A brief history of marijuana use in a...

A brief history of marijuana use in ancient Africa

Posted in the Little Falls Forum

Reefer Briefer

Little Falls, NY

#1 Feb 6, 2014
Also known as hemp or cannabis, marijuana is the oldest known psychoactive plant. It grows in many parts of the world is successfully cultivated in a wide range of soil types and climates. In ancient times, marijuana was known to have been used in religious rituals, as well as in medicinal preparations. It was highly revered for its ability to improve mood, alter perception and consciousness, as well as treating symptoms such as nausea, respiratory ailments, fever, and pain.

Cannabis Comes to Africa

The use of marijuana by the indigenous people of Africa can be traced back to 14th century Ethiopia. Since marijuana did not originate in Africa, the ancient tribes who used it had to acquire it through trading with outsiders. Archaeologists now believe that marijuana was introduced to African societies by trading goods with their Arab neighbors. Soon, through seed sharing and careful cultivation practices, cannabis culture had spread to other tribes throughout Africa, giving birth to a commodity that would become more valuable than gold.

Originally, African tribesmen chewed cannabis leaves, but they soon learned the art of smoking the plant, which changed African culture in many ways. New skills, like pipe-making, had to be learned and smoking marijuana became a large part of ritual and recreation which was performed in groups.

The Riamba Cult

One tribe, the Bashilenge, formed their entire religion around the use of cannabis. The Bashilenge call themselves Bena-Riamba, which is translated “the sons of hemp”. This ancient culture regarded marijuana as a god and the pipe as a symbol of peace. They believed that cannabis had universal magical powers and was used extensively to ward off evil spirits.

Deeply engrained in the fabric of African culture, cannabis was used in ancient times in a medicinal capacity to treat common conditions such as dysentery and malaria. In some tribes, marijuana was worshipped as a god and its use permeated almost every other aspect of societal life, as well.

For more on the history of cannibus, see Culturemap Houston.

References:

H. von Wissman, My Second Journey Through Equatorial Africa (London: Chatto & Windus, 1891), p. 312; cf: K. Zetterstrom, "Bena Riamba, Brothers of the Hemp", Studia Ethnographica Upsaliensia, 26 (1966): 151-65.
Reefer Briefer

Little Falls, NY

#2 Feb 6, 2014
African - 22% THC
Sativa

The use of marijuana as an intoxicant also spread quite early to Africa. In South Africa, Dr. Frances Ames of the University of Cape Town reports, marijuana "was in use for many years before Europeans settled in the country and was smoked by all the non-European races, i.e. Bushmen, Hottentots and Africans. It was probably brought to the Mozambique coast from India by Arab traders and the habit, once established, spread inland."

"The plant has been used for many purposes in South Africa. Suto women smoke it to stupefy themselves during childbirth; they also grind up the seeds with bread or meahe pap and give it to children when they are being weaned." A 1916 report noted that marijuana smoking was not only permitted but actually encouraged among South African mine workers because "after a smoke the natives work hard and show very little fatigue." The usual mine practice, the report continued, was to allow three smokes–– resembling "coffee breaks"–– a day. Farther north, "the lives of some tribes in the Congo center on hemp, which is cultivated, smoked regularly and venerated. Whenever the tribe travels it takes the Riamba [a huge calabash pipe more than a yard in diameter] with it. The man who commits a misdeed is condemned to smoke until he loses consciousness."

Cannabis was used in Africa to restore appetite and relieve pain of hemorrhoids. It was also used as an antiseptic. In a number of countries, it was used to treat tetanus, hydrophobia, delirium tremens, infantile convulsions, neuralgia and other nervous disorders, cholera, menorrhagia, rheumatism, hay fever, asthma, skin diseases, and protracted labor during childbirth.

According to Sula Benet almost all ancient peoples considered narcotic and medicinal plants sacred and incorporated them into their religious or magical beliefs and practices. In Africa, there were a number of cults and sects of hemp worship. Pogge and Wissman, during their explorations of 1881, visited the Bashilenge, living on the northern borders of the Lundu, between Sankrua and Balua. They found large plots of land around the villages used for the cultivation of hemp. Originally there were small clubs of hemp smokers, bound by ties of friendship, but these eventually led to the formation of a religious cult. The Bashilenge called themselves: Bena:Riamba --- "the sons of hemp,: and their land Lubuku, meaning friendship. They greeted each other with the expression "moio," meaning both "hemp" and "life."

Each tribesman was required to participate in the cult of Riamba and show his devotion by smoking as frequently as possible. They attributed universal magical powers to hemp, which was thought to combat all kinds of evil and they took it when they went to war and when they traveled. There were initiation rites for new members which usually took place before a war or long journey. The hemp pipe assumed a symbolic meaning for the Bashilenge somewhat analogous to the significance which the peace pipe had for American Indians. No holiday, no trade agreement, no peace treaty was transacted without it (Wissman et al. 1888). In the middle Sahara region, the Senusi sect also cultivated hemp on a large scale for use in religious ceremonies (Ibid).

