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21 - 40 of 63 Comments Last updated Jul 29, 2013
Droopyballs

Gardner, MA

#22 Jul 27, 2013
Hmmmm wrote:
Droopy, try and remember that we are dealing with certain people who have never ran a company or any department of any kind but believe they could do the job better. Also dont forget that some of these posters despise municipal workers and constantly degrade them but at the same time proclaim they want to work for the city. Try and figure that mentality out.
For example, I will read a long rant about how this person is bad that person doesn't do their job etc. and they throw peoples names out there with zero facts. Then when I respond 'Well what do you do for work?' The response is 'Who are you coward?? Ask me to my face!!! Is your brother still A cop??? Lmao Are you still sleeping with other mens wives??'. I don't even have a brother and I've never slept with another mans wife.
The other mentality that people have is that no municipal employee should be earning more than minimal wage because their taxes pay for their salaries.

They believe that all municipal employees are "blue collar" workers. Well that may have been the case 40-70 years ago when these jobs did not require college degrees, experience or extensive formal training.

They refuse to accept the fact that many municipal employees are now "white collar" workers. Even police and firefighters are now earning "white collar" wages because of the mandatory education and training the job requires. These are not "blue collar" wage jobs anymore.

The problem is many residents who are now senior citizens and middle aged have either worked or grew up thru the 60's and 70's and are still living in that era where a municipal employee was suppose to be a low wage job.

Sorry but times have changed just like the private sector.

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#23 Jul 27, 2013
Civil Servant Supporter wrote:
Shit, Stamos, I don't know why that happened...
You must have been drunk and forgot to change your moniker at one of those gay militant San Francisco sites you frequent. And don't flatter yourself Civil, I have no need nor would I waist my time patting myself on the back for calling you out on your own hypocrisy. Like I told you before, you've given me no reason to question your service but I do know you've been on here "spinning yarn" as you call it, but we all know Civil, including you that that's just your way of admitting you've been caught lying.
Hmmmm

Leominster, MA

#24 Jul 27, 2013
Stamos what's the problem? Civil keeps asking you out on a man date to suck down Georges sausage. Even Lynch wants to join in and claims he swallowed four there just the other day. What's the special sauce?
Lynch

Fitchburg, MA

#26 Jul 27, 2013
Hmmmm wrote:
Stamos what's the problem? Civil keeps asking you out on a man date to suck down Georges sausage. Even Lynch wants to join in and claims he swallowed four there just the other day. What's the special sauce?
It is a woman who works there. She is very nice and the food is very good.
Hmmmm

Leominster, MA

#27 Jul 27, 2013
Lynch wrote:
<quoted text>
It is a woman who works there. She is very nice and the food is very good.
What differnce does it make if it's a man or woman who works there? If the food is good have some chow and a great time. What? Now you are predjudice about gender? It's 2013 son, women work and don't just sit in the kitchen at home and bake cookies.
Hmmmm

Leominster, MA

#28 Jul 27, 2013
Lynch wrote:
<quoted text>
It is a woman who works there. She is very nice and the food is very good.
I suppose in the post you are trying to show off your keen powers of observation? Kudos to you Sherlock, you can tell the difference between a man and a woman. What's your next brilliant feat, bragging that you can tell the difference between a cat and a dog? My point in gender should not make a difference in any occupation.
Lynch

Fitchburg, MA

#29 Jul 27, 2013
Hmmmm wrote:
Stamos what's the problem? Civil keeps asking you out on a man date to suck down Georges sausage. Even Lynch wants to join in and claims he swallowed four there just the other day. What's the special sauce?
This is a rude comment. Do you have any class?
Hmmmm

Leominster, MA

#30 Jul 27, 2013
What's so rude Mr.afraid he can't win a weiner eating contest? I'm no Kobayashi but you sit me on a picnic table and I can eat my share and more.

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#31 Jul 28, 2013
FITCHBURG -- Now that Police Chief Robert DeMoura has announced his retirement at the end of the year, the city must begin the search for a replacement.

But who will that person be, and what sort of skills and experience should he or she possess? Will that replacement come from within the department, or be someone from the outside, like DeMoura was?

Have the hallmarks of an effective, 21st century police chief changed dramatically during his six-year tenure? How have the city's needs changed in that time?

