name? Why did it take 13 days? When I sailed on the French Line's "Île-de-France in 1955,from New York to Cherbourg,France it took 6 days. Of course that was a commercial liner." I assume that there were duties (guard, KP) if you were on a military transport ship. Were dependents traveling with you? If not, how did they return to the States? Much thanks!
FRAWLEY BECKER [email protected]
I flew to Paris in 1959 on MATS DC6. The seats were all facing backwards. I always thought MATS stood for Military Air Transport.
PatEUCOM

Lexington, KY

#2337 Oct 18, 2012
Jim Blackburn wrote:
<quoted text>
I flew to Paris in 1959 on MATS DC6. The seats were all facing backwards. I always thought MATS stood for Military Air Transport.
I flew MATS to Orly in Aug 1956.We landed at Gander NewFoundland and ate some horrible food.We flew far enough north to see icebergs.The flight from McGuire AFB took 18 hours.I was awake at dawn and the co pilot came aft and asked me and another sleepless lady if we wanted to go forward to the cockpit and watch the sun rise up through the clouds.Really beautiful.Nice flight and we didn't face aft.I though MATS meant Military Air Transport too.
tomsimons

Humble, TX

#2338 Oct 19, 2012
MATS was Military Air Transport for aircraft.
USNS United States Naval Service and MSTS Military Sea Transport Service for ships.
tomsimons

Humble, TX

#2339 Oct 19, 2012
That was suppose to read MATS Military Air Transport Service
charliebllute

Beverly, MA

#2340 Oct 19, 2012
Frawley BECKER wrote:
To Charlie BLUTE:
What is a MATS ship?(What do the letters stand for?) And what year did you make the Bremerhaven-New York trip? Did the ship have a name? Why did it take 13 days? When I sailed on the French Line's "Île-de-France in 1955,from New York to Cherbourg,France it took 6 days. Of course that was a commercial liner." I assume that there were duties (guard, KP) if you were on a military transport ship. Were dependents traveling with you? If not, how did they return to the States? Much thanks!
FRAWLEY BECKER [email protected]
It looks like several folks already answered the first question Frawley, I made my trip in the late spring of 1962. I am sure the ship had a name, but I don't remember it! Why did it take so long, I really do not know. It was a military ship maybe that is why it took longer than your ship. There were no dependents on my ship, it was all soldiers and there were no females either. We were allowed to go out on the top of the ship during good weather, if it was going to be stormy, we had to stay below. I believe civilians, children and the like were flown back to the USA. When I was assigned to go to Europe, I was flown to Paris and arrived at Orly Airport. I hope I helped you out, Fawley.
tomsimons

Humble, TX

#2341 Oct 19, 2012
I flew to Paris via New Foundland aboard a MATS C-118 in 1959 and returned in 1962 via Bremerhaven aboard the USNS General Gordon. That took ten days to pier 41 Brooklyn,NY. The reason is she only made 14 knots per hour and the seas were rough because of a gale blowing.The Ile de France could make about 24 kph.It also depends on weather condtions Sorry Mr. Bllute didn't mean to walk on you. Hope that helped out tho. tom

Since: Dec 10

Location hidden

#2342 Oct 19, 2012
John Beard wrote:
I sailed from Staten Island to Bremerhaven in October, 1954, on the USS Upshur. It was announced that our bay would pull KP for the trip. I was picked to work the 1st shift for the evening meal. Was assigned to work for a short, friendly cook whom I assumed was Chinese. He told me I would make chocolate pudding. Emptied a case of powdered mix in a huge steam pot. As I was adding water to the mix, the cook told me "Seasickness all in head--Don't think about it." Finished addding water, the heat was turned on & I was given a large wooden paddle to stir the mix. Steam was comming up from the pot onto my face. The cook then gave me a bottle of worchestershire sauce, saying "you feel sick, sprinkle on tongue, you'll feel better." I dang near drank the whole bottle while I stirred the mix. Finally it was done. The cook showed me how to drain the pudding into a dozen or so large stainless steel bowls. My queasiness was almost over. Then the cook said, "Now we decorate." He opened a large box of shreaded coconut--colored blue, yellow and green. It was the green that got me. I rushed to the head. I was ill for most of the evening, but by morning was OK. And, while I was pulling KP, it had been decided that our bay would pull guard duty instead of KP. The guard crews were assigned while I was on KP so I had nothing to do but read, play cards and watch the evening movies. But, on the 3rd or 4th day out, while we were finishing chow, the KPs brought out the dessert--in was my chocolate pudding in the stainless steel bowls with the blue, yellow and green strewn on top. I got sick again. Otherwise it was a smooth sail to Bremerhaven.
Interestingly (or not), it was the Upshur that I traveled on in November 1963. Everyone on that boat was sick except for a couple of Mexican guys who'd never even seen the ocean. Putting together a crew for kitchen duty was a real problem. I saw a Major working there carrying a big pot of some sort of chili or stew. He took a few steps, set the pot down, and threw up on the floor. That's how bad it was. We would mostly grab apples, grapes, oranges or bananas, and that's what I lived on (barely) for 11 days. I heard the Upshur was sunk shortly after that. Don't know for sure, but it was a fitting end to a miserable ship as far as I was concerned.
Norman Gardner

