Electric Carts at Walmart

Electric Carts at Walmart

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Me Oh My

Manchester, KY

#1 Jan 15, 2011
I just came from Walmart and was in line behind a woman that was in one of those electric carts she sat in the cart and unloaded it onto the belt then "drove" on up to the cashier, but would not load her bags back into her cart after the cashier bagged her groceries. The cashier kept having to come around to put the bags into her cart for her. Which normally I would have never thought anything about it. BUT, once the cashier got all of her bags loaded into the electric cart for her she "drove" over to the other buggies, got out of her electric cart and loaded the groceries into a regular cart and walked out a lot better than me and went halfway down through the parking lot.

Again normally I wouldn't have thought too much about it but I am on crutches from a broken leg and was hoping there was an electric cart available, but when there wasn't I managed to do some shopping while pushing a cart and me on crutches. While this woman just appeared to be too lazy to walk since she was able to walk to the middle of the parking lot while pushing a cart with no problems.
Old Man

Brodhead, KY

#2 Jan 15, 2011
I'm glad you said she "appeared" to have no problems, because none of us really know what her problems are. She may have been in a lot of pain making her track thru the parking lot. Also she was respectful enough to leave the cart inside for the next person that needed it instead of riding it out and leaving it in the parking lot where no one would have had use of it. It was unfortuanate that there wasn't a cart for you to ride in but I don't think it was anyone's fault. Also she must not of had a handicap sticker or she would have been parked right up front. So I wouldn't be to angry towards the person since we don't really know her physical condition. Not everyone that is handicapped is in a wheelchair, walker or crutches.
Jajajaja

Perryville, AR

#3 Jan 15, 2011
Hate to say it but most people are just damn lazy and I've worked in retail and most of the people who take those carts are in fact just too lazy/fat to walk. I watched an elderly woman have to sit and wait for over an hour one day because all the electric carts were taken up by people who don't actually need them. If you are big and have lots of health problems maybe you should walk and lose a bit of weight? GENIUS! I've never seen such lazy people. Those chairs should be reserved for elderly and handicapped only. Sorry but being fat and or lazy doesn't count.
Old Man

London, KY

#4 Jan 15, 2011
Jajajaja wrote:
Hate to say it but most people are just damn lazy and I've worked in retail and most of the people who take those carts are in fact just too lazy/fat to walk. I watched an elderly woman have to sit and wait for over an hour one day because all the electric carts were taken up by people who don't actually need them. If you are big and have lots of health problems maybe you should walk and lose a bit of weight? GENIUS! I've never seen such lazy people. Those chairs should be reserved for elderly and handicapped only. Sorry but being fat and or lazy doesn't count.
That would be nice but who is going to be the judge for how elderly and who is handicapped ? Just another exuse for our groceries to be higher. If you can't walk thru the store because of your health then you just have to take your chances on getting a cart. I'm handicapped but I manage to use a buggy for my groceries, I'd be embarrassed to use an electric one, even though I'm older than Sam Walton.
Let God be the judge

London, KY

#5 Jan 16, 2011
It is funny to me that it is just assumed that people who use the carts that dont need them are people who are just fat and or lazy. I have been to walmart several times and see teenagers playing even racing inside and outside the store and fyi none of them that I saw was fat they just wanted to play and the employees allowed it.. I have a 17yr old that is handicapped. If you saw him riding in the cart you would say he was lazy or playing because you cant see his disability when he is sitting down. Just because someone has a disability dont mean you can see it by looking at them.. Oh my son has been having to use them since the age of five and they are a help to alot of people so maybe should stop judging others and offer some help you never know what someone really has wrong with them. Oh and I am fat as you call it and I have never used one of those because I know some people really need them.
Hello

Richmond, KY

#6 Jan 16, 2011
Well I agree that often people use them that should be walking, but I once had to use them for a torn knee cartledge. I could get around in Aldi for a few things, but to manage Wal-Mart was just too much. I had to get weekly groceries for my elderly mother and about every 2 weeks had to go to Wal-Mart. For a couple months, I had no choice but to use the buggy. I was embarrased and I know people thought I was lazy, but I couldn't help it. To walk through the lot, then the store, then back and unload and put away the groceries was way more than I could do. So you don't always know by looking.
Me Oh My

Manchester, KY

#7 Jan 16, 2011
I completely agree that you cannot tell ones disability just by looking at them. My mom is one of those, to see her you would think that she is the picture of health, but in reality she has a severe bone disease. Her bones are extremely fragile if she steps the wrong way she could break a bone. She has a broken wrist right now from picking up a gallon of milk. But unless you have xray vision you would never know this about her. But as someone said above this post you would NEVER see her in one of the electric carts, she would be too embarrassed. As long as she is able to walk she will walk and push her cart. Although she does have a handicapped tag in her car, she doesn't always park in the handicapped spots

But the lady I was speaking of walked through the parking lot pushing her buggy at a very good pace, not slow as if she were having breathing problems, not walking with a limp, or any outwardly signs of any type of disability. So if she were able to walk that well pushing a cart in the parking lot, why couldn't she have walked pushing a cart inside the store?