Insider or outsider?

Kaddy said he's already been approached by many people who believe the new chief should come from outside of the city, to bring in fresh ideas. He's not sure how he feels about that.

Sampson said the question of whether to hire from within or from outside of the department is largely dependent upon the current status of the agency.

"If you have a police department where they've had the opportunity and the resources to actively engage the command staff in ensuring professional growth and professional standards, then it may be very appropriate to appoint from within," he said. "There are some times when the internal culture of an agency needs a different vision. And clearly, Chief DeMoura came in at a time when the city needed a new vision, and he certainly had the credentials to provide that change in culture."

One of the pitfalls of hiring a chief from outside the department, however, Kaddy said, is the risk of insulting members who have built their careers here. On the other hand, he said, with a person coming in from the outside, there is less of a risk of favoritism.

Follow Alana Melanson at facebook.com/alanasentinel or on Twitter @alanamelanson.

Mayor Lisa Wong is forming a search committee that will seek to answer those questions, and find the most qualified candidate.

Councilor Joel Kaddy, who as chairman of the City Council's Public Safety Committee will have a seat on the selection committee, said when DeMoura was hired, the city had a different set of problems than it does today, so he and the other committee members are going to have to think hard about the qualifications and priorities they want in the next chief.

A. Wayne Sampson, executive director of the Massachusetts Association of Chiefs of Police and a former police chief in Shrewsbury, said the city should be looking for someone with broad knowledge and experience in the law-enforcement profession and its various internal divisions, solid training and an understanding of both the local and the broader regional and statewide issues.

"But it's much more than just the professional standards," he said. "When a community is doing a search for a police chief, they're looking for someone that can meet the vision of the community moving forward, but the person has to understand the unique culture of the individual town -- and the way a police department delivers the services to a community can be equally as unique."

While the chief must have a vision, there must also be an agreement between the chief and the rest of the force on that vision, the mission of the agency, and how it is going to be accomplished, Sampson said. He said a chief must have an appreciation of the department, and where the personnel is coming from.

John Firman, director of research for the International Association of Chiefs of Police, said it's also important for a chief to understand the needs and fears of constituents, be able to communicate with them, deliver an appropriate response, and be versed in protocols and procedures. These skills are eternal, he said, but practically everything else has changed over the years.

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#32 Jul 28, 2013
Technology tools
Sampson said technology and data are critical components of the future of policing, "not just for the value of the data that is produced and how that affects the delivery of police services, but it's also important for the employees of the agency because the new employees we're bringing in today have been brought up on the use of that technology."
He said the biggest impact of technology during the past five to 10 years has been the availability of information and the speed at which that information can be disseminated, which helps to solve cases. DNA testing technology has also vastly improved, Sampson said, allowing law enforcement to better prosecute the guilty and clear the innocent.
Firman pointed to a number of technologies that are changing policing, some that are more widespread among police entities, such as license-plate readers, and others that aren't, such as body cameras, and acoustic gunshot detection systems, which can determine whether a sound is a gunshot, how many shots were fired, the rapidity, and the likely millimeter and type of gun.
Under DeMoura, the COMPSTAT program was introduced to the Fitchburg Police Department, Wong said, which uses data to look for patterns and trends in crime and quality-of-life issues to develop strategies of enforcement and effective allocation of resources. He's also been a force in getting technology into the hands of officers and in cruisers to help them better do their jobs, she said.
People, political skills
But it's not all about technology, Sampson said -- a chief has to understand the human component as well, both within the agency and within the community.
"We're dealing with the most diffcult parts of a person's life," he said. "We don't get to deal with a lot of people during their most joyous times. We're dealing with them in crisis."
Sampson said professional standards have also changed dramatically over the past 20 years, and chiefs today often spend much of their time ingrained in the administrative component of the position, ensuring compliance with standards and reporting requirements mandated on both state and federal levels.
"Today, chiefs have to make a real effort to make the time to get out and be part of the community," he said.
The fact that DeMoura has been out in the community as much as he has, and is regularly interacting with citizens, shows he cares deeply for the community, Sampson said.
Wong said that from 2011 to 2012, Fitchburg experienced a nearly 20 percent drop in crime, the second largest drop in the state behind Newton, and the city is no longer on the FBI's most dangerous cities list.
A significant part of why crime has dropped is because police aren't the only ones working on public-safety issues, she said -- the barriers between the police and the community have been lowered and the community is involved and engaged.
Kaddy said he believes the new chief has to have at least a master's degree and experience of at least the level of a captain at a larger department. He said experience with budgeting, payroll and scheduling are vital, as well as some experience on the political end, going before a city council or another governing body.
"The trend is clear," Firman said. "Higher education is a pretty strong requirement for police at the upper levels."
While there is no set standard on the level of education a chief should have, he said, most departments are now requiring an undergraduate degree, at minimum -- for most officers. Many chiefs have at least one master's degree, Firman said.