New York, NY

#2343 Oct 19, 2012
Butch Wester wrote:
<quoted text>
Interestingly (or not), it was the Upshur that I traveled on in November 1963. Everyone on that boat was sick except for a couple of Mexican guys who'd never even seen the ocean. Putting together a crew for kitchen duty was a real problem. I saw a Major working there carrying a big pot of some sort of chili or stew. He took a few steps, set the pot down, and threw up on the floor. That's how bad it was. We would mostly grab apples, grapes, oranges or bananas, and that's what I lived on (barely) for 11 days. I heard the Upshur was sunk shortly after that. Don't know for sure, but it was a fitting end to a miserable ship as far as I was concerned.
I, too, sailed to Bremehaven on the Upshur;That was in 1960. And, like you, I was seasick all the way. The conditions was horrible. I thought we would never make it. There was trouble with the engines,, the sea was rough, so many other things to sicken you. Plus, the food was terrible. I could have had better meals in a can of "C" ration. Luckily, I did not come home the same way.
Walt Bollech

Dover, DE

#2344 Oct 19, 2012
Butch Wester wrote:
<quoted text>
I too rode a troopship from Brooklyn to Bremerhaven, in November, 1963. Took 11 days, should have taken much less, but the north Atlantic is stormy in November. Worst case of seasickness I've ever seen, everyone was sick. Miserable trip. Took a train from Bremerhaven to Paris. Conductors served us some 5$ Croissants, and strong coffee. Took advantage of some green GIs.
I went over on the USNS Buckner in Jan of 62. A rough trip, a lot of us were hanging our heads over the side. LOL Arrived in Bremerhaven and boarded a train to Paris. Returned to the states on the Buckner in May of 64. I remember it was a easy voyage back smooth seas all way to Brooklyn.

Walt Bollech
Camp des Loges
Bill Casady

Bakersfield, CA

#2345 Oct 19, 2012
Dang, too bad, fellas. In 1966, my trip to Evreux started on a Pan-Am DC-8 from McGuire to Orly in about 8 hours. Bussed into Evreux for 13 great months before the closure. Then, on to Incirlik, Turkey.(Maybe that was Karma for not having to ride a troop ship.)
-Bill Casady
Tom Johnson

Munday, TX

#2346 Oct 19, 2012
Bill Casady wrote:
Dang, too bad, fellas. In 1966, my trip to Evreux started on a Pan-Am DC-8 from McGuire to Orly in about 8 hours. Bussed into Evreux for 13 great months before the closure. Then, on to Incirlik, Turkey.(Maybe that was Karma for not having to ride a troop ship.)
-Bill Casady
Hi Bill, several of us from Poitiers, France went to Incirik for a while. We have pictures! http://groups.yahoo.com/group/caserne_abovill...
Tom
Walt Bollech

Dover, DE

#2347 Oct 22, 2012
Barbara wrote:
<quoted text>
Just curious if you got into Camp Des Loges?? We had no trouble, just told them our fathers were stationed there when it was an american base.
Hi Barb,

Sorry for the late reply, as I just came across your post. I did get back to Paris for a few days in Aug and made a trip out to Camp des Loges. However, as I expected, my wife and I were not allowed to enter. In 92 when I returned for a visit I was allowed to enter via the main gate and proceed to the former MP building that was located on your right after entering. At that point I was informed that I could go no farther. This time as we approached the main gate we were met by a private security guard who politely told we would not be able to enter the base.

Walt

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Long Beach Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
What is the back story re Scottsdale Townhomes (Apr '10) Tue Casper 20
News 49 still at large in Hawaiian Gardens gang bust (May '09) Jan 16 Hgr 175
News U.S. Customs agents seize aluminum shipments Jan 16 Modemitv 1
News Recycled wastewater to give Los Angeles County ... (Nov '15) Jan 16 Dudley 6
Anyone remember "Seal Beach James" ? (May '08) Jan 15 rvsdguy 56
News Suspect Identified In Possible Domestic Violenc... (Mar '13) Jan 8 Mkawbrown 26
Helicopters constantly flying overhead... why? (Jun '10) Jan 5 MEe 20

Long Beach Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Long Beach Mortgages