Metal detectors behind the courthouse

Metal detectors behind the courthouse

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Snipes

Lexington, KY

#1 Nov 28, 2009
Sometime back before they fenced off the lot were the new justice center is being built I happen to notice some guys going over the dirt mounds with metal detectors.

Does anyone know who they were and if they found anything intersting? That is like gronud zero for our local history I would imagine that they at least found some old coins. I wish I had thought of giving it the once over before it was fenced off.

zeus

Lexington, KY

#2 Nov 29, 2009
they probably fount nails and bottle caps
Snipes

Lexington, KY

#3 Nov 30, 2009
zeus wrote:
they probably fount nails and bottle caps
Zeus - you are correct, we're too poor around here to have misplaced much of anything valuable. In fact I did hear from someone that they found a few old dimes and nickles but mostly trash like you thought.

“give peace a chance”

Since: Oct 09

Lancaster will always be home

#4 Nov 30, 2009
History was the biggest prize lost in this new"justice center".
The local people that are leading the march to restore "THE GRAND" Theatre missed a chance to even attempt to save a much older and more valuable part of Lancaster's history by not even raising a voice to save the building that was once a hotel.
That was the old hardware store building next door to the courthouse. But the Mosses needed the money they got from tearing it down, and Garrard County needed a justice center bad.
A place to convict people with no jail to put them in, more brilliance on our politicians behalf. More of the same old political buddy game.
haha

Winchester, KY

#5 Nov 30, 2009
someone told me that they was looking for daniel boone brass balls.
Snipes

Lexington, KY

#6 Nov 30, 2009
1devilish wrote:
History was the biggest prize lost in this new"justice center".
The local people that are leading the march to restore "THE GRAND" Theatre missed a chance to even attempt to save a much older and more valuable part of Lancaster's history by not even raising a voice to save the building that was once a hotel.
That was the old hardware store building next door to the courthouse. But the Mosses needed the money they got from tearing it down, and Garrard County needed a justice center bad.
A place to convict people with no jail to put them in, more brilliance on our politicians behalf. More of the same old political buddy game.
01Devilish - I agree with most of what you say but they did need more room in the courthouse from somewhere. In your response you say "the Mosses needed the money they got from tearing it down" can you elaborate more on that?
Snipes

Lexington, KY

#7 Nov 30, 2009
haha wrote:
someone told me that they was looking for daniel boone brass balls.
Dude his were made of iron

“give peace a chance”

Since: Oct 09

Lancaster will always be home

#8 Nov 30, 2009
Snipes wrote:
<quoted text>
01Devilish - I agree with most of what you say but they did need more room in the courthouse from somewhere. In your response you say "the Mosses needed the money they got from tearing it down" can you elaborate more on that?
Do you know of any of them wanting to save that part of Lancaster's early history?
zeus

Lexington, KY

#9 Nov 30, 2009
i heard a barge carrying gold sunk in a river in garrard county not sure if it was true anyone else ever hear about that or have any stories like that

“give peace a chance”

Since: Oct 09

Lancaster will always be home

#10 Nov 30, 2009
zeus wrote:
i heard a barge carrying gold sunk in a river in garrard county not sure if it was true anyone else ever hear about that or have any stories like that
I've seen a few loaded with coal loose their load. One got washed up in Teater's bottomland near Sugar Creek backwaters back in the 70's. I guess you might call it gold if you owned the mine.

“give peace a chance”

Since: Oct 09

Lancaster will always be home

#11 Dec 27, 2009
While our leaders were looking for historical importance of Garrard County, I wonder if they considered or even knew about Mr. Forrest Calico's claim in his book that Garrard County had the first river port West Of the Appalachian Mts.
As I recall, and it's been over 40 years since I read it, there was a tobacco shipping port near the mouth of the Sugar Creek backwaters, just about where that coal barge got left by high waters back in the early 1970s.
As a child, I remember locals putting boats in the river near there, and there was what was said to be the remains of the Old Sugar Creek Ferry Boat, imbedded in the bank. To me, that, if true, is one of the main interests of our history.
Mr. Calico described the area as a very busy port, called Quantico, with a growing community. Also there was a ferry at the Paint Lick Creek backwater mouth, that was busy and operated until the late 30s or early 40s, at the end of HiWay 39 North, or Buckeye Pike, that is referred to as no ferry, now, by local people.
I think there were other ferrys mentioned, especially one at Camp Nelson, these ferrys were vital to the early citizens, and need to be remembered , too bad there is no thought of using them as a historical attraction, especially since the Buckeye area played such an important roll, and is now all but ignored and forsaken by the county leaders.
The old Liberty Baptist Church, the Gunn's Chapel Church, Antioch, and Scott's Fork, have produced a great deal of history, as have many others around the county, but I only see one church at Paint Lick in the promotion of historical importance, displayed online.
Evidently political motivation, as usual.
Sparky

