Loyalhanna Care center

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why

Pittsburgh, PA

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#1
Dec 8, 2011
 
What is Loyalhanna Care Center?
why

Pittsburgh, PA

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#2
Dec 8, 2011
 
what is loyalhanna care center like?
Hellbillysombitc h

Pittsburgh, PA

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#3
Dec 8, 2011
 

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expensive.
why

Pittsburgh, PA

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#4
Dec 8, 2011
 
What are the people who work there like?
LOK

Latrobe, PA

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#5
Dec 8, 2011
 
awesome. had nothing but good experiences with them.
bubsalette

Pittsburgh, PA

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#6
Dec 8, 2011
 
Great place,My mother was there and was really cared for.
elder warfare

Latrobe, PA

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#7
Dec 8, 2011
 

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The place stinks like urine, the old people are wheeled around in wheel chairs and left to sit for hours, unattended in hallways, many of the elderly are not tended to for hours, and need their bedding changed far more often than is sanitary, and the elderly are often left untended for too long and develop bed sores.

Would rather die early in life than be a prisoner at this sub-standard elder-care facility.

I'd also take a guess that the elderly here are over-medicated, given the looks -- or blanks stares -- on their faces.
Voice of Reality

Latrobe, PA

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#8
Dec 8, 2011
 

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The locals...both the hospital and the doctors.....send you there because you have no hope left and will DIE .

Read the obituaries......when people die, they are there
LOK

Latrobe, PA

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#9
Dec 8, 2011
 
Yes, the wing with mostly bad Alzheimer's does smell of urine, because it is an everyday occurrence. ONE hallway. The rest of the wings are less further down the Alzheimers paths and are good to go. Grandma was there for 4 years and ran out of money and needed more help and had to move out, but our personal experience was good. We checked her out several times a week to get her with our family during events and they were all very good with the folks. Wish we could still afford them. There are rooms that are like apartments. Nice. Either way, I wish you good luck with your journey. Never a fun decision. Blessings!
elder warfare

Latrobe, PA

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#10
Dec 8, 2011
 
LOK wrote:
Yes, the wing with mostly bad Alzheimer's does smell of urine, because it is an everyday occurrence. ONE hallway. The rest of the wings are less further down the Alzheimers paths and are good to go. Grandma was there for 4 years and ran out of money and needed more help and had to move out, but our personal experience was good. We checked her out several times a week to get her with our family during events and they were all very good with the folks. Wish we could still afford them. There are rooms that are like apartments. Nice. Either way, I wish you good luck with your journey. Never a fun decision. Blessings!
Why when your grandma ran out of money, didn't your grandma receive continued care through MEDICAID?

Is your grandma still alive?

The Bethlan Home in Ligonier has an outstanding Alzheimer's wing, the best I've seen in SW PA.

I am sorry that your grandma had to leave a facility that you believed was good for her, when she could have stayed and gotten the care she needed.

It is interesting to note that every family who's "checked" on their family member at Loyalhanna, was happy, but for family who just dropped in occasionally, who lived out of the area -- these people were always appalled at the state that they found their elder relatives left in.
Redneck

Latrobe, PA

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#11
Dec 8, 2011
 

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After it became impossible to take care of my mother, we had to place her in a care facility. I was glad it was Loyalhanna Care Center. Many of you touched on the most important part of placing parents in a home...the need to stay in contact with them.

I can't criticize those who do not visit their loved ones on a daily basis because I don't know your circumstances. But if you can see your loved one every day while they are in there, they will get the best care available. If you just "dump" them in there and think the staff will look after them like one of their family..you are mistaken.

It's not the fault of the facility or the people working there. They are all good people doing the best they can...but there is only so much that can be done by so few working in such a labor intensive environment. One bad patient can take up a lot of manhours by the staff. You can't expect your loved one to have a private duty nurse/caregiver with them 24 hrs a day in a care home unless you are super-wealthy. If you want your loved one to be treated like family, then you as a member of the family must take part as much as possible. The more you are involved, the better care your loved one will receive, even when you're not there.