Since: Feb 10

Location hidden

#33 Jul 28, 2013
"If I'm a chief, I've got to keep an awful lot of people happy," Firman said, including officers, the union, the governing body of the city, the citizens, and the media. "That's not easily achievable. Police chiefs have to have tremendous communication and articulation skills, enough education to think their way out of problems, and enough experience and exposure to problems, and a vision as well."

Long-term vision

That ability to look down the road is important, he said, to figure out where the department is taking itself and what it wants to do. Having strong command staff is vital, Firman said, so the chief can be proactive instead of reactive.

Firman said the trend of evidence-based policing is moving into the future of the profession, and police entities need to be open to collaborating with universities to engage in mutually beneficial research. He gave the example of a foot patrol experiment conducted by Temple University in Philadelphia, in which police foot patrols flooded neighborhoods with high crime, and studies done by the university showed crime was knocked down dramatically.

Another sea change in policing, Firman said, is getting the police involved in larger, systemic issues they may not have traditionally had a part in, such as efforts to reduce recidivism -- which is currently at 60 percent nationally -- and wrongful convictions, as well as educating officers on how to better deal with those who have mental-health conditions.

"Run your department well, take care of your officers, but don't be in a box," Firman said. "Don't put blinders on, and say,'We only do policing.'"

When it comes to wrongful convictions, he said, law enforcement can't take the view that it's only under the purview of the courts, judges and juries, and that it's not their problem.

"What it's really about is quality investigative practices at the front end," Firman said. "You have to have wrongful arrest and wrongful prosecution before you get wrongful conviction."

In a place like Fitchburg, with a tremendous drug problem, he said police must team up with community partners and create consortiums to solve the big issues.
http://www.sentinelandenterprise.com/news/ci_...
Hmmmm

Fitchburg, MA

#34 Jul 28, 2013
Lynch wrote:
<quoted text>
This is a rude comment. Do you have any class?
You are trash raised by the trashiest parents. You and your family are garbage.
Peaches

Fitchburg, MA

#35 Jul 28, 2013
Stamos wrote:
FITCHBURG -- Now that Police Chief Robert DeMoura has announced his retirement at the end of the year, the city must begin the search for a replacement.
But who will that person be, and what sort of skills and experience should he or she possess?
Kaddy said he's already been approached by many people who believe the new chief should come from outside of the city, to bring in fresh ideas. He's not sure how he feels about that"
One of the pitfalls of hiring a chief from outside the department, however, Kaddy said, is the risk of insulting members .
Councilor Joel Kaddy, who as chairman of the City Council's Public Safety Committee will have a seat on the selection committee, said when DeMoura was hired, the city had a different set of problems than it does today, so he and the other committee members are going to have to think hard about the qualifications and priorities they want in the next chief..
what if you are no longer the ward 3 councilor after thne election, step aside this city needs new vision and thats not you
Lynch