Adel, GA

#12 Dec 27, 2009
1devilish wrote:
While our leaders were looking for historical importance of Garrard County, I wonder if they considered or even knew about Mr. Forrest Calico's claim in his book that Garrard County had the first river port West Of the Appalachian Mts.
As I recall, and it's been over 40 years since I read it, there was a tobacco shipping port near the mouth of the Sugar Creek backwaters, just about where that coal barge got left by high waters back in the early 1970s.
As a child, I remember locals putting boats in the river near there, and there was what was said to be the remains of the Old Sugar Creek Ferry Boat, imbedded in the bank. To me, that, if true, is one of the main interests of our history.
Mr. Calico described the area as a very busy port, called Quantico, with a growing community. Also there was a ferry at the Paint Lick Creek backwater mouth, that was busy and operated until the late 30s or early 40s, at the end of HiWay 39 North, or Buckeye Pike, that is referred to as no ferry, now, by local people.
I think there were other ferrys mentioned, especially one at Camp Nelson, these ferrys were vital to the early citizens, and need to be remembered , too bad there is no thought of using them as a historical attraction, especially since the Buckeye area played such an important roll, and is now all but ignored and forsaken by the county leaders.
The old Liberty Baptist Church, the Gunn's Chapel Church, Antioch, and Scott's Fork, have produced a great deal of history, as have many others around the county, but I only see one church at Paint Lick in the promotion of historical importance, displayed online.
Evidently political motivation, as usual.
Devilish I read Mr. Forest Calico's book and I too was fascinated to learn about the Quantico settlement. It's like we have our own ghost town right here in Garrard county. Evidently at one time early in KY history Quantico was one of the largest pioneer settlements. I chatted with some folks from the Sugar Creek area and got various stories about old building fondations etc.. being visable. So I decided to check it out. One September day me, my daughter and son-in-law waded and paddled my canoe down Sugar Creek from the bottom of Wolf Trail to where it runs into the KY River. We searched the river bank on both sides of the creek both up stream and down stream and did not see a trace of anything. I suppose we may have not looked far enough up hill from the river but most of the bottoms were planted in silage corn so it's possible any foundations could have been plowed under. We still had a good time searching even though we didn't find anything.

“give peace a chance”

Since: Oct 09

Lancaster will always be home

#13 Dec 27, 2009
Sparky wrote:
<quoted text>
Devilish I read Mr. Forest Calico's book and I too was fascinated to learn about the Quantico settlement. It's like we have our own ghost town right here in Garrard county. Evidently at one time early in KY history Quantico was one of the largest pioneer settlements. I chatted with some folks from the Sugar Creek area and got various stories about old building fondations etc.. being visable. So I decided to check it out. One September day me, my daughter and son-in-law waded and paddled my canoe down Sugar Creek from the bottom of Wolf Trail to where it runs into the KY River. We searched the river bank on both sides of the creek both up stream and down stream and did not see a trace of anything. I suppose we may have not looked far enough up hill from the river but most of the bottoms were planted in silage corn so it's possible any foundations could have been plowed under. We still had a good time searching even though we didn't find anything.
Those bottoms have seen some heavy floods, I remember several myself from the early 60s, the worst being the year that the barge got left high on the riverbank, fairly close to where I remember some very old scraps of what did appear to be from some type of riverboat.
I remember hearing some older folks telling of the river being so low before the locks were put in, that farmers drove cattle from Jessamine County to Garrard County, and visa versa.
I wish I had inquired more about that area, before all those older folks past on, but too late now,
I knew Mr. Calico, he spent a lot of time trying to preserve our heritage, and as I said before, things I read from his book have made more sense to me as the years have gone by, but he's not here to clear up a lot that was confusing and a mystery to me as a child, but I never forgot his great recording of information we might not have ever known.
The local historical society might consider mentioning his works in their plug of historical events. I know some there that are doing an outstanding job trying to tell Garrard County's contribution to Kentucky's earlier times and success. We owe Mr. Calico so much for his contribution to Garrard County.