Oh, and one more thing, normally my husband goes with me and he pushes the cart while I hobble on the crutches but he had to work overtime and I went by myself thinking/hoping for an electric cart. But I made do. I just know that it is a shame that some people "abuse" using the carts while others that really need them can't use them.
Old Man

London, KY

#8 Jan 16, 2011
The use of the electric carts are there for a convienence not a right. I'm sure there are people that are going to abuse it, there always is. But how do we really know when someone is abusing the priviledge. And Wal Mart is not going to tell someone just because they walk in under their own power that they can't use a cart because they don't look disabled. This would be opening up a lawsuit if that person fell in the store and had been refused a cart, when carts were available. So yes there are abusers of the system this forum is full of examples.

Hope your leg gets mended up soon and you can throw those crutches away. Wal Mart is a good place for excercise and therapy by walking around and around. Good Luck.
just wondering

Lexington, KY

#9 Jan 16, 2011
I have a handicap and to look at me it would not show. I have a lung disease that at times makes it very hard to walk because it leaves me breathless and in pain. Walking around Wal-mart pushing a cart is not even an opton. I may be one of those people you think do not deserve to use an electric cart. You do not always see a persons handicap.
healthy now

Cynthiana, KY

#10 Jan 16, 2011
I had a rather major surgery that took a while for me to heal. I was not allowed to push a shopping cart. I was able to stand up and reach for products and to unload the cart. I just wasn't allowed to push a heavy cart. I used the electronic cart once. I couldn't have shopped alone without it. I rode it all the way to my car and brought it back into the store. I explained my situation to the cashier. She offered to get someone to take my purchases outside for me, but I declined because I was able to pick up everything that I had bought. I was thankful for the cart, and it gave me a great deal more tolerance for people using them than I once had. I, like some of you, used to think the overweight people needed to walk so they might actually lose some weight. Now I realize that those people may have had other health issues that prevented that. Having some independence is a big deal for people who are in some way handicapped. It's embarrassing to use the carts because you know what people are thinking. I have since tried to make it less embarrassing for others by changing my attitude towards them. Give them a smile and a helping hand instead of a scowl. Sure, kids will be kids. I have seen teenagers riding in the regular shopping carts. That's not acceptable behavior either. Who wants their food where nasty shoes and butts have been? It's better for some to abuse the use of the carts than for no one to benefit.
Cool Breeze

Science Hill, KY

#11 Jan 16, 2011
I have been handicapped for several years. I never dreamed when I was younger that I'd be in this kind of shape. I have three kinds of arthritis and a fractured fifth lumbar that grew back deformed. I'm in severe pain most of the time and to stand stationary is even worse. I can walk short distances but then have to rest. I've been like this since age 32...I'm now 52. I've had to wait on these electric carts my share at Walmart and other places. Some places don't even provide them. Yes, I'm "fat" as you say. Who wouldn't be not being able to exercise. I'm sure people think I'm just too lazy to walk and there is nothing wrong with me. For this very reason and not wanting to give up that small portion of independence, I forced myself to use the regular carts for years. Being handicapped and riding one of these electric carts is degrading to me. People won't get out of the way , you can't see where you are going around corners, you can't get items off the top shelf, you can't open the freezer doors to get out products and some spaces aren't big enough to drive the cart through or corner some areas. While I'm on the subject, it seems every body has a handicapped tag. The handicapped spaces are always full. Then if you need to go to the bath room, you even have to wait to get the handicapped stall. You wait 5 minutes or longer for some teen ager to get off the phone, some kids to stop playing or some whole family to come out. People will pass a whole line of toilets just so they can use the handicapped one. Since they are so popular, all of the toilets should be the same. Some of us have a genuine need for them. In my case I have such bad knees, I might as well squat as to use one of the regular toilets.
snicky

London, KY

#12 Jan 16, 2011
hey there cool breeze. my bones are worn out too. i did however manage to loose 80 pounds by diet alone. i cannot exercise either. if you leave sugar and greese or lard or whatever you fry things with completely out of your diet it might help you some. my breathing and painful knees and ankles really appreciate my diet now. it took a couple of months to really see results but once the weight started to go it really went. ask your doctor and see if this diet could help you too. i was so big i couldnt find jeans that looked right or anything. now i am a size 3 was size 20 22 . my friends wanted me to do before and after pnotos. i do not look at all the way i did. blessed be to you.
Cool Breeze