Fitchburg, MA

#36 Jul 28, 2013
Stamos wrote:
"If I'm a chief, I've got to keep an awful lot of people happy," Firman said, including officers, the union, the governing body of the city, the citizens, and the media. "That's not easily achievable. Police chiefs have to have tremendous communication and articulation skills, enough education to think their way out of problems, and enough experience and exposure to problems, and a vision as well."
Long-term vision
That ability to look down the road is important, he said, to figure out where the department is taking itself and what it wants to do. Having strong command staff is vital, Firman said, so the chief can be proactive instead of reactive.
Firman said the trend of evidence-based policing is moving into the future of the profession, and police entities need to be open to collaborating with universities to engage in mutually beneficial research. He gave the example of a foot patrol experiment conducted by Temple University in Philadelphia, in which police foot patrols flooded neighborhoods with high crime, and studies done by the university showed crime was knocked down dramatically.
Another sea change in policing, Firman said, is getting the police involved in larger, systemic issues they may not have traditionally had a part in, such as efforts to reduce recidivism -- which is currently at 60 percent nationally -- and wrongful convictions, as well as educating officers on how to better deal with those who have mental-health conditions.
"Run your department well, take care of your officers, but don't be in a box," Firman said. "Don't put blinders on, and say,'We only do policing.'"
When it comes to wrongful convictions, he said, law enforcement can't take the view that it's only under the purview of the courts, judges and juries, and that it's not their problem.
"What it's really about is quality investigative practices at the front end," Firman said. "You have to have wrongful arrest and wrongful prosecution before you get wrongful conviction."
In a place like Fitchburg, with a tremendous drug problem, he said police must team up with community partners and create consortiums to solve the big issues.
http://www.sentinelandenterprise.com/news/ci_...
I wouldn't allow this current city council to decide. We need an outside Chief otherwise NOTHING will get done for the citizens.

Kaddy calls it favoritism, coming from Kaddy this decision should be a no brainer, pick from outside Fitchburg. Kearns should apply for the Lowell job.

Demouras' hands were tied due to this city council RUBBER STAMPING the FPD contract. Public safety needs should NEVER take a back seat to the FPD union contract.

Lou Pole

Fitchburg, MA

#37 Jul 28, 2013
Not that I want to stimulate Lynch but let's face the obvious, folks.

For the little that DeMoura actually accomplished (identify one original idea or borrowed concept DeMoura was responsible for) he could, and probably should,be relaced with a blow-up doll.
Droopyballs

Gardner, MA

#39 Jul 28, 2013
Lynch wrote:
<quoted text>
I wouldn't allow this current city council to decide. We need an outside Chief otherwise NOTHING will get done for the citizens.
Kaddy calls it favoritism, coming from Kaddy this decision should be a no brainer, pick from outside Fitchburg. Kearns should apply for the Lowell job.
Demouras' hands were tied due to this city council RUBBER STAMPING the FPD contract. Public safety needs should NEVER take a back seat to the FPD union contract.
Demoura approved the FPD contract. The Chief and Mayor are the ones that negotiate with the union.

You need a whole lot of education on bargaining, actually you seem really lost on everything. Why is that?
Lynch

Fitchburg, MA

#40 Jul 28, 2013
Hmmmm wrote:
<quoted text>
You are trash raised by the trashiest parents. You and your family are garbage.
What is your problem? Now you will complain to everyone that I called you a POS and a COWARD!

You have insulted my family and I will not stand for that, change your name Hmmm to COWARDLY lion!
Lynch

Fitchburg, MA

#41 Jul 28, 2013
The Mayor has failed and the City council has FAILED concerning the FO contract. They lack courage when it comes to dealing with the FPD union.

Demoura will tell you the same! When the Union says jump the mayor asks," how high!!"

We have Kaddy talkig about "FAVORITISM" ; come on folks when are you going to open your blinders??
Droopyballs

Gardner, MA

#42 Jul 28, 2013
Lynch wrote:
The Mayor has failed and the City council has FAILED concerning the FO contract. They lack courage when it comes to dealing with the FPD union.
Demoura will tell you the same! When the Union says jump the mayor asks," how high!!"
We have Kaddy talkig about "FAVORITISM" ; come on folks when are you going to open your blinders??
The City Council doe not see the contents of any union contract. It is against the law. They only see if there are any raises or decreases in salary.

Only the Mayor, the Chief and union members see the contract. Sorry but if you think that you want to be on the council just to see the union contracts you are out of luck.
Hmmmm

Leominster, MA

#43 Jul 28, 2013
Let's be clear of one thing snitch boy. It obviously wasn't me who insulted your family. I don't mind people using my moniker as it's considered to be a compliment. I don't know your family or you on a personal level and I don't care to.

As far as your disdain towards the next Chief of police why don't you take a stab at it? Chief Lynch!!!

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