I too, hope I never have to be placed in any home. But if I do, I hope my family comes and visits every day...and it is in a place as good as Loyalhanna Care Center.
Curious

Burgettstown, PA

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#13
Dec 21, 2011
 
On the subject, does anyone know what Latrobe Care Center is like?
Not too happy either

Latrobe, PA

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#14
Dec 21, 2011
 
elder warfare wrote:
<quoted text>
Why when your grandma ran out of money, didn't your grandma receive continued care through MEDICAID?
Is your grandma still alive?
The Bethlan Home in Ligonier has an outstanding Alzheimer's wing, the best I've seen in SW PA.
I am sorry that your grandma had to leave a facility that you believed was good for her, when she could have stayed and gotten the care she needed.
It is interesting to note that every family who's "checked" on their family member at Loyalhanna, was happy, but for family who just dropped in occasionally, who lived out of the area -- these people were always appalled at the state that they found their elder relatives left in.
Renee, keep your two cents to yourself. Just because you opted to keep mommy at home and rip her off doesn't mean that the care center is a terrible place.
In the know

Irwin, PA

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#15
Dec 21, 2011
 

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DO NOT go to Latrobe Care Center...just my opinion.

Most of these places are not the best place to be. But the nurses and staff do their jobs well, to the best of their ability. I was a nurse at a local home, so I have seen it first hand what goes on day to day. The aides and nurses do the best they can. But staffing is always lacking, management turns a blind eye, and there is always a patient requiring more of your time than you have. A sad situation.

As for the odor of urine, its nearly impossible to avoid. When over half the residents are incontinent, not only in their briefs, but on bedding, mattresses, floors, clothing, etc, its hard to totally eliminate that odor. Understand the staff does the best they can. Housekeeping is limited. The aides must clean it all up, and when you have call bells going off and residents falling or screaming, you just cant stay on your hands and knees to scrub the floor as it should be, nor do you have the time to get the urine reeking garbage or linen carts off the floor before visitors walk in and smell it.

Other than LCT, they are all about the same. None of them will be able to ever provide the attention and care of a loved one as the family would in their own home.

I hope I never have to be a resident in a home. Although the staff does a tremendous job with what they are dealt each shift, they are still not the best place to be.
Redneck

Latrobe, PA

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#16
Dec 21, 2011
 
For those who have experienced the environment of care facilities; what should be done with the very bad patients who just linger in a near vegetative and sometimes insufferable state of confusion and pain? Watching the people at different care facilities unable to do for themselves or even communicate with others, I wonder what it is really like to be in such a condition. To be dressed, fed, medicated into a stupor and then put in a wheel chair or bed unattended and isolated for hours, day after day.

When this is the best that can be done for a person, I feel that euthanasia is the most sane and compassionate avenue to take. When people get to such a debilitated state in such a home, there should be a type of blind lottery in place where a random dose of a fatal medication would be given at an unknown date to whoever is located in such a designated hospice section. Either the person could opt to take part, or the person who acts as their legal representative could make the call. Once they have accepted this path, they would not know exactly when the end would come. One night they would go to bed as usual, and then never wake up.

As harsh as this might sound, anyone who has had to watch loved ones suffer day after day knowing that each day will never be better but only worse knows that such a choice is not so unconscionable. An individual totally unable to control oneís own life and destiny while being in constant fear, pain, depression, hopelessness and confusion is. The end of life, like the beginning, rarely comes as quickly and painlessly as a light switch being turned on or off. It is a shame that the final act of individual humanity has to be so inhumane.
LOK

Pittsburgh, PA

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#17
Dec 22, 2011
 
Redneck wrote:
For those who have experienced the environment of care facilities; what should be done with the very bad patients who just linger in a near vegetative and sometimes insufferable state of confusion and pain? Watching the people at different care facilities unable to do for themselves or even communicate with others, I wonder what it is really like to be in such a condition. To be dressed, fed, medicated into a stupor and then put in a wheel chair or bed unattended and isolated for hours, day after day.
When this is the best that can be done for a person, I feel that euthanasia is the most sane and compassionate avenue to take. When people get to such a debilitated state in such a home, there should be a type of blind lottery in place where a random dose of a fatal medication would be given at an unknown date to whoever is located in such a designated hospice section. Either the person could opt to take part, or the person who acts as their legal representative could make the call. Once they have accepted this path, they would not know exactly when the end would come. One night they would go to bed as usual, and then never wake up.
As harsh as this might sound, anyone who has had to watch loved ones suffer day after day knowing that each day will never be better but only worse knows that such a choice is not so unconscionable. An individual totally unable to control oneís own life and destiny while being in constant fear, pain, depression, hopelessness and confusion is. The end of life, like the beginning, rarely comes as quickly and painlessly as a light switch being turned on or off. It is a shame that the final act of individual humanity has to be so inhumane.
Going through this as we speak, I can add even maore to your points. We moved back here in 2000, and gramma was a whitty/spry/fiesty old lady. Kept her house in remarkable order at 80 years old. She played card/cleaned house/cooked for us, had us over etc... About 8 years ago she started having "episodes." She would jsut lay down and appear to go to sleep (in the mall/park you name it.) Turned out she needed a pacemaker at 82 (who knew.)SO we had one put in. She has been awake every since. Here in lies the family conundrum. The entire family 30 plus siblings/close relatives thought, YES she is a busy body etc, loves life, nothing to think about right? WRONG! two years after the pacemaker, she started dimentia/alzhiemers and is now completely oblivious to anything called life. Her BODY is in perfect working order and the doctors say she can live to be 110 on this body of hers. Guess what, she has NO MIND left. Her quality of life is a routine one, but she can not be left alone for one second. Should we have been so selfish as to keep her on this earth with us, or let her go where she deserved? NOW, we have NEW episodes. Is she dieying for real or do we keep her alive for our selfish purposes. Me, I am dining on a death cocktail long before my kiddos/wife get that chance to be selfish!!!!
Redneck