“give peace a chance”

Since: Oct 09

Lancaster will always be home

#14 Dec 28, 2009
Sparky wrote:
<quoted text>
Devilish I read Mr. Forest Calico's book and I too was fascinated to learn about the Quantico settlement. It's like we have our own ghost town right here in Garrard county. Evidently at one time early in KY history Quantico was one of the largest pioneer settlements. I chatted with some folks from the Sugar Creek area and got various stories about old building fondations etc.. being visable. So I decided to check it out. One September day me, my daughter and son-in-law waded and paddled my canoe down Sugar Creek from the bottom of Wolf Trail to where it runs into the KY River. We searched the river bank on both sides of the creek both up stream and down stream and did not see a trace of anything. I suppose we may have not looked far enough up hill from the river but most of the bottoms were planted in silage corn so it's possible any foundations could have been plowed under. We still had a good time searching even though we didn't find anything.
From what I've been told, and seeing the remains of something protruding from the riverbank, the ferry itself was about half way down river, between the mouth of the backwaters and the bend in the river, where the pumping station for Garrard Countys water supply was built around 1970. The pumping station is just upstream from Davis Creek.
You used to be able to drive down to the ferry site by entering a gate in front of the big house that sits at the foot of the Level Ridge hill, where Steve Ray raised his family (called the Walden Farm) but owned for many years by the Teater family.
I think the foundations you referred to are in the area below, and down river from the old house.
Across in the Jessamine County side, there was a large home called the Gertie McCreary home , It sat in a river bottom near the inside of the river curve, and as a child I used binoculars to watch the river rise into the upper levels of that structure, most every spring, in the 60s and 70s. I believe it has been gone for several years now.
My great uncle owned the river bottoms that ran upriver from THe Sugar Creek backwaters, and I found many Indian relics, arrow heads, hatchets , and a tool they used to grind grain (or beat) into meal and flour.
Sadly, I lost those relics in a house fire in the 80s.
There is another interesting place on the hills above Husticle Branch that was called Parkertown. I have heard many stories about it being a lively place back in early times.
Sparky

Adel, GA

#15 Dec 28, 2009
Devilish in your note you say

"There is another interesting place on the hills above Husticle Branch that was called Parkertown. I have heard many stories about it being a lively place back in early times."

I have never heard of Parkertown before - what section of the county is it in? I find it intriguing that communiities as big or larger than Pait Lick or Bryantsville are today just vanished. I guess in the case of Quantico they probably got flooded out so often they just decided not to rebuild there.

“give peace a chance”

Since: Oct 09

Lancaster will always be home

#16 Dec 28, 2009
Sparky wrote:
Devilish in your note you say
"There is another interesting place on the hills above Husticle Branch that was called Parkertown. I have heard many stories about it being a lively place back in early times."
I have never heard of Parkertown before - what section of the county is it in? I find it intriguing that communiities as big or larger than Pait Lick or Bryantsville are today just vanished. I guess in the case of Quantico they probably got flooded out so often they just decided not to rebuild there.
Parkertown is in the Buckeye area, on the hills above the creek where we had earlier mentioned the caves, downstream from Husticle Branch.
The best source I can think of that is alive that could give you info. is, Bob, Charlie or Logan Hall. Their grandadddy lived on Paint Lick Creek, in the Madison County Side, just below there.
The property, I believe is in the James Adams family, or it was years ago.
Gertrude

Warner Robins, GA

#17 Dec 28, 2009
I was down at Hustickle ( or however you spell it ) Branch years ago and there were steps built into the rock going up the hill I suspose on the Madison Co. side. If you are not in good shape they will sure wear you out!
Gertrude

Warner Robins, GA

#18 Dec 28, 2009
I had to look it up, it's Husticle like Devilish spelled it. I figured I had better make that right before the spelling cop gets me. I suspose that stairway ended up on top of Poosey Ridge.

“give peace a chance”

Since: Oct 09

Lancaster will always be home

#19 Dec 28, 2009
Another interesting place in Buckeye is the old brick house that was once the county sanitorium, at Teatersville.
That is what I was told anyway. There was so talk back in the late 70s~early 80s, that there was a graveyard on the site of a new house being built on it and the graves were mostly people that died of colera, or some malody like that.
This was operating during the civil war days, or so I was told.
I was in the old house when the Mays lived there, but not all over it. I was told there are still places in the basement, or dungeon, where people were chained to the walls.
I'm not sure who owns the place now, but I think it should be remembered as a part of Garrard County's history.
I always loved looking at the structure and trying to imagine it in it's glory days. It seems to be built close to the same pattern as the old Daniel House on Crab Orchard Road. I love those old Civil War era homes.

“so be it !!!!”

Since: Oct 09

lancaster ky

#20 Dec 28, 2009
what a neat post!

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