Kentucky HB 463
the law

Pittsburgh, PA

#1 Jun 29, 2011
March 07, 2011

Kentucky has become the latest state to enact sentencing reforms. Gov. Steve Beshear signed into law HB 463, a comprehensive corrections bill.

"This overhaul of Kentucky's penal code is the result of a multi-year effort involving members of the executive, legislative and judicial branches," said Gov. Beshear. "Bill 463 helps us be tough on crime, while being smart on crime."

The new law calls for sentences of "presumptive probation" for small-time drug possession offenders, meaning they will get probation unless judges can offer a compelling reason why they should go to prison. It also calls for drug treatment to be made available for drug offenders. It reduces penalties for small-time drug dealing while increasing penalties for large-scale trafficking. And it shrinks "drug-free" zones from 1,000 yards to 1,000 feet.

The law also reduces sentences for small-time drug dealing. Sales of less than four grams of cocaine, two grams of heroin or methamphetamine, or 10 dosage units of other controlled substances will be reduced from a Class C felony to a Class D felony.

The new law lowers possession of less than an ounce of marijuana from a Class A misdemeanor worth up to a year in jail to a Class B misdemeanor with a maximum sentence of 45 days in jail, if any jail sentence is imposed.

It also requires reforms of the probation and parole system. It will create "graduated sanctions" for parole violators, allowing authorities to impose short jail stays instead of sending them back to prison for technical violations. And it removes drug offenses from consideration when judges impose sentencing enhancements based on previous felony convictions.

Copied from:

http://ky.usmjparty.org/politics/45-politics/...
Gibbs

Lexington, KY

#2 Jun 30, 2011
I hope the Dention Center loses most of it's money with the new law reforms.
resident

Murphy, NC

#3 Jun 30, 2011
I don't care if the jail pays for itself. But if they got to have some felons so they can draw a check from the state, look like everybody could take a turn
ideal

Kathleen, GA

#4 Jun 30, 2011
resident wrote:
I don't care if the jail pays for itself. But if they got to have some felons so they can draw a check from the state, look like everybody could take a turn
ok you win you get to go first be sure to write us during your 5 year vacation and tell us how its working for you
progress

Pittsburgh, PA

#5 Jun 30, 2011
ideal wrote:
<quoted text>ok you win you get to go first be sure to write us during your 5 year vacation and tell us how its working for you
the new drug laws should free up bed space for white collar crime
oh my

Lexington, KY

#6 Jul 1, 2011
they're turning all the drugheads loose so they can rob and pillage to support their habit.

better buy a pistol.
Gibbs

Lexington, KY

#7 Jul 1, 2011
oh my wrote:
they're turning all the drugheads loose so they can rob and pillage to support their habit.
better buy a pistol.
you shoot someone, you will be the one in Jail.
progress

Pittsburgh, PA

#8 Jul 1, 2011
best i can understand, the new drug laws don't affect the charge of manufactering meth or the number of pot plants that equal a felony
uhohhh

Corbin, KY

#9 Mar 31, 2013
Anyone know what sentence would be for trafficking over 10+lbs marij first offense ever
redneck34

Lexington, KY

#10 Apr 1, 2013
oh my wrote:
they're turning all the drugheads loose so they can rob and pillage to support their habit.

better buy a pistol.
Yeah do all the drugs you want but if you can't pay a fine off in time it don't matter if your in a coma you gone to jail.just like child support ever one should b treated equal one can go to jail for missing a payment while others are thousands behind out walking crazy
Alex E Hagedorn

Morganfield, KY

#11 Aug 20, 2013
If hb 463 passes the amount of addictive behavioral citizens will increase greatly, seeing how the commonwealth of Ky has the highest rate of imprisinment. This means there will be more addicts out on the street with the ability to steal and rob for money or there desired substance of choice. If they are not ready to accept help or have a desire for bettering themselves.
What implications can we draw from this? Increased robbery due to desperation and freedom to act on these addictive desires. Or an increase in productive citizens? Well this question is no we're near simple to answer with a yes or no. It will depend on the article which dictates as such, If judges can draw out a formidable reason the defendent should be made to serve prison time, they will in turn serve time. This helps with the truly hardcore criminals escaping incarceration, due to a leniate but ultimately more advanced and more productive penal code. 25% of Ky's prisons hold class D non violent felons.(exhausting resourcing power) This percent could possibly be out of prison working, getting paid, and paying bills at the bare minimum. We have the ability to adapt and evolve as an intelligent race. We can reason, argue, defend, and even fight and die for what are hearts and minds believe in. Please try to consider all variables when implementing laws that could ultimately increase the efficiency, maximum work and value output of our beloved commonwealth of Kentucky.
Veteran