Latrobe, PA

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#18
Dec 22, 2011
 
LOK wrote:
<quoted text>Going through this as we speak, I can add even maore to your points. We moved back here in 2000, and gramma was a whitty/spry/fiesty old lady. Kept her house in remarkable order at 80 years old. She played card/cleaned house/cooked for us, had us over etc... About 8 years ago she started having "episodes." She would jsut lay down and appear to go to sleep (in the mall/park you name it.) Turned out she needed a pacemaker at 82 (who knew.)SO we had one put in. She has been awake every since. Here in lies the family conundrum. The entire family 30 plus siblings/close relatives thought, YES she is a busy body etc, loves life, nothing to think about right? WRONG! two years after the pacemaker, she started dimentia/alzhiemers and is now completely oblivious to anything called life. Her BODY is in perfect working order and the doctors say she can live to be 110 on this body of hers. Guess what, she has NO MIND left. Her quality of life is a routine one, but she can not be left alone for one second. Should we have been so selfish as to keep her on this earth with us, or let her go where she deserved? NOW, we have NEW episodes. Is she dieying for real or do we keep her alive for our selfish purposes. Me, I am dining on a death cocktail long before my kiddos/wife get that chance to be selfish!!!!
It is a very difficult position for family members, having to make a life/death call when there is even a small spark left of what was once a wonderful person. Too often, the end is not spoken about with elderly people because it is such a touchy and difficult subject. One doesn't want to appear as a vulture in wait...but it is more difficult to be forced into a life/death position with no discussion or preparation with the dying person.

Thankfully, I had many conversations with my mother prior to her last days. With the deepest sincerity and not a plea for pity, she told me she prayed every night that God would take her. Itís a tough thing to hear...but a comfort when the decision to ether fight for a life that was more torture than relief and the choice to make her comfortable and say goodbye...forever.

It still haunts me that I had to make such a call, but it wasn't really mine as much as it was hers. It's something that helps makes her passing tolerable. Even if I could have the choice today and bring her back for just a day or two under those same horrible conditions, I would not do it to her. Yes, it would be something I would like for me, but it would be more suffering for her.
I too hope that I will be in a position to act out the choice to die before undergoing the conditions mentioned previously. But one has to realize that too often we are too suddenly put in a position where we cannot.
Death Camp

Charleroi, PA

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#19
Dec 22, 2011
 
It is my oppinion that these bastards "Killed" my Grandmother. Their lack of Professionalism combined with the fact that my Grandmother was not wealthy contributed to Her death. Watch out for Doctor Wong !!!
Loki

United States

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#20
Dec 22, 2011
 
My father died twenty years ago and his death tore our family apart. He had had two strokes and the doctors said if and when he had a third one it would either kill him or completely paralyze him. Unfortunately it did not kill him. He had written instructions that he did not want to be on life support, but not about the insertion of a feeding tube. He had full mental function but my mother was given the choice on putting in the feeding tube or not. She went against his wishes and put it in. My dad as far as im concerned died the day he had the last stroke. Unfortunately he live another two years. He had a few limited things he could wisper but he could yell the word no. He did this every time he was fed. Twenty years later I can still hear him screaming. My mom and me never really saw eye to eye and while time has softened the pain I still feel she tortured him. My children have neen given very clear end of life instruction for me. I never want them to have to make that decision for me or bear the pain of watching me slowly die. This is definitely a conversations all families should have.
Annie

Latrobe, PA

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#21
Dec 22, 2011
 
Hi Ang

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