London, KY

#13 Jan 17, 2011
snicky wrote:
hey there cool breeze. my bones are worn out too. i did however manage to loose 80 pounds by diet alone. i cannot exercise either. if you leave sugar and greese or lard or whatever you fry things with completely out of your diet it might help you some. my breathing and painful knees and ankles really appreciate my diet now. it took a couple of months to really see results but once the weight started to go it really went. ask your doctor and see if this diet could help you too. i was so big i couldnt find jeans that looked right or anything. now i am a size 3 was size 20 22 . my friends wanted me to do before and after pnotos. i do not look at all the way i did. blessed be to you.
Thanks, I'll give it a try. It couldn't hurt.
friday

Charlotte, NC

#16 Jun 10, 2012
Old Man wrote:
<quoted text>
That would be nice but who is going to be the judge for how elderly and who is handicapped ? Just another exuse for our groceries to be higher. If you can't walk thru the store because of your health then you just have to take your chances on getting a cart. I'm handicapped but I manage to use a buggy for my groceries, I'd be embarrassed to use an electric one, even though I'm older than Sam Walton.
I have really bad knees and limp and i can walk walmart but one time i was shopping at walamrt--I had a bad moment of sweating, feeling faint and my knees gave out due to chrinc arthritis in both to the point but overweight due to thyroid and work out everyday and eta sensible so before you judge think about the other person. I ride the cart get the groceries and park the cart plug it in for the next person that may need put my groceries in a regular cart so I can use this as a crutch to lean on and yes i do walk fine but when your walking on knees that are bone on bone.. Please think about the person fat or not!
concerned mother

Edmonton, Canada

#17 May 28, 2013
My daughter who is Down's Syndrome with bad feet was asked to get off the cart, as she did not have a driver's licience and needed to be over 18 years of age. She is thirty nine years old. I was appalled at the direction. She has used that cart for at least four years without any mishaps in the store. They sure like the money the customers spend there. I seen this as distrimination of a handicapped person. She is a very good driver and enjoys shopping and spending her money there for her basic needs.Do not know who to ask about the driver's licence. can you help me.
Hmmm

Melvin, KY

#18 May 28, 2013
concerned mother wrote:
My daughter who is Down's Syndrome with bad feet was asked to get off the cart, as she did not have a driver's licience and needed to be over 18 years of age. She is thirty nine years old. I was appalled at the direction. She has used that cart for at least four years without any mishaps in the store. They sure like the money the customers spend there. I seen this as distrimination of a handicapped person. She is a very good driver and enjoys shopping and spending her money there for her basic needs.Do not know who to ask about the driver's licence. can you help me.
Which Walmart did this supposedly take place and exactly what day and approximate time ?
Ummm

Flat Lick, KY

#19 May 28, 2013
It's called a hoveround.
Lyndrea

Desert Hot Springs, CA

#20 Sep 30, 2016
Me Oh My wrote:
I completely agree that you cannot tell ones disability just by looking at them. My mom is one of those, to see her you would think that she is the picture of health, but in reality she has a severe bone disease. Her bones are extremely fragile if she steps the wrong way she could break a bone. She has a broken wrist right now from picking up a gallon of milk. But unless you have xray vision you would never know this about her. But as someone said above this post you would NEVER see her in one of the electric carts, she would be too embarrassed. As long as she is able to walk she will walk and push her cart. Although she does have a handicapped tag in her car, she doesn't always park in the handicapped spots

But the lady I was speaking of walked through the parking lot pushing her buggy at a very good pace, not slow as if she were having breathing problems, not walking with a limp, or any outwardly signs of any type of disability. So if she were able to walk that well pushing a cart in the parking lot, why couldn't she have walked pushing a cart inside the store?

Oh, and one more thing, normally my husband goes with me and he pushes the cart while I hobble on the crutches but he had to work overtime and I went by myself thinking/hoping for an electric cart. But I made do. I just know that it is a shame that some people "abuse" using the carts while others that really need them can't use them.
If your mother can walk around the store pushing a cart, then there is no reason for her that park in the handicapped spot....
Rachel

Bronx, NY

#21 Dec 10, 2017
I broke my ankle and just had surgery yesterday. I canít use crutches for long distances as I have fibromyalgia and my hands go numb. I want to go with my husband to the grocery store today but wondering if they would let me use a motorized cart for a broken ankle. Any thoughts?
Scrooge

West Jordan, UT

#22 Dec 10, 2017
Rachel wrote:
I broke my ankle and just had surgery yesterday. I canít use crutches for long distances as I have fibromyalgia and my hands go numb. I want to go with my husband to the grocery store today but wondering if they would let me use a motorized cart for a broken ankle. Any thoughts?
Apparently you don't! If you did--- you would not ask such a stupid question! They don't
provide a stupid cart ! LOL

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