South Africa and Ghana are becoming one of the world's top marijuana and oudoor cannabis seeds producers. African experts allege that South African marijuana contains a deviant THC molecule which produces extremal hallucinogenic highs. Durban Poison is a good example of mind blowing African strain. The more northern parts of Africa like Ghana are famous for its wide public marijuana cultivation.

Grade: A

THC: 22%

Genetics:
pure African Sativa Landrace

Origin:
Africa

Breeder: Landrace

Flowering Time: 16-22 weeks

Yield:
up to 400 gr

Good For: Making a movement to end Apartheid.
Reefer Briefer

Little Falls, NY

#3 Feb 6, 2014
Cannabis was used in Africa to restore appetite and relieve pain of hemorrhoids. It was also used as an antiseptic. In a number of countries, it was used to treat tetanus, hydrophobia, delirium tremens, infantile convulsions, neuralgia and other nervous disorders, cholera, menorrhagia, rheumatism, hay fever, asthma, skin diseases, and protracted labor during childbirth.[7]
According to Sula Benet almost all ancient peoples considered narcotic and medicinal plants sacred and incorporated them into their religious or magical beliefs and practices. In Africa, there were a number of cults and sects of hemp worship. Pogge and Wissman, during their explorations of 1881, visited the Bashilenge, living on the northern borders of the Lundu, between Sankrua and Balua. They found large plots of land around the villages used for the cultivation of hemp. Originally there were small clubs of hemp smokers, bound by ties of friendship, but these eventually led to the formation of a religious cult. The Bashilenge called themselves: Bena:Riamba --- "the sons of hemp,: and their land Lubuku, meaning friendship. They greeted each other with the expression "moio," meaning both "hemp" and "life."

Each tribesman was required to participate in the cult of Riamba and show his devotion by smoking as frequently as possible. They attributed universal magical powers to hemp, which was thought to combat all kinds of evil and they took it when they went to war and when they traveled. There were initiation rites for new members which usually took place before a war or long journey. The hemp pipe assumed a symbolic meaning for the Bashilenge somewhat analogous to the significance which the peace pipe had for American Indians. No holiday, no trade agreement, no peace treaty was transacted without it (Wissman et al. 1888). In the middle Sahara region, the Senusi sect also cultivated hemp on a large scale for use in religious ceremonies
BingBongBooyah

Little Falls, NY

#4 Feb 6, 2014
A short history of cannabis use in little falls. Light up, start smoking and.......... Lets go to get snacks at Stewarts!!!!!!!!!!
Reefer Briefer

Little Falls, NY

#5 Feb 6, 2014
Stoner History; A Brief History Of Marijuana In Religion
Religion is a sensitive subject for some but not when it comes to cannabis. The plant is brought up over thousands of years and numerous writings, spreading all over the world. It’s used in rituals and as a spirit healing plant. It also stands to be said that if there is a higher power, then that power put things here for a purpose. Since marijuana seems to be an absolute cure-all for almost any affliction, then we should be using it! Documented cannabis use goes back to India and Napal, somewhere around 2000-1400 BC. The text that the plant is mentioned in is called the Atharva Veda and states that cannabis is one of the five sacred plants. India and Napal religious believers not only smoke the plant but they also drink it and make hash, which they use in religious festivals. Hinduism carries the belief that cannabis (or ganja, as it is referred to) and hemp represent the deity Shiva. Worshippers offer hash as an offering to Shiva, particularly around the times of festivals. Cannabis’s trek trough history doesn’t stop there. In Africa, shaman used cannabis to treat appetite problems, as well as it’s use as an antibiotic. There were a good amount of cults in Africa that actually worshiped the hemp plant and there were even tribesmen that took on names such as The Sons of Hemp. This particular group (called Bena Riamba) even called their land Lubuku, which meant friendship. The greeting used in this area was “moio”, which was a combination of both “life” and “hemp”. Are you beginning to see the pattern emerge here? Cannabis is a highly regarded plant, used for so many different reasons. The list of religions that use cannabis at some point in their history goes on forever. It was used in Asian and European religions, as well as Islam and the most commonly cannabis associated religion of Rastafari. No matter what anyone believes in for a higher power, the people should believe in cannabis. Even though this article is short, you can clearly see that there are so many religions that have embraced the marijuana plant. They worship it because they see it as it is; a miracle plant.- See more at: http://www.stonerdays.com/stoner-history-brie...
Truthislight

United States

#6 Jul 29, 2017
Lies.
Cheech and Chong

Little Falls, NY

#7 Jul 30, 2017
I would rather spend all day with these 2 guys than one minute with some right wing christian nut job.

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