Lexington, KY

#12 Aug 20, 2013
Alex E Hagedorn wrote:
If hb 463 passes the amount of addictive behavioral citizens will increase greatly, seeing how the commonwealth of Ky has the highest rate of imprisinment. This means there will be more addicts out on the street with the ability to steal and rob for money or there desired substance of choice. If they are not ready to accept help or have a desire for bettering themselves.
What implications can we draw from this? Increased robbery due to desperation and freedom to act on these addictive desires. Or an increase in productive citizens? Well this question is no we're near simple to answer with a yes or no. It will depend on the article which dictates as such, If judges can draw out a formidable reason the defendent should be made to serve prison time, they will in turn serve time. This helps with the truly hardcore criminals escaping incarceration, due to a leniate but ultimately more advanced and more productive penal code. 25% of Ky's prisons hold class D non violent felons.(exhausting resourcing power) This percent could possibly be out of prison working, getting paid, and paying bills at the bare minimum. We have the ability to adapt and evolve as an intelligent race. We can reason, argue, defend, and even fight and die for what are hearts and minds believe in. Please try to consider all variables when implementing laws that could ultimately increase the efficiency, maximum work and value output of our beloved commonwealth of Kentucky.
Or, and here's a thought, we could spend that prison money to send the addict to rehab; you know, something that might actually work. Because prison doesn't work. Why keep spending all this money to lock people up, when it doesn't solve the problem?
Veteran

Lexington, KY

#15 Aug 21, 2013
Alex E Hagedorn wrote:
<quoted text>Why yes it does. probaly because it is me. but never the less, my arguement stands and has yet to be rebuttled maturely and properly.. if you continue to search my record, you will see that my class D was reduced to a misdemeaner. i have no serious implications of my record. i am not trying to argue just for mysake and my persanol record. It is a matter of value and effieciency to me, for homo sapien everywere to aspire to be the most prompt and exact as possible without creating altercations and handicaps in society. I dream of seeing solid state society, i know i will not see this in my life, but i feel i can help the process along by adding my reasoning to anyone who cares. thank you for bringin my condition to the light, people can now more accurately judge me and my words.
Work some steps. Tend to your own business. Assuming you're not using, you haven't been sober long enough to be offering an opinion. Incarceration isn't an answer to addiction issues, and you should know that.
Alex E Hagedorn

United States

#16 Aug 21, 2013
Veteran wrote:
<quoted text>
Work some steps. Tend to your own business. Assuming you're not using, you haven't been sober long enough to be offering an opinion. Incarceration isn't an answer to addiction issues, and you should know that.
I never said to lock up addicts. in fact i was quite clear that i am pro hb 463. Furthermore opinions do not require a certain amount of time clean. if that were the case everybody who has never touched a drug would not have an opinion... Like ive said for the 3rd time now. please try to stay on track and rebuttle to my original HB 463 arguement. Attacking me personaly, and not my views and arguement, well its just counter productive on your part. If anything it shows a lack of wisdom, knowledge, validity, and reputation. you cant counter my points, so u try to rationalize them by attacking me and my current position that you know of, by making look bad(a criminal who just wants to get off scott free) so pretend these words come from somone else if need be. The background check is a very small amount of data on my life. You simply do not have all the variables to make such an assumpition. The courts show you records of my criminal behavior. They do not give you all info on me. Now please, my brothers and sisters, do not look at me when reading. It matters not who says these words, only that they are said and heard. So the commonwealths citizens can more accuratley decide the fate of the country. This info is to expand and open the minds of people to new possibilities, that can lead to a much brighter future.
Veteran

Lexington, KY

#17 Aug 21, 2013
Alex E Hagedorn wrote:
<quoted text>I never said to lock up addicts. in fact i was quite clear that i am pro hb 463. Furthermore opinions do not require a certain amount of time clean. if that were the case everybody who has never touched a drug would not have an opinion... Like ive said for the 3rd time now. please try to stay on track and rebuttle to my original HB 463 arguement. Attacking me personaly, and not my views and arguement, well its just counter productive on your part. If anything it shows a lack of wisdom, knowledge, validity, and reputation. you cant counter my points, so u try to rationalize them by attacking me and my current position that you know of, by making look bad(a criminal who just wants to get off scott free) so pretend these words come from somone else if need be. The background check is a very small amount of data on my life. You simply do not have all the variables to make such an assumpition. The courts show you records of my criminal behavior. They do not give you all info on me. Now please, my brothers and sisters, do not look at me when reading. It matters not who says these words, only that they are said and heard. So the commonwealths citizens can more accuratley decide the fate of the country. This info is to expand and open the minds of people to new possibilities, that can lead to a much brighter future.
Pro? This is what you wrote:

"If hb 463 passes the amount of addictive behavioral citizens will increase greatly, seeing how the commonwealth of Ky has the highest rate of imprisinment."

How is that pro? You're making no sense. Perhaps you need to see a psychiatrist. Your thinking is quite grandiose. Are you bipolar?

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